Tag Archives: Marijuana

History of the U.S. Marijuana Party


ORIGINAL 239x211

 

Long before Loretta Nall campaigned on her cleavage, the activist’s cause was cannabis. The Alabama resident gained national attention during her 2006 gubernatorial campaign when she produced T-shirts with the caption “More of these boobs …” (with a photo of Nall in a low-cut shirt) “… And less of these boobs” (next to photos of her opponents). But the write-in candidate’s political roots date back to 2002, when a misdemeanor arrest for possession was the spark behind her forming the U.S. Marijuana Party (USMJP). The group — which demands “an end to the unconstitutional prohibition of marijuana” — has official party chapters in seven states, including Colorado, Illinois and Kentucky. While Nall left the USMJP to be a Libertarian Party governor nominee, the group continues to back candidates in local, state and national elections under the leadership of Richard Rawlings, who is currently running for Congress in Illinois.

Richard J Rawlings

Above:  Richard J. Rawlings, President USMjParty 2004-2011

In 2003 I started my quest for knowledge regarding Cannabis and Medical Cannabis.  In 2005 I met Ms. Tonya Davis and accompanied her to a few meetings and festivals in Ohio.  There I met Lynne Wilson and also Rev. Mary Thomas Spears who has become my closest friend since then. I remember asking Tonya Davis in 2005 if there was a political way to beat the beast so to speak, and asked her about “REPEAL”  but at the time most people were in to “Legalization”.

I went home, looked up the U.S. Marijuana Party as I had occasion to come upon it previously on the internet and had created an account there.  I made a phone call to Richard Rawlings.  I had posted on the then kentucky.usmjparty.com  but it had been taken down right before I contacted him and in fact that was my reason for calling, to find out what happened to Kentucky.

It so happened that this was about the same time as the inquiry into Marc Emery was being made by the U.S. DEA for shipping Cannabis seeds by mail to the U.S. (See this Link).  At the time I knew nothing about what was going on.  Richard put the Kentucky site back up and gave me Administrator status over it.  That was the beginning of my journey with the U.S. Marijuana Party.

From the beginning I was a “Repealer” and posted as such on the Kentucky site.  But it would be a number of years before the Party itself crossed over to being a true repeal group.

About 20 or more States were lost after Marc Emery was indicted.  I stayed on.  I do not think I even realized that he had been involved with the USMjParty to any extent and I do not believe he did have any involvement, at least by the time I started in Kentucky which was 2005.

Eventually in 2010 Richard offered me V.P. status which I hesitantly accepted because I never wanted to be a politician, it just was not my line of work so to speak.  However, after much thought I did accept and we continued on with the USMjParty even though there was no income to be had for doing it.  It was a passion and a way of life – not one to collect “funds” from.

In 2011 Richard started to become ill and by the later part of 2011 I was forced into making a decision I did not want to make but it was part of the job.  I called Bill Chengelis who was the Colorado Chair at the time and asked him to take Richard’s place as Head Chairman of the USMjParty.  I would remain on as the Kentucky Chair until the position could be filled by someone else – but that never happened.

By 2012 Richard was diagnosed with Stage IV Cancer and we stayed together until his death in February 2013.  He left me with all of his websites and the USMjParty.

I definitely did not want to be Head Chair so I decided that I would change my position considering what I had been left with to Organizer of USMjParty and I remained Kentucky Chair as well.
Since then I have focused around all the other people who have came in and out of the USMjParty as State Chairs and kept up the websites and other duties.  Today we have Chairs in Colorado, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Utah , Vermont and Oregon as well as other reporting Chapters in Hawaii, Florida, California, Idaho, Virginia, Washington State, Texas, and there are others as well waiting for a Reporter.  Please see this LINK for a Directory.

Today we push for REPEAL of the CSA as well as other Federal and U.N. laws which continue to dominate the Law even though Cannabis has been “legalized” in 23+ States.  Federally it is still an illegal substance under U.N. law via the UN Convention on Psychotropic Substances (1971) .  These are all grave issues which need to be addressed along with the commercialization and pharmaceutical takeover of this plant, which is in effect ONE plant…Cannabis Sativa L.

REPEAL is the only path to true freedom of this plant.  If we let legalization and CSA Schedule II take it over we have lost the war for the common person who wishes to grow their own on their own property without taxation.

We are “FIGHTING FOR THE FREEDOM FROM PROHIBITION OF YOUR FREEDOM’S!”

Sheree Krider with Gatewood Galbraith at Terrapin Farm

Above:  Sheree Krider with Gatewood Galbraith @2010

 

Sheree

Above:  Sheree Krider @2012

 

Related Posts:

 

STATE CHAPTERS AND OTHER AFFILIATIONS

 

Time Magazine Reports: U.S. Marijuana Party

 

The United States Marijuana Party

 

The History Behind the U.S. Marijuana Party (with Marc Emery)

 

USMjParty on Wikipedia

 

Archives of historical information/sites

Kentucky to potientially become buds with bud


Posted by Julia Dake | Jan 28, 2016

Julia Dake, Staff Writer

No pun intended, but I think it’s high time weed became legalized in Kentucky.

Marijuana legalization has made some significant headway over the past few years, now legal for recreational use in four states and medicinal use in 25. Pretty soon another state, namely Kentucky, could be added to the list, either for medicinal and recreational use.

The Cannabis Freedom Act, a bill filed by state Senator Perry B. Clark of Louisville, would repeal Kentucky’s current ban on marijuana and legalize sales to people 21 and over, while those under age 21 could use it with a doctor’s prescription.

Taxes generated from the sale of marijuana would go toward a variety of government programs, including need-based scholarships to Kentucky students pursuing a college degrees. These taxes would also generate revenue for Support Educational Excellence in Kentucky (SEEK), which provides money for Kentucky’s school districts and grants to police departments to purchase gear.

In addition to the fact that we live in the 21st century, the tax revenue would greatly benefit Kentucky students seeking a college education. Tuition costs rise every year, putting college out of reach for some, and further stressing those already enrolled. So given the chance to alleviate some of the financial burden on students, why are some legislators so hesitant?

Legalizing weed would also promote tourism in Kentucky, seeing that we would be the first state on the Eastern seaboard where recreational marijuana would be legal. This would become an added incentive for people visiting our state, and would help the hospitality and tourism industries flourish. Not to mention, the state is ideally suited to grow marijuana. We used to be one of the top hemp producing states, which suggests that we just might be a pretty good at growing its more heady cousin.

Critics of marijuana legalization argue that not enough research has been done and that legalization could lead to the potential for marijuana monopolies, making it difficult to regulate. While these are valid concerns, proponents of the Cannabis Freedom Act have added clauses that would create a three-tier system, preventing any one entity from monopolizing all the facets of marijuana cultivation and sales. Senator Clark insists that marijuana would be regulated exactly like alcohol is, requiring an ID to purchase through licensed dealers.

The bottom line is Kentuckians are using marijuana every day and a lot of money is changing hands. So why not set it up so a portion of that money goes to help the state?

CONTINUE READING…

Indica, Sativa, Ruderalis – Did We Get It All Wrong?


By: Mitchell Colbert

Indica, Sativa, Ruderalis - Did We Get It All Wrong, Source: https://s3.amazonaws.com/leafly/content/sativa-indica-and-hybrid-whats-the-difference-between-cannabis-ty/primary.jpg

Since the 1970s, cannabis has been divided into three sub-species (often confused as different species), C. indica, C. sativa, C. ruderalis, with ruderalis largely being considered ‘wild cannabis,’ not fit for medicinal or recreational uses. A common lay-persons distinction is between marijuana, which is bred for high cannabinoid content, and hemp, which is bred for industrial uses like fiber.

Any of the three subspecies can be bred as a hemp or marijuana plant. John McPartland, a researcher affiliated with GW Pharmaceuticals, presented a study at the 2014 meeting of the International Cannabis Research Society,  proposing a new nomenclature for cannabis. The original report on O’Shaughnessy’s contains more information than I can reproduce here, and has a wonderful chart; it is definitely worth your time to read.

It seems Richard Evans Schultes, the man who created the original taxonomy for cannabis in the 1970s, misidentified a C. afghanica plant as a C. indica plant. That one mistake began 40 years of confusion which has only been dispelled by McPartland’s research this year.

McPartland was the first researcher to look at the genetic markers on the three subspecies of cannabis using the plant’s genome to conclusively identify where it originated. He also proved conclusively that they are all the same species, just different subspecies. As it turns out, C. sativa should have been identified as C. indica, because it originated in India (hence indica). C. indica should have been identified as C. afghanica, because it actually originated in Afghanistan. Finally, it seems that C. ruderalis is actually what people mean when they refer to C. sativa.

If that sounds confusing, refer to this handy table, or the original chart.

Cannabis Indica (Formerly Sativa)

Origin: India

Morphology: Taller (>1.5m) than their short and stocky Afghanica cousins, with sparser branches and less dense buds/flowers.

Physiology: Longer flowering time, between nine and fourteen weeks. Minimal frost tolerance with a moderate production of resin.

Chemistry: Much greater THC than CBD and other cannabinoids, this leads to the “head high” many users report.

Psychoactivity: Stimulating.

Cannabis Afghanica (Formerly Indica)

Origin: Central Asia (Afghanistan, Turkestan, Pakistan)

Morphology: Shorter (<1.5m) than Indica strains with dense branches with wider leaves, and much denser buds/flowers

Physiology: Shorter flowering time, as little as seven to nine weeks. Good frost tolerance with high resin production. Afghanica strains can be susceptible to mold due to how dense the buds and branches are.

Chemistry: More variable than Indica strains. THC is often still the predominant cannabinoid but some strains have 1:1 ratios and some may have even higher CBD than THC.

Psychoactivity: Sedating.

Cannabis Sativa (Formerly Ruderalis)

Origin: Usually feral or wild. From Europe or Central Asia.

Morphology: Variable, depending on origin.

Physiology: The flowering time is short and variable, many varieties exhibit autoflowering traits (flowering independently of sun cycles). Moderate frost tolerance with relatively low resin production.

Chemistry: More CBD than THC. Prominent terpenes include caryophyllene and myrcene, giving these strains a floral flavor and scent.

Psychoactivity: Usually lacking.

This new nomenclature should come to replace the old system, because it is grounded in the actual genetics of the plant and is scientifically sound. Despite that, it is likely that this new naming scheme will face resistance from cannabis users and those in the medical cannabis industry who will have become used to decades of convention firmly establishing an inaccurate taxonomy.

This is reminiscent of the Brontosaurus, a dinosaur that never existed but we were all taught in school it was real, or the former 9th planet of Pluto (now a ‘dwarf planet’). Sometimes science gets it wrong and it is up to modern scientists with better methods, like McPartland, to correct our old mistakes.

The difficult part will be getting mass acceptance of his newly proposed taxonomy. What seems likely is that a split may develop between academics and laymen, with academics adopting the new system and laymen continuing to adhere to the old system, at least for a few more years.

Perhaps in time C. afghanica, C. indica, and C. sativa will come into the vogue, but that largely depends on the willingness of the medical cannabis industry to adopt this new system and thus pass it on to the patients and growers. But it seems unlikely that the cannabis industry would wholeheartedly jump on board, given the risk that this new nomenclature could confuse patients who may be used to seeing only “indicas” and “sativas” on the shelf.

Time will tell.

CONTINUE READING…

Legislation to legalize recreational and medicinal marijuana is unlikely to be addressed during this legislative session in Kentucky


 

http://static.lakana.com/nxsglobal/tristatehomepage/photo/2016/01/27/5bdff8866c6a426bad10f0c8540e3323_6711047_ver1.0.jpg

 

Legislation to legalize recreational and medicinal marijuana is unlikely to be addressed during this legislative session in Kentucky.

That’s according to the committee’s chairman who’s handling the proposal. So what about the state’s hemp pilot program?

Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles was in Owensboro Wednesday. He says he expects 200 farmers to plant more than 4,000 acres this year.

That’s 4 times as much as in 2015.
Former Agriculture Commissioner James Comer started the program last year.  Quarles says officials are encouraging more local companies to use hemp grown in the Commonwealth –

"There are car manufacturers in Kentucky who use plant products similar to industrial hemp, but we’re hoping to pitch them on the idea of using Kentucky grown industrial hemp, not just for the manufacturing industry, but also other manufacturers across the state as well."

More than 100 farmers participated last year and twice as many are expected this year.  Kentucky is one of several states with a hemp pilot program.

CONTINUE READING…

Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research now publishing with the International Cannabinoid Research Society


Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

New Rochelle, NY, January 21, 2016–Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research the new peer-reviewed open access journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers, announces a new partnership with The International Cannabinoid Research Society. This new collaboration promotes the missions of the Journal and Society to further the advancement of cannabis and cannabinoid-related research.

This new relationship reflects the growing need for education and broader dissemination of cannabis and cannabinoid biology research in the scientific and medical community, particularly in the face of the widespread changes to cannabis regulation worldwide. For over 25 years, the International Cannabinoid Research Society (ICRS) has been a leading society dedicated to education and scientific research in all fields of cannabis and cannabinoid research.

"The ICRS is delighted to affiliate with Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research and to collaborate with Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., to further the Society’s educational objectives and support the dissemination of peer-reviewed cannabinoid research," says Cecilia J. Hillard, PhD, Executive Director of ICRS.

Led by Editor-in-Chief Daniele Piomelli, PhD, PharmD, Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research provides an important open access venue for publishing the scientific, medical, and psychosocial exploration of clinical cannabis, cannabinoids, and the endocannabinoid system. In addition to its collaboration with the ICRS, the Journal will publish the Society’s 2016 Symposium abstracts. The ICRS 26th Annual Symposium will take place on June 27-30th, 2016, at the Bukovina Terma Hotel in Bukowina Tatrza?ska, Poland.

"We are excited to partner with the ICRS because they have a long history of facilitating scientific discussion and research on cannabis and cannabinoid science," says Jordan Schilling, Director of Open Access Publishing at Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. "Similarly, both Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research and the ICRS bring a diverse group of scientists and practitioners together not only to advance the science but also to share, learn and ultimately provide better education on cannabinoid research for medical application."

###

About the International Cannabinoid Research Society

The International Cannabinoid Research Society (ICRS) is a non-political, non-religious organization dedicated to scientific research in all fields of the cannabinoids, ranging from biochemical, chemical and physiological studies of the endogenous cannabinoid system to studies of the abuse potential of recreational Cannabis. In addition to acting as a source for impartial information on Cannabis and the cannabinoids, the main role of the ICRS is to provide an open forum for researchers to meet and discuss their research. More information can be found the ICRS website.

About the Journal

Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research is the only peer-reviewed open access journal dedicated to the scientific, medical, and psychosocial exploration of clinical cannabis, cannabinoids, and the endocannabinoids system. Led by Editor-in-Chief Daniele Piomelli, PhD, PharmD, the Journal publishes a broad range of human and animal studies including basic and translational research; clinical studies; behavioral, social, and epidemiological issues; and ethical, legal, and regulatory controversies. Visit the Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research website to read the latest articles published in the Journal.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Journal of Palliative Medicine, Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, and Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology. Its biotechnology trade magazine, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News (GEN), was the first in its field and is today the industry’s most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm’s journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.

CONTINUE READING…

THE BALLAD OF “JOHN BOONE”


 

Sun King Labs Marijuana Grow House Tour

 

The Ballad Of "John Boone"

*This is a copy of a post that I put on the old site, when it existed.  This was the link.E-mail   I have added additional links at the bottom of articles about Johnny Boone.

Posted by Smkrider

Saturday, 04 October 2008 01:07

10/3/2008 8:00:18 PM

THE BALLAD OF “JOHN BOONE”

John "King of Pot, Godfather of Grass" Robert Boone

After having lived in Kentucky all of my life, I am almost embarrassed to say that until I listened to last nights news on a local channel in Louisville I had never even heard of “John Boone”.

According to the local news and “Americas Most Wanted”, Mr. Boone has had quite a reputation for the last 40 odd years.

http://www.amw.com/fugitives/case.cfm?id=59229

Mr. Boone’s first documented run-in with the law came in late October 1969, when the ATF in Louisville arrested him on charges of possessing untaxed spirits and whiskey. Since then, he has been charged with multiple felony counts which include cultivating marijuana, wanton endangerment, drug trafficking, firearms and others.

The article goes on to say that Mr. Boone is considered a pioneer in the marijuana business. He was one of the first growers to separate the male plants from female plants, making the marijuana much more potent.

In 1987, law enforcement arrested Mr. Boone for Unlawfully Manufacturing in Excess of 1,000 Kilos of Marijuana in the state of Minnesota where he was growing with seeds that were imported from Russia.

With that arrest approximately 75 other participants of the Cornbread Mafia were apprehended and many millions of dollars worth of Marijuana was confiscated throughout the Midwestern States.

Mr. Boone was sentenced to 20 years in Federal Prison but was paroled in 1999.

In late May of this year, the KSP Marijuana Radication Team flew over his farm and noticed what looked like Marijuana plants on a wagon. Allegedly there were more than 900 plants on that wagon!

After obtaining a search warrant the KSPMRT and DEA Task Force discovered over 2,400 Marijuana plants.

According to the reports, Mr. Boone keeps a number of “Rottweiler’s” on his property which he allegedly had their “vocal chords” cut, in order to alleviate the noise of a pack of dogs approaching – to anyone that might stray onto his property. There are even stories of “rattlesnakes tied to posts around Boone’s Marijuana barns”…

Not even a $10,000.00 reward could get anyone in the area to “fess up” to knowing Mr. Boone.

OMERTA is subscribed to by many people in KY. The belief that “To never harm another” among other things, is a type of religious belief to these people.

Marshals in Louisville, KY believe that he is in Marion County KY. He was last seen in Raywick, KY and Campbellsville, KY. He also has property in Belize.

With the belief of “MERTA” among the Kentucky natives, it is unlikely that he will be turned in for the reward money.

Only time will tell if Mr. Boone will face the ever growing Government conspiracy against him.

The “Godfather of Grass” will remain a ghost in the wind, unless the law just happens upon him.

I, myself, have not seen anything to suggest that he is a dangerous person, just one who believes in what he believes in, and vow’s to “NEVER HARM ANOTHER”

If the law does catch up with him, he is looking at spending the rest of his life behind bars.

Isn’t it ironic that many violent offenders are being let out of Kentucky prisons at this time to accommodate overcrowding?

By: Sheree Krider

Share Link: Share Link: Bookmark Google Yahoo MyWeb Del.icio.us Facebook Myspace Reddit Technorati Stumble Upon Blinklist Newsvine Slashdot Yahoo Bookmarks myAOL MSN Live

Last Updated on Sunday, 05 December 2010 00:44

Additional Links of information:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cornbread_Mafia

https://vimeo.com/24856158

http://www.chattanoogan.com/2010/11/30/189503/Roy-Exum-The-Legend-Of-Johnny-Boone.aspx

http://kentuckymarijuanaparty.com/2012/05/31/tale-of-kentuckys-king-of-pot-hits-greenpoint/

https://grlbhvingbadly.wordpress.com/2008/10/03/stoners-beware-feds-wasting-taxpayer-moneyagain/

https://www.facebook.com/CornbreadMafia

Remove Marijuana from the Controlled Substances Act & End Cannabis Prohibition


marijuana-pixabay8_large

Petition by Deschedule 2016

To be delivered to The United States House of Representatives, The United States Senate, and President Barack Obama

Issue an Executive Order directing the Department of Justice and the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) to cease enforcing codes under the Controlled Substances Act relating to marijuana and its cannabinoids.
Pass legislation to:
• Amend the Controlled Substances Act to remove marijuana and its cannabinoids from the schedule of controlled substances;
• Remove restrictions for import and export of marijuana, including viable seed;
• Transfer authority for cannabis regulation and licensing to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), designating it as an agricultural crop;
• Amend Section 7606 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 to remove the “for research purposes only” provision to permit for legal personal and commercial hemp cultivation nationwide.
Join Canada, Mexico and other countries to call for the end of global marijuana prohibition during the United Nation’s General Assembly Special Session on the World Drug Problem, April 19-21, 2016 in New York.

CONTINUE READING…..

SIGN PETITITION HERE…

Court official hears allegations against marijuana activist


Bill Downing (right) appeared in court in Brighton with his attorneys Steven S. Epstein, left, and John G. Swomley.

Downing says he’s being singled out over cannabis-oil sale

By Milton J. Valencia Globe Staff  January 19, 2016

One of the state’s leading proponents for the legalization of marijuana — who now faces possible criminal drug distribution charges for selling a cannabis-based oil — told a clerk magistrate Tuesday that he believed he was selling a legal product known as CBD, recognized across the country for its medical benefits.

“I [believed it] then, and I still do now,” a defiant Bill Downing said under questioning during a hearing at Boston Municipal Court in Brighton.

Boston police have sought to charge Downing, 57, with nine counts of distribution of a Class D drug, marijuana, or a Class C drug, THC, out of a store he operated in Allston, called CBD Please. Downing sold a liquid form of CBD by the gram to undercover Boston police officers on several occasions in late 2014 and early 2015.

When Downing testified, he cited the manufacturer’s guide for the product he was selling, which reads, “100 percent legal in all 50 states.” His lawyers argued that police singled Downing out, even though other companies in Massachusetts have sold the same product.

State chemists who tested the CBD sold by Downing to the undercover officers found traces of THC, the psychoactive element in marijuana, but chemists differed on whether to classify the product as a Class C or a Class D drug.

View Story

Police seek charges against marijuana legalization advocate

Bill Downing’s lawyer says it’s retaliation for criticism of the state’s regulation of the medical marijuana industry.

Clerk Magistrate Stephen Borelli will now decide whether police had probable cause to charge Downing, and whether the case should proceed in court.

During a hearing Tuesday, Lawyers for Downing said Boston police targeted their client for his loud criticism of the state’s medical marijuana industry. Downing formerly operated the Reading-based Yankee Care Givers to provide cannabis products to medical marijuana patients, but state officials shut that business down, saying he could not provide the products to more than one patient under medical marijuana laws approved in 2012.

Downing, a member of the board of directors for the Massachusetts Cannabis Reform Coalition, has also helped organize the annual marijuana rally on the Boston Common, and he is the treasurer for Bay State Repeal, one of the groups that pushed to put a marijuana legalization measure on the 2016 ballot.

In December 2014, Downing opened CDB Please to sell non-psychoactive cannabis-based products for medical use. He said in press releases and in published news reports at the time that he wanted to provide as much support for medical marijuana use that is allowed under state law.

Kenneth Conley, a Boston police detective, testified during the hearing Tuesday that his superiors wanted him to investigate Downing after reading about the business in the Boston Globe in December 2014.

Conley said he went to the store in an undercover role, and inquired about CDB oil.

“I told him I wasn’t feeling well, lower back pain,” Conley said. “I told him I was having trouble sleeping and I didn’t like smoking marijuana, and he told me the best thing for me was the oil.”

Conley said he paid $40 for the gram of oil. On other occasions, undercover police officers paid $30, or $25.

Conley said a state chemist detected THC when testing the oil. Authorities later seized hundreds of grams of oil and other products, such as hemp shampoo and conditioner, during a raid of Downing’s business and home.

Lawyers for Downing argued that the THC levels in the products are so minimal that the products are exempt from the state law that criminalizes products containing more than 2½ percent THC. One of the lawyers, John Swomley, noted that the chemists had to test nearly the entire gram of liquid oil each time to detect any THC.

Another lawyer, Stephen Epstein, said the CDB Downing sold came from Colorado, and it would not be classified as a controlled substance under US law.

“It’s speculation . . . to believe there was any useable amount of [THC] in anything that tested positive for THC,” he said. Downing “was undertaking a lawful business. What he was doing was perfectly legal, and no crime was committed.”

Borelli invited the lawyers to submit further legal arguments in writing, and said he could issue a decision next week.

Milton J. Valencia can be reached at mvalencia@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @miltonvalencia.

CONTINUE READING…

DOJ: Local man facing 40 years in prison for selling marijuana


Sun King Labs Marijuana Grow House Tour

 

By KOMO Staff Friday, January 15th 2016

TACOMA, Wash. — A South Sound man could potentially spend the next 40 years in prison after he was convicted Friday of illegally growing and selling marijuana.

Prosecutors say 37-year-old Lance Edward Gloor and his business partner opened four illegal marijuana dispensaries throughout Puget Sound. The men claimed the shops were non-profit medical dispensaries, but in reality Gloor was making millions of dollars and breaking state laws, according to prosecutors.

Prior to opening the shops, Gloor was arrested in 2010 when police searched his home and found more than 70 pot plants and a firearm.

In 2011, federal and state law enforcement teamed up to investigate Gloor and his dispensaries. He told police he was getting out of the marijuana business, but in reality he continued to operate two of the four businesses while attempting to hide his role in the operation, prosecutors say.

On Friday, a jury found Gloor guilty of conspiracy to distribute marijuana and manufacturing marijuana. The jury couldn’t reach a verdict on a money laundering charge, and they acquitted Gloor of possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime.

Gloor is facing a mandatory minimum sentence of five to 40 years in prison, according to the Department of Justice. He will officially be sentenced on April 15.

CONTINUE READING…

Update: 16 RS; BR 161, has become sb 13, "Kentucky Cannabis Freedom Act"


 

SB13 Ky Cannabis Freedom Act

SB13/CI/LM (BR161) – P. Clark
AN ACT relating to the regulation of cannabis and making an appropriation therefor.
Establish KRS Chapter 245 to regulate the cultivation, testing, processing, taxing, and sale of marijuana to persons aged twenty-one years and older; amend various sections to conform; repeal KRS 218A.1421, KRS 218A.1422, and KRS 218A.1423.

Jan 06, 2016 – introduced in Senate
Jan 07, 2016 – to Licensing, Occupations, & Administrative Regulations (S)

PLEASE CONTINUE TO CALL, FAX, MAIL, EMAIL AND VISIT YOUR REPRESENTATIVES AND URGE THEM TO SUPPORT SEN. PERRY B. CLARK’s “CANNABIS FREEDOM ACT” ! 

THIS IS THE ONLY WAY TO MORALLY REPEAL CANNABIS PROHIBITION AND RETURN THIS PLANT TO IT’s PEOPLE!

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