I’m a professional making over $100k a year and I smoke lots of high-grade marijuana every single day. Is this unusual? Are there others like me?


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Hello, I just found this post, and I couldn’t help myself but to add a comment!

I have used Cannabis all of my adult life and am grateful for it. I have major depression and anxiety along with other health problems which I wont elaborate on here. However, none of them were caused by Cannabis and most came before it.

I am not an “educated” person, as I only have a High School Diploma. I worked in clerical/secretarial/office positions until I was 33 full time and after that part time and I also had 2 children. I learned a lot from working – that is where most of my education came.

With that meager education I managed to bring together a little piece of the World called – “The U.S. Marijuana Party”. I own and maintain the websites and am the organizer. I have 20+ blogs, websites which “Fight for the Freedom from Prohibition of Your Freedoms”!!!

I obtained the Trademarks to U.S. Marijuana Party as well as ShereeKrider in 2015.

NO, I do not make any money at this. At least I haven’t yet. But that was never the reason for doing any of this. It was a belief and the fact that I care for people, about people and about what happens to them. I like to say what I believe and this has given me the way to do that.

Maybe, at some point, there will come a time when there will be money made for me but I’m not banking on that. If I did start to get an income from it I would make it easier to help a few people!

My point in telling you all this is that not all success in this life can be measured by the amount of money that you make. Success is when you succeed at accomplishing something that helps make the world a little bit better, or help someone who needs it.

As far as successful potheads go I think Marc Emery had a good go of it – If only he had stopped while he was ahead!

God Bless Them – There’s nothing like a successful Cannabis business person!

Myself, I’m holding out for REPEAL OF PROHIBITION!

ShereeKrider


Anonymous

Updated Jan 27, 2014

Many, many people live just like you.  There always have been, and there always will be.  I’ve known highly paid, highly functioning, and highly regarded bankers, corporate lawyers, and professors just like you.
I was in the same situation just 6 months ago.  Of course, there are plenty of people who have more than 3 or 4 drinks every day, and those people are not judged nearly as harshly — if at all — by most societies.  Social and cultural convention can be funny and at times seemingly arbitrary.  In Singapore, for instance, the law on the books is death by hanging for drug use/sale.  In Hong Kong, it’s 7 years in jail though that’s not strictly enforced, and it’s not too difficult to get — though quality isn’t up to par with the States.
Like frequent enjoyment of any pleasure, pros and cons will differ by individual, but it’s definitely not a terrible life.
Here were my pros and cons before I quit for good many months ago:
From: Dave Cheng’s answer to What’s it like to be a heavy user of marijuana on a regular basis?

Benefits:

  • The single biggest advantage to drug addiction is best described in Get Him to the Greek: it makes everything else insignificant.  All of your worries and concerns are replaced by: “when can I get high?”  This sounds terrible but can actually be fantastic.  If I have weed, I don’t feel the need to have plans every weekend and am not terribly disappointed if plans fall through.  If something better than getting stoned by myself comes up, great, but no big deal if not.
  • Instant relief for stress and pain, both mental and physical
  • Enhancement of physical pleasures.  I am high for more than half my waking hours, and I really enjoy being high.  This, like most subjective experiences, will differ based on the individual, strand, social and cultural context, etc. but for me, food tastes better, music sounds better, movies and TV are more enjoyable, books are more engaging, and most other things just seem more interesting.
  • Can aid in creativity and focus in the right situation.  Most of my Quora answers have been written while high.
  • Lowers inhibitions (e.g., more likely to open up to friends or random strangers on Quora about your weed habit)
  • Makes time pass faster by keeping you relaxed and entertained (albeit mildly) during moments of boredom and/or frustration.
  • Like all other hobbies, especially illicit ones, it lets you make friends with those who share your proclivities.  The same way being a nicotine addict gives you the excuse to go outside for air and meet your fellow smokers outside of bars.  There is an instant camaraderie and an “us vs. the squares” mentality.
  • Guilty thrill in having a (mostly) harmless secret from coworkers, friends, lovers, and family.  Possessing a part of yourself that most people will never glimpse.  Before sharing this on Quora, only 3-5 people in the world would have suspected the depths of my habit.  Those ~5 people do not include my wife or any of my family members, some of whom know I smoke but would not have come close to guessing how often.
  • Social and personal perception (i.e., self-identifying) as: anti-establishment, anti-convention, laid-back, peaceful, pleasure-seeking and life-loving

Costs:

  • Social stigma and negative stereotypes: a lot of people are going to judge based on their preconceived notions.  Social and personal perception as: lazy, unmotivated, lacking in discipline and self-control, directionless, hedonistic, nihilistic
  • Stress and hassle associated with keeping your secret from coworkers, friends, lovers, and family.  Lying to the people you are closest to and then feeling less close to them because you have to lie to them.
  • Risk of legal punishment and/or social disgrace
  • Depending on the strand and situation, occasionally can lead to increased anxiety and slight paranoia (not as acute or as often for me nowadays as when I first began smoking)
  • Lowers inhibitions (e.g., more likely to snack or watch TV to excess)
  • Severely impaired performance for: social interactions, physically-demanding activities, mentally-demanding activities that require intense focus and coherence.  While high, I find it much more difficult (though not impossible) to: mingle with unfamiliar people; jog or lift weights; and design/create new excel spreadsheets without a good model or template.
  • Getting bored more easily when sober (i.e., this is interesting but I could be stoned right now).  Becoming a more boring person as a result (boredom is boring).
  • Food, entertainment, and special occasions while sober seem less special and less enjoyable by comparison.  Pleasure and pain are relative.  Whenever I enjoy a mind-blowingly great meal, movie, or session of intercourse while sober, a small part of me regrets not being high for it.
  • When you are smoking a lot, each time you get high is less special
  • Pot hangovers.  While not nearly as bad as alcohol-induced ones, there is a general grogginess/haziness that can be long-lasting
  • Temporary damage to mental and physical health (unless we’re talking about lungs depending on how you’re smoking, in which case: possibly permanent damage)
  • Risk of addiction, albeit less than alcohol and many other drugs
  • You want things less.  Nothing is that big of a deal because in a few hours, you can still go get high and have a great time.  It’s ok if there’s nothing in the fridge or no time to cook because the most mediocre take-out in the world will taste fantastic if I smoke enough beforehand.

Full background in original answer: Dave Cheng’s answer to What’s it like to be a heavy user of marijuana on a regular basis?

 

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Toronto dispensaries once owned by the Prince of Pot will all shut down this weekend


A former Cannabis Culture location, renamed the Village Dispensary, on Church Street will close its doors this weekend.

 

After police raids, former owner Jodie Emery says government is clearing way for legal producers

CBC News Posted: Apr 07, 2017 11:20 PM ET Last Updated: Apr 08, 2017 10:20 AM ET

The last of the former Cannabis Culture dispensaries in Toronto, once synonymous with Marc and Jodie Emery, will close this weekend after becoming a frequent target of police raids — a consequence the marijuana activists blame on the government’s support of licensed producers. 

The dispensaries were making pot available in contravention of the law, until recreational marijuana is actually legalized by the government, a process expected to happen in July 2018.

But former owner Jodie Emery said she believes dispensaries in Toronto have been raided more frequently in the past year because the federal Liberals want to keep the recreational weed market clear for the licensed producers already selling medical marijuana. 

“We’re seeing a government and corporate push to exclude the pioneers, to literally put us in handcuffs and throw us into cages while they move in to open up their own shops to sell their own pot.”

Mtl Pot Dispensaries 20161215

Jodie Emery, right, said the raids on recreational dispensaries have punished the activists who have fought for legalization. (Paul Chiasson/Canadian Press)

The pioneers of pot

The Emerys divested themselves of their Cannabis Culture shops in Toronto on March 10, as part of their $30,000 bail conditions on possession and drug trafficking charges. 

Jodie Emery said the couple decided to open the storefronts to fund their activism — and because she believed the franchise model would be successful once Ottawa legalized pot. 

“We wanted to have our spot in this industry, because we’ve earned it and we deserve it …after 10 years of being broke and suffering through prison and court,” she said.

Jamie McConnell, Cannabis Culture general manager

Jamie McConnell, the owner at the Village Dispensary, said he’ll keep doing this somewhere else. (CBC)

The 461 Church St. location was reborn as the Village Cannabis Dispensary after the Emerys sold it to Jamie McConnell, the store’s former manager.

McConnell said his landlord will no longer rent to the dispensary, something he said has happened because of pressure from the police raids and the city.

“I was planning on being here forever, my goal was jail or the landlord locking me out. It looks like the landlord locked me out.”

He said he believes it’s better to have marijuana “activists and users” sell the products than licensed producers, because they know first-hand what makes a quality product.

“I don’t know what the government’s going to do as far as legalization, but I’m not going to stop.”

Legal producers also took risks: lawyer

But Andrea Hill, a corporate and securities lawyer with the firm SkyLaw who represents several regulated marijuana firms, said the dispensaries have been shut down because what they’re doing is illegal. It has nothing to do with the regulated medical marijuana industry.

And those licensed producers have been pioneers in the industry as well, she said. 

“They’ve put themselves on the line just as much as anyone else,” the lawyer said. “If a business is operating outside of the law and it can’t make it and it has to shut down I think that means that the law wins — and that people who play by the rules win, at the end of the day. I think that’s a good thing.

CANADA MARIJUANA/REGULATIONS

The Liberal government is expected to make recreational pot legal by July 1, 2018. (Julie Gordon/Reuters)

Corrections
  • An earlier version of this story indicated that recreational marijuana is expected to be legalized by the federal government this July. In fact, it is expected in July 2018.

    Apr 08, 2017 8:23 AM ET

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Teen denied double-lung transplant after smoking marijuana


Riley Hancey, 19, was denied a double-lung transplant because of his marijuana use. (Source: KSL via CNN)

 

Salt Lake City, UT (KSL/CNN) — Up until Thanksgiving, Riley Hancey led a pretty normal life; the 19-year-old was an avid skier, river runner and biker. But then a severe form of pneumonia left him with failing lungs and nowhere to turn for help.

Within 10 days of being hospitalized, Riley Hancey’s lungs collapsed and his doctors told him he needed a double-lung transplant to live.

But Mark Hancey, Riley Hancey’s father, said because his son tested positive for THC – the chief intoxicant in marijuana – he was denied a spot on the transplant list at University of Utah Hospital.

“Riley did smoke marijuana on Thanksgiving night with his friends,” Mark Hancey, told KSL Monday. “It’s not like he’s a smoker for 30 years and (had) deteriorating lungs because of that.”

In fact, Mark Hancey said his son had been drug-free for a year prior to his illness.

Officials at the University of Utah could not talk specifically about Riley’s case, but they issued a written statement to KSL saying University Hospital follows international guidelines for transplants and evaluates cases individually.

“We do not transplant organs in patients with active alcohol, tobacco or illicit drug use or dependencies until these issues are addressed, as these substances are contraindicated for a transplant,” the statement said.

Age and other medical conditions may also exclude patients from the list, the statement said.

According to Mark Hancey, a doctor told his son, “You will die. You better get your affairs in order,” and the young man broke down in tears.

Family members set about scouring the country for a hospital willing to do the transplant. Two months ago, the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania agreed.

Mark Hancey said his son was flown to Philadelphia on medical transport.

“I looked at Riley and I thought, ‘Oh my gosh, this poor soul looks like death,'” Mark Hancey said.

Twelve days ago, doctors gave Riley Hancey two donor lungs.

“He looked so healthy,” Mark Hancey said. “It made all the difference, and he still looks healthy. … He still fighting, and he’s doing well.”

Riley Hancey remained under sedation Monday and hasn’t communicated a lot with anyone yet. Mark Hancey said his son will recover at the hospital in Philadelphia for a year, with family members visiting for support.

Mark Hancey said doctors are optimistic that Riley Hancey will be able to return to many of his favorite activities after a lot of recovery.

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