All posts by ShereeKrider

U.S. Marijuana Party - Organizer U.S. Marijuana Party Kentucky Sheree Krider, LLC

Whitehouse Press Release– I have a question on medical marijuana…


 

marijuana

February 23, 2017

 

A LINK TO THE ENTIRE PRESS BRIEFING HERE

I have a question on medical marijuana.  Our state voters passed a medical marijuana amendment in November.  Now we’re in conflict with federal law, as many other states are.  The Obama administration kind of chose not to strictly enforce those federal marijuana laws.  My question to you is:  With Jeff Sessions over at the Department of Justice as AG, what’s going to be the Trump administration’s position on marijuana legalization where it’s in a state-federal conflict like this?

MR. SPICER:  Thanks, Roby.  There’s two distinct issues here: medical marijuana and recreational marijuana.  

I think medical marijuana, I’ve said before that the President understands the pain and suffering that many people go through who are facing especially terminal diseases and the comfort that some of these drugs, including medical marijuana, can bring to them.  And that’s one that Congress, through a rider in 2011 — looking for a little help — I think put in an appropriations bill saying the Department of Justice wouldn’t be funded to go after those folks.  

There is a big difference between that and recreational marijuana.  And I think that when you see something like the opioid addiction crisis blossoming in so many states around this country, the last thing that we should be doing is encouraging people.  There is still a federal law that we need to abide by in terms of the medical — when it comes to recreational marijuana and other drugs of that nature.  

So I think there’s a big difference between medical marijuana, which states have a — the states where it’s allowed, in accordance with the appropriations rider, have set forth a process to administer and regulate that usage, versus recreational marijuana.  That’s a very, very different subject.

Shannon.

Q    What does that mean in terms of policy?  A follow-up, Sean.  What does that mean in terms of policy?

MR. SPICER:  Shannon.  Glenn, this isn’t a TV program.  We’re going to —

Q    What is the Justice Department going to do?

MR. SPICER:  Okay, you don’t get to just yell out questions.  We’re going to raise our hands like big boys and girls.

Q    Why don’t you answer the question, though?

MR. SPICER:  Because it’s not your job to just yell out questions.  

Shannon, please go.

Q    Okay.  Well, first, on the manufacturing summit, was the AFL-CIO invited?  And then, yeah, I did want to follow up on this medical marijuana question.  So is the federal government then going to take some sort of action around this recreational marijuana in some of these states?

MR. SPICER:  Well, I think that’s a question for the Department of Justice. I do believe that you’ll see greater enforcement of it.  Because again, there’s a big difference between the medical use which Congress has, through an appropriations rider in 2014, made very clear what their intent was in terms of how the Department of Justice would handle that issue.  That’s very different than the recreational use, which is something the Department of Justice I think will be further looking into. 

I’m sorry, Shannon, what was the first part?

Q    Was the AFL-CIO invited to the manufacturing meeting today with the CFOs?  Because they are part of this manufacturing —

MR. SPICER:  Right.  I think this was just focused on people who actually — they were not, I don’t believe, part of this one.  As you know, that we’ve had union representation at other meetings.  I think this was specifically for people who are hiring people and the impediments that they’re having to create additional jobs, hire more people.  And obviously, while the President values their opinion — and that’s why they’ve been involved in some of the past — this was specifically a manufacturing — people who hire people, who manufacture, who grow the economy, who grow jobs.  And that is a vastly different situation.

SOURCE

White House: Feds will step up marijuana law enforcement


By Kevin Liptak, CNN White House Producer

Updated 6:52 PM ET, Thu February 23, 2017

Washington (CNN)The White House said Thursday it expects law enforcement agents to enforce federal marijuana laws when they come into conflict with states where recreational use of the drug is permitted.

“I do believe you will see greater enforcement of it,” White House press secretary Sean Spicer said regarding federal drug laws, which still list marijuana as an illegal substance.

That’s a reversal from the Obama administration’s stance, which laid out in an official memo that the federal government wouldn’t interfere in states where nonmedical use of marijuana is allowed.

    That guidance was issued after two states — Colorado and Washington — voted to legalize recreational use of marijuana. Obama said in the immediate aftermath of those votes that the federal government had “bigger fish to fry” than cracking down on marijuana use in states where it’s considered legal.

    Most drug enforcement operations are carried out by state and local authorities, with little involvement by the federal government. Enforcing marijuana laws has been considered a lower priority for federal drug agents, who have remained focused on curbing narcotics trafficking and combating a nationwide epidemic of opioid abuse.

    Spicer on Thursday, however, linked marijuana use with the widespread abuse of painkillers, suggesting that allowing recreational use of marijuana could be interpreted as condoning drug use more widely.

    “When you see something like the opioid addiction crisis blossoming in so many states around this country, the last thing we should be doing is encouraging people,” Spicer said. “There is still a federal law that we need to abide by when it comes to recreational marijuana and drugs of that nature.”

    He was careful to distinguish between use of medical marijuana and recreational marijuana. President Donald Trump, he said, understood that marijuana could help ease suffering for patients with terminal illnesses.

    Trump took varying positions on marijuana during his campaign for president. He said during remarks in June 2015 that legal recreational use was “bad,” adding he felt “strongly about it.”

    But later that year he suggested the issue should be decided by individual states and not by the federal government.

    “In terms of marijuana and legalization, I think that should be a state issue, state-by-state,” he said in Nevada in October 2015.

    He’s remained staunchly supportive of medical marijuana, telling Fox News host Bill O’Reilly he was “in favor of medical marijuana 100%.”

    “I know people that have serious problems and they did that they really — it really does help them,” he said.

    CONTINUE READING….

    iN hONOR OF rICHARD jAMES rAWLINGS


    Richard James Rawlings with Gatewood Galbraith in Glasgow, Kentucky 2011

    The U.S. Marijuana Party, did, on February 24, 2013, loose one of its first and most influential Presidents, 

    Second only to Loretta Nall, who preceded him as the first President of the USMJParty in 2002.

    Richard James Rawlings took the head of the table in 2005 after Ms. Nall’s resignation.

    He actively ran for Congress in Peoria Illinois several times.  He promoted many legalization activities in the Peoria area of Illinois and attended many more events in various states until he began to become ill in 2009-10.

    It was not until July of 2012 that he was diagnosed with Stage 4 Throat, Lung and Adrenal Cancer.

    At the age of 51, he died peacefully at his mother’s home where we had resided since shortly after his hospitalization in Glasgow Kentucky for two weeks in July 2012 where he received the diagnosis and the surgery for the trach which he would continue to wear until the night of his death when I removed it.

    All of his family were with him almost constantly during the last two weeks.  And I am forever grateful to them for all their support to me during this most difficult time.

    His death broke my Heart.  We were not only coworkers, friends and companions – we were lovers and partners.

    He will never be forgotten by me and I know the same sentiment holds true with all of his family, friends and followers.

    May what he stood for never be forgotten:  Repeal of Hemp/Marijuana/Cannabis Laws at best or Legalization at least.

    Richard J. Rawlings with his family at TJ Samson Hospital, Glasgow, Kentucky, in July of 2012
    Richard J. Rawlings and Sheree Krider at Richard’s Mother’s house in Peoria, IL in January of 2013.

    May He Rest In Peace

    Sheree Krider

     

    Richard and his plant

     

    Ode to the Hemp

    WE COME TOGETHER TODAY TO PRAISE YOUR ALMIGHTY
    GIFTS TO US…
    YOU HAVE GIVEN US LIGHT FOR WARMTH,
    MEADOWS OF FRESH FLOWERS,
    AND HERBS,TO KEEP UP HEALTHY,
    YOU GAVE US DARK TO SLEEP AND TO REST OUR
    WEARY HEARTS AND MINDS FOR ANOTHER DAY,
    YOU GAVE US BROTHERS AND SISTERS TO LOVE US,
    AND CHILDREN TO CARRY ON OUR NEVER-ENDING
    ENDEAVORS – TO CARRY OUT YOUR WILL ,
    AS WE KNOW WE WILL NEVER ACCOMPLISH
    THIS ALONE.
    YOU GIVE US INTELLIGENCE TO BE ABLE TO
    SEPARATE THE GOOD FROM THE EVIL,
    DEAR FATHER IN HEAVEN,
    GIVE US THIS DAY, OUR DAILY BREAD,
    AND FORGIVE US OUR SINS,
    AS WE FORGIVE ALL OTHERS,
    AND
    GIVE US THE STRENGTH, TO CARRY ON,
    TO RECTIFY THE EVIL THAT TO WHICH WE HAVE
    SUCCUMB,
    TO BRING BACK THE MEADOWS,
    THE FLOWERS AND TREE’S,
    TO CONTINUE TO HEAR THE BIRD’S AND BEE’S!
    BLESS THE HEMP LORD, AND KEEP IT STRONG,
    AND ENABLE US, TO CARRY ON…

    AMEN

    @ShereeKrider

    *Dedicated with Love to Richard J. Rawlings…USMJParty

    https://usmjpartyil.wordpress.com/2013/01/27/ode-to-the-hemp/

    https://usmjpartyil.wordpress.com/2013/03/01/in-honor-of-richard-james-rawlings-1961-2013/

    "feral hog apocalypse," Texas approves drastic measures (Why is this important? )


    Image result for feral hogs ky

     

    NORTH TEXAS — Announcing the “feral hog apocalypse” is within reach, Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller has approved of the first pesticide targeting wild pigs, CBS Dallas reports

    The estimated 2.5 million feral hogs in Texas cost an estimated $50 million a year in damage to Texas agriculture, according to the Austin American-Statesman. In addition to the damage to crops and livestock tanks, hogs cost untold damage to suburban yards. 

    Miller said they will use the pesticide, Kaput Feral Hog Lure, as bait food laced with warfarin which is the same drug used to kill rats. It can also be prescribed by doctors, in smaller doses, to prevent blood clots

    But the move has upset hunters, who’ve gathered more than 1,200 signatures in opposition within two days.

    “We don’t think poison is the way to go,” said Eydin Hansen, Vice President of the Texas Hog Hunters Association.

    He prefers hunting and trapping methods to control the invasive species.

    Hansen has been hunting hogs since he was 16.

    “It’s a way to feed your family,” he said.

    He worries soon he won’t want to take that risk.

    “If this hog is poisoned, do I want to feed it to my family? I can tell you, I don’t.”

    Hunters and conservationists are afraid other animals may be exposed to toxin.

    “If a hog dies, what eats it? Coyotes, buzzards…” said Hansen. “We’re gonna affect possibly the whole ecosystem.”

    The Kaput product website claims its low toxicity decreases that risk.

    The company has also created a bait station to disseminate it that limits access to other wildlife.

    Hansen remains skeptical.

    “I personally don’t think it’s going to work,” he said.

    Miller told the state, in light of the product’s approval, his department would no longer need $900,000 earmarked for feral hog control research.

    As a state senator, Miller authored legislation that allowed for the shooting of wild hogs from helicopters. Now, more than 27,000 wild pigs are killed that way, according to the Austin American-Statesman. 

    PLEASE CONTINUE READING… (VIDEO)

    Queens of the Stoned Age


     

    There are a thousand ways to buy weed in New York City, but the Green Angels devised a novel strategy for standing out: They hired models to be their dealers. In the eight years since the group was founded—by a blonde, blue-eyed Mormon ex-model—they’ve never been busted, and the business has grown into a multimillion-dollar operation. Suketu Mehta spent months embedded with them at their headquarters and out on their delivery routes to see where this great experiment in American entrepreneurship might lead.

    A friend tells me about the Green Angels, a collective of about 30 models turned high-end-weed dealers, and he introduces me to the group’s leader, Honey. The first time we speak, in the spring of 2015, she comes to my house in Greenwich Village and we talk for six hours.

    She is 27 and several months pregnant. Her belly is showing, a little, under her black top and over her black patterned stockings. But her face is still as fresh as hay, sunlight, the idea the rest of the world has about the American West, where she was born—she’s an excommunicated Mormon from the Rocky Mountains. Honey is not her real name; it’s a pseudonym she chose for this article. She is over six feet tall, blonde, and blue-eyed. Patrick Demarchelier took photos of her when she was a teenager. She still does some modeling. Now that she’s pregnant, I tell her, she should do maternity modeling.

    “Why would I do that when I can make $6,000 a day just watching TV?” she asks.

    Honey started the business in 2009. When she began dealing, she would get an ounce from a guy in Union Square, then take it to her apartment and divide it into smaller quantities for sale. She bought a vacuum sealer from Bed Bath & Beyond to make the little bags her product came in airtight. She tells me that part of her research was watching CNN specials on the drug war to find out how dealers got busted.

    Today her total expenses average more than $300,000 a month for the product, plus around $30,000 for cabs, cell phones, rent for various safe houses, and other administrative costs. She makes a profit of $27,000 a week. “I like seeing a pile of cash in my living room,” she says.

    PLEASE CONTINUE READING…

    ‘America Is Full Of Hypocrites’: Marijuana Lifer John Knock Speaks Out


    By Tess Allen  |  Feb 20, 2017

    'America Is Full Of Hypocrites': Marijuana Lifer John Knock Speaks Out

    Days after John Knock learned that his application for clemency had been denied – meaning he would have to continue serving out two life sentences plus 20 years for a non-violent cannabis offense – he found himself transfixed by a story on NPR.

    “There was [someone on the radio] talking about how they’re going to handle the marijuana distribution stores in Pennsylvania, and here I am doing a life sentence for marijuana,” Knock told Civilized from the federal penitentiary in Pennsylvania where he currently resides.

    “It was just one of those wakeup moments, where you realize that America’s idea of justice is only their idea. It is not true justice.”

    Knock, a first-time offender with no history of violence or drug abuse, was indicted in 1994 in the Northern District of Florida on charges of conspiracy to money launder and to import and distribute marijuana.

    thumbnail JohnKnock

    John Knock (center) with his wife and son.

    Now a senior citizen at 70, Knock had high hopes he would be included in former US president Barack Obama’s final round of commutations for nonviolent drug offenders, a move that brought the total number of clemencies during his presidency to 1,715.

    But Knock was denied, along with uncounted other ‘marijuana lifers’, in a decision-making process that activist Cheri Sicard of the Marijuana Lifer Project has deemed completely nonsensical.

    Knock has now been incarcerated for more than 20 years, and every day faces the sickly ironic reality that he may die in prison while the cannabis legalization movement makes greater and greater strides outside his permanent four walls.

    “We’re sitting in here watching as [state after state] legalizes… and there are people in here doing life for pot, an accepted recreational and medical drug in the majority of the states in America,” said Knock. “When are they going to recognize that?”

    Like most others locked up for life for nonviolent cannabis crimes, Knock believes greater public awareness about the issue would go a long way. He’s certain that most people don’t even know ‘marijuana lifers’ exist.

    “My sister runs LifeForPot.com, and whenever she talks to people [about my case], they say: ‘He’s got a life sentence for marijuana? There must be something other than that. Somebody must have died.’ And that’s just not the case,” said Knock.

    “Society has to be the one to say ‘now wait a minute’… to realize that the War on Drugs is actually a militaristic [effort] against an open society.”

    There’s not much that can be done to change things on the part of “somebody locked in a room”, said Knock, which is why cannabis advocates on the outside need to make clemency a part of their activism platforms.                   

    “I read an article the other day about a gym opening in San Francisco that’s going to utilize marijuana in their workout [regimes] because it helps people concentrate and eliminate the pain of the workout,” Knock told Civilized.

    When asked what this news signified to him, Knock replied: “America is full of hypocrites.”

    CONTINUE READING…

    NORML Forms Multi-State Workplace Drug Testing Coalition


    by Kevin Mahmalji, NORML Outreach Coordinator February 14, 2017

    The fact that 190 million Americans now live in states where marijuana has been legalized to some degree is raising a number of questions and issues about how to integrate the American workforce and marijuana consumers rights in regards to drug testing. With medical marijuana is legal in 29 states and recreational marijuana for adult use in 8 states and Washington DC, millions of responsible and otherwise law-abiding adults remain at risk of being excluded from the workforce due to a positive drug test — even where the use does not affect an individual’s job performance or has taken place days or weeks prior to the test.

    NORML believes that this practice is discriminatory and defies common sense. As a result, a growing coalition of NORML Chapters in California, Oregon, Colorado and Washington have come together to advocate for necessary legislative and workplace reforms to protect responsible marijuana consumers.

    NORML’s Workplace Drug Testing Coalition’s efforts will focus on these four areas:

    1. Reform workplace drug testing policies
    2. Expand employment opportunities for marijuana consumers
    3. Clarify the difference between detection technology and performance testing
    4. Highlight off-duty state law legal protections for employees

    “Even though marijuana is legal and readily available in several states, consumers are being unfairly forced to choose between their job and consuming off the clock as a result of out-of-date employment practices,” said Kevin Mahmalji, National Outreach Coordinator for NORML. “That is why many NORML chapters active in legal states are now shifting their attention to protecting honest, hardworking marijuana consumers from these sort of antiquated, discriminatory workplace drug-testing practices, in particular the use of random suspicionless urine testing.”

    Employer testing of applicants or employees for trace metabolites (inert waste-products) of past use of a legal substance makes no sense in the 21st century.  This activity is particularly discriminatory in the case of marijuana where such metabolites may be detectable for weeks or even months after the consumer has ceased use.

    With the 2017 Legislative Session underway, this issue is finally getting the attention it deserves. Legislation has already been introduced in Oregon and Washington, and is gaining traction in those states.

    “Random suspicionless drug testing of applicants or employees for past marijuana use is not just unfair and discriminatory, it’s bad for business,” said attorney Judd Golden of Boulder, Colorado, a long-time NORML activist and Coalition spokesperson. The modern workforce includes countless qualified people like Brandon Coats of Colorado, a paraplegic medical marijuana patient who never was impaired on the job and had an unblemished work record. Brandon was fired from a Fortune 500 company after a random drug test, and lost his case in the Colorado Supreme Court in 2015. The Court unfortunately found Colorado’s lawful off-duty activities law that protects employees for legal activities on their own time didn’t apply to marijuana use.

    California NORML is also expecting legislation to be introduced this session to address this issue. Ellen Komp, deputy director of California NORML said, “One of the most frequently asked questions we have been getting since Prop. 64 passed legalizing adult marijuana use in California last November is, ‘Am I now protected against drug testing on my job?’ Sadly in our state, not even medical marijuana patients are protected against job discrimination, and it’s a priority of Cal NORML to change that. We are hoping to get a bill introduced at the state level and are working with legislators, unions, and other reform groups to make that happen.”

    NORML Chapters across the country are advocating on behalf of the rights of responsible marijuana consumers against discrimination in the workplace. “Our coalition was formed with the intention of not only educating legislators, but also with businesses in mind.  It is important they know testing for marijuana is not mandatory, and that employers have testing options,” said Jordan Person, executive director for Denver NORML. The Denver chapter is currently working with companies that offer performance impairment testing of workers suspected of on-the-job impairment or use rather than unreliable bodily fluid testing to help provide options for employers.

    thumbs_up

    For decades drug testing companies and others have pushed their agenda through a campaign of misinformation. Until now there has never been an organized effort to challenge the profit- driven ideology of those who seek to benefit from intrusive drug screening. Mounting evidence continues to prove there is no logical reason why adult marijuana consumers should be treated with any less respect, restricted more severely, and denied the same privileges we extend to responsible adults who enjoy a casual cocktail after a long day at the office.

    For legal questions, please contact Coalition spokesperson Judd Golden at juddgolden@outlook.com. For other marijuana related questions or an interview, please contact Kevin Mahmalji at kevinm@norml.org.

    CONTINUE READING…

    Trump Just Made The Biggest Sale Of Drilling Rights On Federal Land In 4 Years


    The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) made its largest lease sale in four years, marking the start of President Donald Trump’s plans to expand drilling on federal lands.

    BLM sold drilling rights on 278 parcels of public land for $129.3 million. Bids ranged from $2 per acre to $16,500 per acre. The land sold was mostly located in Wyoming — about half of which is directly controlled by the federal government.

    “In the first lease sale under the Trump administration, the BLM had its biggest sale in the past four years,” Utah Republican Rob Bishop, chairman of the House Committee on Natural Resources, told The Daily Caller News Foundation. “Today’s successful sale in part is a recognition that the BLM under new leadership will prioritize fulfilling its statutory mandate of multiple-use land management and the holding of quarterly lease sales, and the industry is responding accordingly.”

    Thursday’s lease sale is one of four BLM has planned for this year.

    “This is an encouraging indication that we are headed in a new and better direction for the Bureau and Americans who benefit from greater access to these taxpayer-owned resources,” Bishop said.

    Congress wants to rollback energy regulations for pubic lands. Lawmakers have already used the Congressional Review Act to repeal Obama-era regulations on coal mining and are looking to eliminate a regulation on flaring natural gas. Congress also wants to repeal a BLM rule, called “Planning 2.0,” which critics say seizes power from local officials and makes energy development more difficult.

    Rolling back federal restrictions on public lands would create 2.7 million jobs and add $663 billion to the economy each year for the next 30 years, according to a 2016 study by Louisiana State University and the free-market Institute for Energy Research.

    Opening these lands and waters could boost wages by $5.1 trillion, generating $3.9 trillion in new federal tax revenue over the next 37 years according to the research. Increased energy development could create 2.7 million new jobs.

    Follow Andrew on Twitter

    Send tips to andrew@dailycallernewsfoundation.org.

    CONTINUE READING…

    Thousands of Filipino Catholics march against death penalty, war on drugs


    http://s1.reutersmedia.net/resources/r/?d=20170218&i=126316728&w=780&r=126316728-1&t=2

    Thousands of Roman Catholics marched in the Philippines capital Manila on Saturday in the biggest gathering denouncing extra-judicial killings and a government plan to reimpose the death penalty for criminals.

    Dubbed a “Walk for Life” prayer rally and endorsed by the Catholic Bishops Conference of the Philippines (CBCP), the gathering came just days after the church launched its strongest attack against President Rodrigo Duterte’s war on drugs.

    Organizers claimed as many as 50,000 people took part in the march toward Manila’s Rizal Park, while about 10,000 based on police estimates stayed to hear speeches.

    More than 7,600 people have been killed since Duterte launched his anti-drugs campaign seven months ago. More than 2,500 died in shootouts during raids and sting operations, according to the police.

    Amid mounting criticism about a surge in killings, Duterte said on Saturday that the campaign was “by and large successful”.

    Speaking at the Philippine Military Academy’s alumni homecoming in Baguio City, he said the drug problem was more complex than he initially thought, prompting him to seek military support.

    “I need the help of each one, especially the military, not for social control but protection (for) the citizens from the lawless, the reckless, and the selfish,” the firebrand leader said.

    Both the government and police have denied that extra-judicial killings have taken place. But human rights groups believe many deaths that police had attributed to vigilantes were carried out by assassins likely colluding with police.

    “We cannot teach that killing is wrong by killing those who kill. It also increases the number of killers,” CBCP president Lingayen-Dagupan Archbishop Socrates Villegas said in a statement.

    Manila Archbishop Luis Antonio Cardinal Tagle, who also joined the rally, called for strengthening and promoting the culture of non-violent movements.

    In its most strongly worded attack on the crackdown on drug pushers and users, a CBCP pastoral letter read out at services across the country early this month said killing people was not the answer to trafficking of illegal drugs.

    Nearly 80 percent of the Philippines’ 100 million people are Catholic and until recently the church had been hesitant to criticize Duterte’s war on drugs.

    Senator Leila de Lima, a staunch critic of Duterte’s war on drugs now facing three drug-related charges, also joined the rally. She said the charges were meant to silence her.

    (Reporting by Enrico dela Cruz and Manuel Mogato; Editing by Michael Perry)

    CONTINUE READING….