Category Archives: Activists

A "repealer’s" opinion on the subject of marijuana "legalization"… (We must REPEAL PROHIBITION of Cannabis and all other plants!)


 
sheeple
 
Angalee Jones

34 mins ·

By Chris:

I can’t speak loudly enough or harshly enough against the Fucking Sell Out RATS at groups like NORML, MPP and DPA and their associated allies at various commercial enterprises growing up across the country.
All of the aforementioned groups are useless and no good for the American Cannabis Consumer.

They are GREAT for anybody wanting to try to go into business. They are GREAT for the Police, and the Taxman.

But they represent pure POISON for the ordinary cannabis consumer.

By focusing efforts on the creation of commercial opportunities instead of civil rights, the aforementioned groups show themselves to be utterly unconcerned with what is the best interest of Cannabis or what is best for it’s consumers.

They also show themselves to be more interested in creating financial empires than in making pot available to all.

I have been trying tirelessly for over 40 years to try to ELIMINATE cannabis regulation, with the end result being the ability of allowing the private person to grow smoke and sell their own weed which they grow themselves.

Unfortunately, the loudest and best financed voices in this effort don’t have this in mind.

They have in mind owning a series of state licensed and regulated outlets which will both limit production and distribution to a small group of wealthy investors who are seeking to monopolize the markets and prevent the average person from growing their own.

I have taken a look at how this is working out across the country.

In states where pot is supposed to be “Legalized”, it is still illegal to grow your own unless you have a special permission to do so from the police.
This is the exact opposite of what I wanted when I first started putting on Smoke In’s back in the early eighties.
But it fits in just FINE with what SCOTT Inc wants.

 
I cannot adequately describe my utter despair over what has happened.

I blame the people at NORML for this. For creating an atmosphere of privilege and entitlement instead of creating an environment of equality and access.
For trying to create private commercial empires instead of making medicine available to those who need it with a minimum of cost instead of being squeezed for exorbitant prices upwards of $30.00 a gram.
What is happening is more like extortion and price gouging instead of easy access and affordability.
The whole lot of asshole ripoff artists who bleat “Legalize” like a pack of sheep instead of trying to get rid of this evil unwanted law, and EVIL THOUGHTLESS CRIMINALS who are bent on creating a corporatized monopoly of limited access and higher prices need to be punished.
They have done personal freedom and universal access a grave injury.
They are DIRECTLY RESPONSIBLE for making the counterculture revolution that was starting to grow in my youth FAIL.

Shame on Keith Stroop. Shame on Ethan Nadelman. Shame on Rob Kampia.
A curse should be laid at your feet for being willing cohorts to promoting business profits over human liberty.

I have had enough.
I refuse to cooperate.
I will insist on growing my own weed myself, not pay taxes on it, and encouraging people to attack state licensed cannabis outlets wherever they exist.
Fuck Legalization. It’s just another pot law designed to raise prices and limit access.
ABOLISH ALL POT LAWS NOW… (or ELSE!)

(And when I say “Or Else”, I mean that I hope that you have plenty of broken window and paint balloon and shoplifting security and insurance available, as I and my supporters plan to try to make it almost IMPOSSIBLE for you to afford to stay in business in retribution against your anti-people and pro capital practices.)
Fuck Legalization. Fuck those who support Legalization instead of grow your own.
You are not a patriot or even a good hippie if that is what you want. Instead, I am calling you out for being a DEMON, an EVIL BAD PERSON, instead of a decent human being.
You have had your chance. You choose poorly.
Now you get to pay the penalty for those bad decisions.

Fuck NORML.
Fuck MPP.
Fuck DPA.
Fuck SAFER.
Fuck Rob Kampia.
Fuck Ethan Nadelman.
Fuck Keith Stroup.

These are the leaders who are to blame.
These are the guys who are more interested in continuing to handle pot cases as lawyers than they are in letting people grow their own pot.
They deserve the harshest criticism possible, they need to be pied in public, de-pantsed, and embarrassed every time they show themselves in public to speak.
They are doing a great service to the dollar, and a complete sell out against the end consumer.
They are also hurting pot itself by limiting research and development and production by designing systems with built in limitations designed to create personal wealth instead of creating systems designed around allowing universal public access.
They are a pack of dastardly evil worms who deserve to be crushed and burned.

Needless to say, I an no longer a pot activist, but rather a pot revolutionary.
Until the weed is TRULY FREE and ALL can PARTAKE AND GROW, I will not be stopped or silenced.

Fuck You if you disagree, because if you support Legalization instead of abolition, you are no better than some southern plantation owner talking about how good the slave system is because it is the source of your wealth.

Fuck Legalization.

Fuck YOU if you support Legalization.

Abolition is the way.

SOURCE

Kratom Advocates Sip Tea and Seethe at White House Rally Against DEA Ban


One user plans to move to Canada. Another plans to quit. Many more don’t know what to do.

By Steven Nelson | Staff Writer Sept. 13, 2016, at 6:20 p.m.

Several protest attendees brought their own bottle of kratom tea Tuesday to the White House. Those who did not were offered a Solo cup.

Several protest attendees brought their own bottle of kratom tea Tuesday to the White House. Those who did not were offered a Solo cup. Steven Nelson for USN&WR

Hundreds of passionate protesters gathered Tuesday near the White House to demand that the popular plant product kratom remain legal. It was jointly a business industry conference, a tea party and a desperate consumer lobbying effort — but the clear-eyed crowd appears to have little chance of near-term victory.

A comprehensive U.S. ban likely will take effect on Sept. 30, just a month after the Drug Enforcement Administration surprised users by saying it would invoke emergency powers to make leaves from the tree grown in Southeast Asia illegal by labeling two main constituents Schedule I substances.

In the face of long odds and silence from Capitol Hill, the event called by the American Kratom Association sought to pressure officials to reconsider while laying the groundwork for what may become a protracted re-legalization campaign.

A large jug of brewed kratom sat in the middle of Pennsylvania Avenue, with red Solo cups offered to anyone who wanted some. At least one reporter sipped the brew, which tasted like astringent green tea. Another journalist took a pill offered as a free sample by a businessman.

Kratom users who attended the rally said it’s wrong for them to lose legal access to what they say is an effective treatment for pain, addiction, depression and other conditions.

Though many said they were angry, chant-leaders asked the crowd of a couple hundred to stay on message and favored reason over rage, which often is a leading emotion at White House protests staged by marijuana reform advocates who say decades in Schedule I has stalled medical cannabis research amid millions of arrests.

“I’m usually very quiet but felt the need to come out and speak,” says Veronika Bamford-Conners, a kratom-selling store owner from Sullivan, Maine, where, she says, most of her customers are older than 55.

“If they don’t have insurance and can’t afford medications, they find a cheaper alternative in kratom,” she says, though some seem to prefer relief from the leaf to painkillers, such as a 73-year-old man who she says called her weeping “because pharmaceuticals were killing him” before.

Chants at the rally advertised the death toll from accidental overdoses of opioids – more than 28,000 in 2014 alone, including legal painkillers and illegal drugs like heroin – with the low or nonexistent U.S. toll from kratom.

The DEA says it believes 15 deaths were caused by kratom, though American Kratom Association founder Susan Ash says the group hired a toxicologist who concluded each case could be attributed to other drugs.

Many kratom users say the plant has helped them abstain from substances they formerly were addicted to, often heroin or prescription painkillers.

“Kratom saved me, I was a bad heroin addict,” says David Allen, who traveled from Chapel Hill, North Carolina. “It keeps cravings away and helped me not drink. I came because I don’t want to lose my medicine.”

Allen says that although the DEA – and even some former kratom users – say the drug can lead to dependence, it’s nothing like the grasp of opioids. He says he believe it’s about as abusable as coffee, which comes from a related plant, and that like coffee withdrawal, ending kratom can cause minor headaches.

Brad Miller, a physics teacher at Spotsylvania High School in Virginia, says he drinks small amounts of kratom tea between three and five times a day to treat arthritis in his knees. He says the effects are “very mild” and “just enough to take the edge off so I can get through my day standing.”

Miller says prescribed painkillers from his rheumatologist were too strong and that unlike opioids he hasn’t developed an addiction to kratom. He says he went on a weeklong camping trip and – unlike the experiences of some users – felt no withdrawal symptoms.

“I didn’t have withdrawal symptoms, but I did have arthritis pain,” he says. “I’d be surprised if anyone has experienced strong withdrawal symptoms.”

Though Miller and others at the event said they aren’t sure what they will do at the end of the month, Heather Hawkins says she’s made up her mind to move to Canada, where kratom remains legal.

Hawkins, a journalist with northern Florida’s Pensacola News-Journal and owner of the Kratom Literacy Project, says she has an incurable bladder disease and is eyeing Vancouver after already moved to the Sunshine State from Alabama in reaction to a local kratom ban.

Talk about moving abroad often is spouted unseriously by political partisans around election time, but Hawkins says she’s completely serious after living in a painkiller-induced haze that left her depressed and unable to get out of bed.

“I’m not going to stay here [if the ban takes effect] because I’m not going back to that life,” she says.

Hawkins says she’s in addiction recovery from cocaine, which she says she used as self-medication to give her the energy to power through her pain and despair, and that if she regarded kratom as a drug she would not take it.

Though kratom is widely known for claims that it can help keep opioid addicts clean, it’s also credited with sapping desire for other substances.

Jeremy Haley, owner of Colorado’s Rocky Mountain Kratom, says he began using kratom in 2012 after a drunk driving arrest, and that it has helped veer him away from his alcoholism, which runs in the family.

Although the ban hasn’t yet taken effect, Haley says local officials have shut down his shop for what he views as dubious reasons, making him unable to sell the remaining inventory – the latest in what he says has been a constant regulatory headache that featured him asking Yelp reviewers to delete positive reviews to placate federal officials who wanted proof he was not marketing kratom for human consumption.

Haley plans to open a totally legal apothecary shop if the ban takes effect.

CONTINUE READING…



RELATED CONTENT
Pot Breathalyzer Hits the Street

A futuristic drug-detecting fingerprint scanner may soon follow.

Debate on Foreign Policy, War and Peace, scheduled for September 30th in Lexington and will include Democrat, Republican, Green Party and Libertarian Party Leaders in Kentucky


Debate in LEXINGTON KENTUCKY: Foreign Policy, War and Peace

 

Kentucky Green Party  Image result for Libertarian party kentucky  Image result for democrat party kentucky  Image result for republican party kentucky

 

See Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/1804070499806582/

The panel debate will be on Friday, September 30 from 7:00 to 9:00 pm in Lexington on the campus of the Bluegrass Community & Technical College (BCTC) on Cooper Drive – Oswald Bldg. Auditorium, Room 230.

Four of the 6 participants have already confirmed, so the show will definitely go on and they include the following:

Ken Moellman, Libertarian Party

Bernadene Zennie, Green Party

Jason Belcher, a Democrat who will represent the positions of Hillary Clinton and the DNC,

T.J. Litafik, a Republican who will represent the positions of Donald Trump,

Others who have been invited are Senator Rand Paul (R) and someone designated by the Jim Gray (D) campaign as well. If Sen. Paul cannot make it, he is invited to send a surrogate.

There will be a neutral moderator and a timekeeper. All media are invited to cover the action. Initial questions will have time limits of 3 to 4 minutes per person, and will deal with topics such as the following:

“The US has approximately 700 to 900 military bases all over the world. No other country does. Is that the way things should be, and why or why not?”

 
Was the invasion of Iraq in 2003 by former President George W. Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney a good idea, or was it a case of illegal aggression?

 
Many Democratic and Republican members of Congress and candidates are expressing hostility to Russia. Is that wise?

What should the US be doing with regard to the conflict in Syria, which has been going on for the last 5 years?

Was President Obama’s bombing of Libya in 2011, which was supported by then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, a case of international aggression?

Should our defense budget be decreased, increased or kept about the same?”

There will also be cards for members of the audience to write questions on, if time allows. Panelists will be encouraged to rebut things other panelists say.

 

Moderator: Dr. Michael Benton, BCTC
Sponsors: BCTC Students for Peace & Earth Justice
Central Kentucky Council for Peace & Justice

Yours in Peace,
Geoff Young
Member, Peace Action Task Group
Central Kentucky Council for Peace & Justice
(859) 278-4966

Marijuana Missionaries: First Cannabis Church Rolls Into Michigan


There’s no religious dogma in this church, but these marijuana missionaries are intent in on bringing ostracized stoners back into the fold.

By Beth Dalbey (Patch Staff) – September 19, 2016 10:05 pm ET

Marijuana Missionaries: First Cannabis Church Rolls Into Michigan

Congregants in this church aren’t high on Jesus. In fact, the very name of the church sounds like lyrics from a rock and (ahem) roll song or the backdrop for a classic Cheech and Chong movie.

It’s true that First Cannabis Church of Logic and Reason’s sacrament might be a doobie or marijuana-infused brownie instead of the body and blood of Christ, and its dogma is steeped in giving thanks to the cannabis plant for its healing nature and the sense of well-being it gives users instead of Jesus’ sacrifices for sinners.

The church, made up of a congregation of mostly atheists and agnostics, made its debut in Lansing, Michigan, earlier this summer.

So, how can it be a church if its members eschew a higher power — beyond, that is, the feeling of euphoria they get from smoking pot or the satisfaction of using a sustainable crop for fuel and fiber?

“Well, the reality is it sounded better than a cannabis cult,” organizer Jeremy Hall told the Lansing State Journal after the congregation’s inaugural service last June that included time for fellowship and a potluck with “both medicated and non-medicated food.”

First Cannabis Church in Indiana

The First Church of Cannabis traces its roots to Indiana as a political statement in response to the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, backed by Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, now Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump’s running mate.

Self-anointed Grand Poobah Bill Levin has made all sorts of glib proclamations, including the Deity Dozen, which is sort of like the Ten Commandments— for example, “Do not be a ‘troll’ on the internet, respect others without name calling and being vulgarly aggressive,” and “Treat your body as a temple. Do not poison it with poor quality foods and sodas.” Also, don’t be a jerk, or words to that effect.

There are also marijuana-based churches in Florida, Alabama, Oregon and Arizona. Many of them embrace organized religion to one extent or another, but Hall is more resolute in his iteration.

At the First Cannabis Church of Logic and Reason in Michigan, it’s all cannabis, all the time — whether in its leafy tobacco form, as fiber for clothing, as a biofuel or for shelter, paper and plastics.

It’s a miracle,” Hall told The Detroit News. “It can save humanity. Cannabis is something to be put on a pedestal, to be revered.”

What’s God Got To Do With It?

An ordained minister with the online Universal Life Church and a marijuana caregiver who originally hails from Ypsilanti, Hall moved back to Michigan from Tennessee in part because legal medical marijuana is available for treatment of his wife’s lupus.

He hopes congregants at the Lansing church can change attitudes about pot smokers with service projects around the city, like a recent cleanup at a Lansing park.

From his early youth indoctrinated in the Young Earth Creationist congregation — a fundamentalist church that rejected evolution and forbade the use of radios because it supposedly played the devil’s music — to his new role as the founder of the First Cannabis Church of Logic and Reason, Hall has experienced both ends of the religious spectrum.

Though he rejected many of the tenets of his early teachings and other religions, he told The Detroit News he liked the fellowship aspect of church in general and the way a house of worship can gather in people who live on the margins. So he formed a church, taking God out of the equation.

Still, Hall’s church embodies the WWJD — “What would Jesus do?” — spirit more than you might think, even though it is not rooted in Christianity.

On a flyer seeking participants in a recent park cleanup, Hall acknowledged that pot smokers “have been demonized in the eyes of the public as miscreants and law breakers, ignorant and unmotivated.”

So, just as Jesus reached out to the disenfranchised, the church is a chance for Hall and his wife to reach out to people who have been “using cannabis and feeling ostracized” by their regular places of worship, Michigan Radio reported.

“We’re using our church to elevate the community and to show we aren’t a drain on society or a bunch of unmotivated criminals,” Hall told the Lansing State Journal.

Pot City, Michigan?

Not surprisingly, the church, located in the shadow of four medical marijuana dispensaries, has some detractors.

The Rejuvenating South Lansing citizens’ group, which wants more restrictions on dispensaries, worries the church further mainstreams marijuana use and will draw more users to the city.

“This is just another way they can do whatever they want,” Elaine Womboldt, the group’s founder, told The Detroit News. “We don’t want to be known as the pot city of Michigan.”

Also, at the first service earlier this summer, a lonely protester, Quaker traditionalist Rhonda Fuller, of Lansing, held a sign that warned the only people who benefit from marijuana are profiting financially from it: “It’s about money, not you. It’s misery for everyone else.”

Fuller told The Detroit News it’s unconscionable to call the First Church of Cannabis a church.

“Anyone can call anything a church,” she said. “It has nothing to do with Christianity — but neither does most churches.”

CONTINUE READING…

Mike Lewis and the Growing Warriors


By Andrew Baker  – Sep 20, 2016

 

mike-lewis-and-the-growing-warriors

One of the things I love most about our industry is that it’s constantly being shaken up. Everywhere you look, there’s an individual or a company taking things to a previously unprecedented level. What’s even more amazing is the pace at which things are moving; a pace that’s only going to increase in speed as the industry becomes more open and recognized.

To help illustrate what I mean, think about this: If you have kids that are, say 5 years old or younger, there is a good chance that you won’t need to teach them how to drive. At least not the way you or I learned. It’s entirely possible that our kids will never have to grab a steering wheel or press a gas pedal.

Don’t worry, I’ll wait while you go ahead and put your brain back together.

But you see, these types of technological advancements aren’t being made in exclusivity. Strides like what I described above aren’t possible simply because the automobile industry is so advanced. The technology that would go into a self-driving car could be repurposed, tweaked just a little bit, and put to use in something like virtual reality. It can, and often does, work the other way around as well.

The cannabis industry is no exception, as we’re starting to see. I really enjoy tech — and I’m obsessed with entrepreneurship — so the flood of cannabis startups is an exciting thing to watch. Typing all this out makes me realize two things. One, I haven’t tackled this sort of topic in any of my previous posts. Two, I’m eager to do so for you guys.

But that’ll have to wait.

What? You thought all of that was to lead up to me covering some sort of futuristic weed tech? Nope. I just needed a good segue to what I’ll be talking about in today’s post. Who, actually, not what.

His name is Mike Lewis and he’s shaking things up in a simple but powerful way and he’s doing it with just his hands and his voice.

Mike Lewis! Who? Mike Lewis!

Aside from any readers I have out of Houston, who got the song reference?

In all seriousness though, Mike Lewis is a name you’ll come to know quite well if you don’t already. We’ll start with the basics. Mike is a proud husband, father, veteran of the United States Army and Kentucky farmer. In 2012, he established Growing Warriors, the first veteran-oriented food security organization. 

There are about one million veterans and active duty military personnel receiving benefits from the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program (SNAP), more commonly referred to as food stamps. It’s also no secret that the unemployment rate among veterans is unacceptably high. (To be fair, it is declining at a considerable rate.)  Mike’s answer to this issue? Teach them how to grow and preserve their own food while banding together within their communities. This was accomplished by forming partnerships with cities, veteran hospitals, educational institutions, and community based organizations in order to provide veterans with hands on, curriculum-based learning opportunities. Since it’s inception, Growing Warriors has been able to help dozens of veteran families produce tens of thousands of pounds in organic produce.

Keep in mind that I’m just giving you a brief introduction. Mike’s, and the Growing Warriors’, efforts extend across multiple states and I could easily fill out the rest of this post by diving deep into everything they’re doing. For today, though, I want to bring your attention to what Mike and the Growing Warriors are doing for our industry, specifically the industrial hemp side of things.

Harvesting Liberty With Growing Warriors

If you haven’t seen it yet, check out this short documentary film, Harvesting Liberty. Backed and presented by Patagonia, this film aims to address and shed light on the legalization of industrial hemp in the United States. Seriously, stop reading this, open that link in another tab, take the next 12 minutes of your day to watch it, then come back here to finish up and talk to me about what you think.

A couple of years ago, President Obama signed the Agriculture Act of 2014 — the Farm Bill — into effect. There’s a section of this act titled Legitimacy of Industrial Hemp Research. Basically, this section allows for universities and state departments of agriculture — in states where hemp is legal to grow — to grow hemp for research or pilot programs. Back in the 1800’s, Kentucky dominated the industrial hemp market. So, it’s quite fitting that a group of Kentucky farmers, Mike and the Growing Warriors, were given permission to cultivate 5 acres. 

As soon as they got their seeds, Mike “threw ‘em the ground really quickly before anybody changed their mind.”

American Hemp Flag

I found two things to be really interesting while watching that documentary and doing further research afterward.

First, the way Mike and his team go about processing the harvested hemp into useable materials. Get this: it’s done entirely by hand. When you think about it, that actually makes sense. Industrial hemp hasn’t been cultivated in America since it was listed as a Schedule I controlled substance, so of course there’s no hemp processing machinery just laying around waiting to be used. Even if there was, Mike wanted to use traditional methods to weave what he had in store. More on that in a moment, though.

They begin by using a process known as retting. Put simply, retting is the natural process of allowing moisture and microorganisms to remove the sugars in the stalk that hold all the fibers together. Once the plant has been retted completely, it’s moved to the barn for drying. What follows is called breaking, or decorticating. The hemp stalk is run through a hand powered machine that crushes the stalk and separates each of the fibers. Once separated, the fibers are spun together using spinners that are, once again, hand powered.

The second thing that really caught my interest (and by that I mean it had me grinning from ear to ear) is what they decided to make with the materials that came from this first harvest.

An American Flag. (Not sorry if I’m spoiling anything because I told you to stop and watch the documentary!)

“We made this American ingenuity with people from all walks of life. Life and society are not uniform or standardized in any way. This flag represents the bumps and ridges in our society and the great things that happen when we accept differences and work to solve problems. It represents all of us and our future.”

Nationwide Legalization of Industrial Hemp

On the 4th of July, Mike delivered that flag to Congress along with a speech in support of the Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2015/2016. This act proposes the nationwide legalization of industrial hemp cultivation, something I’ll be digging into in a later article.

Mike takes a stance that you don’t see often in this industry and its activists. While he’s obviously in full support of legalization and bringing industrial hemp farming back to America, he also recognizes the need to take it slow. There’s a lot of mistakes left to be made and we need to let those kinks get worked out before attempting to blow up the market. Not only that, but there’s a ton of misinformation out there when it comes to hemp. Most of the public still doesn’t understand that hemp isn’t the same as its THC-laden counterpart cannabis.  

There’s a lot that can be said about Mike Lewis and all the work he’s putting out into the world. If I had to pick one thing, it would be that he’s solid proof that you don’t have to be a high tech startup out of San Francisco, Seattle, Portland, or Denver to effect real change on the cannabis industry. Those types of businesses have their place and I’m rooting for them. I just think it’s important that you don’t forget that there’s a place for you outside of an office space, if that’s where you’d rather be.

Interested in growing hemp or getting involved? You can learn more over at the National Hemp Association and the Hemp Industries Association.

CONTINUE READING…

The DEA could resume sending medical marijuana patients and caregivers to prison at the end of this month — unless you act right now.


The DEA could resume sending medical marijuana patients and caregivers to prison at the end of this month — unless you act right now.

You probably already know that for the past two years our movement has succeeded in passing Congressional amendments preventing the Justice Department from interfering with state medical cannabis laws.

But those provisions are set to expire on September 30 — just 24 days from now.

Please take one minute and send a message to your representative and senators urging them to extend federal protections for medical marijuana patients and providers.

Last month, a federal court sided with us — and against the DEA — in deciding that the amendment does what it says: The Department of Justice can’t spend any money to prosecute people for activity that’s in compliance with state medical cannabis laws.

But the court issued our movement and the patients who benefit from our work a dire warning:

“DOJ is currently prohibited from spending funds…for prosecutions of those who complied with state law. But Congress could appropriate funds for such prosecutions tomorrow.

The annual funding bill that contains the medical marijuana provision is set to expire at the end of this month, and we need to make sure Congress includes language protecting people who rely on medical marijuana in next year’s bill, too.

It just takes one minute to type in your contact info and send the prewritten letter we’ve drafted for you.

Medical marijuana patients are counting on you. Will you step up and ask your legislators to do the right thing?

Take Action

Thanks for all that you do.

Sincerely,

Tom Angell
Founder and Chairman
Marijuana Majority

Connect With Us:

Facebook

Twitter

A day after the federal judge declared that he will wait up to two weeks to issue his ruling to temporarily halt construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, the Red Warrior Camp continues to grow and thrive.


August 25, 2016

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact: Cody Hall

Organization: Red Warrior Camp

Voice Phone Number: (605) 220-2531

Email Address: RedWarriorCamp@gmail.com

Social Media: Facebook.com/RedWarriorCamp , @ZuyaLutaOceti on Twitter

Cannon Ball River, 1851 Ft Laramie Treaty Territory…

A day after the federal judge declared that he will wait up to two weeks to issue his ruling to temporarily halt construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, the Red Warrior Camp continues to grow and thrive.
The camp has established a recycling program; a food distribution program to support camp kitchens; nonviolent direct action training and culture based activities.

North Dakota Homeland Security Division’s decision to abruptly remove their trailers and drinking water tanks have not affected the people in camp.

Much like our ancestors before us, we are resilient and will persevere. These delays will not deter, but in fact will motivate, the people to focus on what they came here for…to protect the water.

More than 50 native nations and allies from around the world have converged here on the banks of the Cannon Ball River to be a voice for the sacred water and Mother Earth. The population is expected to increase in the coming week with the influx of additional tribal nations arriving.
——————————–
To support the Water Protectors at the camp please visit Owe Aku’s web page at www.oweakuinternational.org and click Owe Aku. There you can find more information on our history as cultural and environmental protectors. The camp needs us all more than ever now. Wopila.

Proposed Medicaid Changes in Kentucky – Tell us what you think about Governor Bevin’s proposed Medicaid changes


Proposed Medicaid Changes in Kentucky – Tell us what you think about Governor Bevin’s proposed Medicaid changes – LINK

PLEASE FOLLOW LINK ABOVE TO COMPLETE THIS IMPORTANT SURVEY!  YOUR HEALTHCARE IS AT RISK IN KENTUCKY!  NOW IS THE TIME TO SPEAK UP!

United 874K Members and Supporters –
The three public hearings on the proposed Medicaid waiver have been completed, with approximately 400 individuals in attendance in Bowling Green, Frankfort and Hazard, KY and nearly 100 individuals who spoke. 98% of those who spoke expressed concerns about the proposed waiver. Concerns were expressed about requiring the “medically frail” to pay monthly premiums; about a work or volunteer requirement of 20 hours/week for those on the Medicaid Expansion; loss of retroactive eligibility which could cause a lapse in coverage or a delay in beginning Medicaid coverage; increasing premiums over several years for some Medicaid members, with a 6-month lock-out from services if the premium is not paid; eliminating annual dental and vision check-ups and routine care for the Medicaid Expansion folks
Clearly those Medicaid members who are deemed to be “medically frail” (by a process yet to be determined, but ostensibly those with SMI. Chronic SUD, complicated medical conditions, are on SSI, or have a disability that interferes with a task of daily living) will be charged a monthly premium, probably in the range of $1 – $8 / month. We are concerned both by the financial burden, but also by the administrative burden created by this requirement. If the premium is not paid, then the medically frail individual will have to pay a copay for every service and every medication! While the 1915 C Waivers are exempt from this current 1115 Waiver Proposal from the Administration, we are concerned about individuals who are currently covered by Medicaid while waiting for a 1915 waiver slot. They would likely be classified as “medically frail” and would be subject to a monthly premium; if not paid, then they would be charged a copay for each health service and each medication they receive.
Medically frail individuals will not have a work or volunteer requirement and will have the full range of current benefits, including dental and vision. These latter benefits (annual check-up, routine cleanings, etc.) are being removed from the benefit package for all other Medicaid members (excluding children and pregnant women); those basic health benefits will have to be “earned” by the member through their Rewards Account.
I urge you to spread the word and to encourage those affected by these waiver changes, their families, providers and advocates to submit comments! I am available to answer questions or to be of assistance, if you will contact me.
I have attached a flyer which gives information about writing or emailing your comments about the waiver to Medicaid Commissioner Miller. THE DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF WRITTEN COMMENTS IS 5:00 P.M. ON FRIDAY, JULY 22, 2016! Volume is important, so please encourage everyone to write in. And send a copy of your comment to kymedicaidchanges@gmail.com so we can be sure that your voice is heard!
I have also attached a brief description of the waiver proposal and how it would affect various groups of people who are now Medicaid members.
KY Voices for Health is conducting a very short SURVEY about the proposed changes in Medicaid. Please distribute this link and ask folks to complete the survey! It takes less than 3-4 minutes.

This is me at 21 years old. This is the day I graduated from the Detroit police academy…


Merri McGregor

Yesterday near Harrison Township, MI ·

This is me at 21 years old. This is the day I graduated from the Detroit police academy at 4:00pm, went home and took a couple hour nap, woke up at 9:30 that night and reported to my first tour of duty at the 12th Precinct for midnight shift. Look at that smile on my face. I couldn’t have been more excited, more proud. Armed with my dad’s badge that he wore for 25 years on my chest, one of my mom’s sergeant stripe patches in my pocket, my lucky $2.00 bill tucked into my bulletproof vest, a gun I was barely old enough to purchase bullets for on my hip and enough naive courage for a small army, I headed out the door…my mom snapped this photo on my way.

The next 17 years would bring plenty of shed blood, black eyes, torn ligaments, stab wounds, stitches, funerals, a head injury, permanent and irreparable nerve damage, 5 ruptured discs, some charming PTSD and depression issues and a whole lot of heartache. They brought missed Christmases with my family, my absence from friends’ birthday get-togethers, pricey concert tickets that were forfeited at the last minute because of a late call and many sleepless nights.

I’ve laid in wet grass on the freeway for three hours watching a team of burglars and orchestrating their apprehension, I’ve dodged gunfire while running down a dark alley in the middle of the night chasing a shooting suspect, I’ve argued with women who were too scared to leave their abusive husbands until they realized they had to or they would end up dead. I’ve peeled a dead, burned baby from the front of my uniform shirt, I’ve felt the pride of putting handcuffs on a serial rapist and I’ve cried on the chest of and kissed the cheek of my dead friend, coworker and academy classmate even though it was covered in his own dried blood and didn’t even look like him from all the bullet holes. I know what a bullet sounds like when it’s whizzing past your ear, a few inches away, I know what the sound of a Mother’s shrilling scream is like when she finds out her son has been killed in the middle of the street and I know what it’s like to have to tell a wife and mother of 3 that her husband was killed in a car accident while on his way home from work.
Smells, pictures, sounds and sights are burned and engrained into our minds…things we can never forget, no matter how hard we try; things that haunt our sleep at night and our thoughts during the day; things that we volunteered to deal with so that you don’t have to. Things I don’t want my sister, little cousins or YOU to even have to KNOW about.

I never once went to work thinking, “I’m gonna beat someone tonight.”; “Hmmm…I think I’m gonna kill someone tonight.” I DID, however, go to work every night, knowing that I was going to do the best I could to keep good people safe, even if that meant that I died doing so.

We ALL need to start being more understanding and compassionate toward one another. Violence doesn’t cure violence and hate doesn’t cure hate. I’ve seen and experienced both sides of the spectrum since I left the PD and I get it. I truly do. But this all has to stop.

Are cops perfect? No. Are there bad cops? Yes. But please…understand that the vast majority of police are good, loving, well intentioned family people. They have husbands and wives and children and parents and pets and cousins and mortgages and electric bills and lawns that need cutting, just like you. They have hearts and consciences. They aren’t robots, they’re not machines and they just want to help keep the wolves away from the sheep. I KNOW there’s people who don’t deserve to wear the badge but they’re SO VERY few and far between. It breaks my heart to see all this hatred and anger flying around. All it’s doing is encouraging more of the same.

If you’ve read this far, thank you for listening. I’m not gonna sit here and tell you that if you hate or don’t support one side or the other, to unfriend me and never speak to me again…I hope those are the people who come straight TO me. Because I’ll be more than happy to hug you and pray or meditate with you. I’ll be more than happy to listen to your concerns and let you vent and empathize with your feelings. But then I’ll encourage you to help me find a solution to end all this nonsense because if we’re not part of the solution, we’re part of the problem. Love to all of you. ALL OF YOU. We’re all SO much better than this.

❤️❤️❤️❤️❤️✌️❤️❤️❤️❤️✌️

 

ORIGINAL SOURCE LINK:

MotherJones.Com "My four months as a private prison guard", by Shane Bauer


Have you ever had a riot?” I ask a recruiter from a prison run by the Corrections Corporation of America (CCA).
“The last riot we had was two years ago,” he says over the phone.
“Yeah, but that was with the Puerto Ricans!” says a woman’s voice, cutting in. “We got rid of them.”
“When can you start?” the man asks.
I tell him I need to think it over.

I take a breath. Am I really going to become a prison guard? Now that it might actually happen, it feels scary and a bit extreme.

Read Why Our Reporter Worked at a Prison

From the editor: Why we sent a reporter to work as a private prison guard

I started applying for jobs in private prisons because I wanted to see the inner workings of an industry that holds 131,000 of the nation’s 1.6 million prisoners. As a journalist, it’s nearly impossible to get an unconstrained look inside our penal system. When prisons do let reporters in, it’s usually for carefully managed tours and monitored interviews with inmates. Private prisons are especially secretive. Their records often aren’t subject to public access laws; CCA has fought to defeat legislation that would make private prisons subject to the same disclosure rules as their public counterparts. And even if I could get uncensored information from private prison inmates, how would I verify their claims? I keep coming back to this question: Is there any other way to see what really happens inside a private prison?

 

CONTINUE READING….