Category Archives: CBD/Cannabidiol

Medical Marijuana, Inc.’s CBD Oil RSHO-X™ Garners National News Headlines Across Mexico For Significantly Reducing Seizures Of Epileptic Children


Articles Focus On RSHO-X™ Study Conducted on Severe Epileptic Children By Mexican Neurologist Who Reported Elimination in Seizures in 17% of Cases and Reduction of Motor Seizures in 84% of Cases

News provided by

Medical Marijuana, Inc.

Mar 17, 2017, 09:00 ET

 


SAN DIEGO, March 17, 2017 /PRNewswire/Medical Marijuana, Inc. (OTC: MJNA), the first-ever publicly traded cannabis company in the United States, announced today that its subsidiary HempMeds® Mexico garnered national news headlines across Mexico for the positive results of a recent study conducted by renowned Mexican physician Dr. Saul Garza Morales on the effects of its RSHO-X™ product in treating children with severe epilepsy. HempMeds® Mexico was the first company to receive government import permits for its cannabidiol (CBD) oil product Real Scientific Hemp Oil-X™ (RSHO-X™) via the Mexican Health Department COFEPRIS.

An article from Mexico newspaper Reforma, “Ayuda cannabidiol a 84% de pacientes,” or “Cannabidiol helps 84% of patients,” explained how 84 percent of children with epilepsy treated with RSHO-X™ halved the number of seizures they suffer from, according to this first clinical study on the use of cannabis in patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome in Mexico.   

“We are proud that our cannabidiol (CBD) hemp oil product, without THC, has enabled 17% of patients in the study to experience 100 percent relief from their seizures, the best results of any product/medication in the world regarding the reduction of seizures in Lennox-Gastaut patients,” said Medical Marijuana, Inc. CEO Dr. Stuart Titus. “It is exciting to see such widespread news coverage of these study results by the Mexico media, as studies that prove the therapeutic benefits of CBD like Dr. Garza’s study will continue to help fuel less restrictive medical cannabis programs not only in Mexico, but across the globe. In addition, as news spreads of this revolutionary treatment for diseases such as epilepsy, more patients and families that suffer from debilitating medical conditions will receive help with medical marijuana.”

The study included 39 patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, a severe form of pediatric epilepsy that typically develops before the age of 4. Of those 39 patients, who took up to 5-7mg CBD/kg progressive doses of RSHO-X™ 5000MG, 84% experienced a 50% or greater reduction in motor seizures; 53% reported better than a 75% reduction in seizures; and seven reported a complete elimination of all seizures (17%) over a four-month period, with zero reported side effects.

Results of this study are set to be published in the near future. To view the study, click here.

Other major national Mexico outlets that have reported the results of Dr. Garza’s epilepsy study with RSHO-X™ include:  

CONTINUE READING…

Clarification of the New Drug Code (7350) for Marijuana Extract


Note regarding this rule – In light of questions that the Drug Enforcement Administration has received from members of the public following the publication of the Final Rule establishing a new Controlled Substance Code Number (drug code) for marijuana extract, DEA makes the following clarification:

  • The new drug code (7350) established in the Final Rule does not include materials or products that are excluded from the definition of marijuana set forth in the Controlled Substances Act (CSA).1
  • The new drug code includes only those extracts that fall within the CSA definition of marijuana.
  • If a product consisted solely of parts of the cannabis plant excluded from the CSA definition of marijuana, such product would not be included in the new drug code (7350) or in the drug code for marijuana (7360).

As explained in the Final Rule, the creation of this new drug code was primarily intended to give DEA more precise accounting to assist the agency in carrying out its obligations to provide certain reports required by U.S. treaty obligations. Because the Final Rule did not add any substance to the schedules that was not already controlled, and did not change the schedule of any substance, it was not a scheduling action under 21 U.S.C. §§ 811 and 812.

The new drug code is a subset of what has always been included in the CSA definition of marijuana. By creating a new drug code for marijuana extract, the Final Rule divides into more descriptive pieces the materials, compounds, mixtures, and preparations that fall within the CSA definition of marijuana. Both drug code 7360 (marijuana) and new drug code 7350 (marijuana extract) are limited to that which falls within the CSA definition of marijuana.

Because recent public inquiries that DEA has received following the publication of the Final Rule suggest there may be some misunderstanding about the source of cannabinoids in the cannabis plant, we also note the following botanical considerations. As the scientific literature indicates, cannabinoids, such as tetrahydrocannabinols (THC), cannabinols (CBN) and cannabidiols (CBD), are found in the parts of the cannabis plant that fall within the CSA definition of marijuana, such as the flowering tops, resin, and leaves.2 According to the scientific literature, cannabinoids are not found in the parts of the cannabis plant that are excluded from the CSA definition of marijuana, except for trace amounts (typically, only parts per million)3 that may be found where small quantities of resin adhere to the surface of seeds and mature stalk.4  Thus, based on the scientific literature, it is not practical to produce extracts that contain more than trace amounts of cannabinoids using only the parts of the cannabis plant that are excluded from the CSA definition of marijuana, such as oil from the seeds. The industrial processes used to clean cannabis seeds and produce seed oil would likely further diminish any trace amounts of cannabinoids that end up in the finished product. However, as indicated above, if a product, such as oil from cannabis seeds, consisted solely of parts of the cannabis plant excluded from the CSA definition of marijuana, such product would not be included in the new drug code (7350) or in the drug code for marijuana (7360), even if it contained trace amounts of cannabinoids.5

1 The CSA states: “The term ‘marihuana’ means all parts of the plant Cannabis sativa L., whether growing or not; the seeds thereof; the resin extracted from any part of such plant; and every compound, manufacture, salt, derivative, mixture, or preparation of such plant, its seeds or resin. Such term does not include the mature stalks of such plant, fiber produced from such stalks, oil or cake made from the seeds of such plant, any other compound, manufacture, salt, derivative, mixture, or preparation of such mature stalks (except the resin extracted therefrom), fiber, oil, or cake, or the sterilized seed of such plant which is incapable of germination.” 21 U.S.C. § 802(16).

2 H. Mölleken and H. Hussman. Cannabinoid in seed extracts of Cannabis sativa cultivars. J. Int. Hemp Assoc. 4(2): 73-79 (1997).

3 See id.; see also S. Ross et al., GC-MS Analysis of the Total Δ9-THC Content of Both Drug- and Fiber-Type Cannabis Seeds, J. Anal. Toxic., Vol. 24, 715-717 (2000).

4 H. Mölleken, supra.

5 Nor would such a product be included under drug code 7370 (tetrahydrocannabinols). See Hemp Industries Association v. DEA, 357 F.3d 1012 (9th Cir. 2004) (Hemp II). However, as the Ninth Circuit stated in Hemp II, “when Congress excluded from the definition of marijuana ‘mature stalks of such plant, fiber . . . , [and] oil or cake made from the seeds,’ it also made an exception to the exception, and included ‘resin extracted from’ the excepted parts of the plant in the definition of marijuana, despite the stalks and seed exception.”  Id. at 1018. Thus, if an extract of cannabinoids were produced using extracted resin from any part of the cannabis plant (including the parts excluded from the CSA definition of marijuana), such an extract would be included in the CSA definition of marijuana.

SOURCE LINK

The DEA doesn’t see it as legal’ and that’s where he gets his medical license.”


FOX Files: Some doctors fear following Missouri’s medical marijuana law

Posted 11:15 pm, February 21, 2017, by Chris Hayes

ST. LOUIS, MO (KTVI)- A form of medical marijuana may be legal in Missouri, but patients are finding doctors afraid to even discuss it. It’s called CBD hemp oil, extracted from a type of marijuana that cannot get you high. It’s now legal in Missouri for treating intractable epilepsy, but families say some doctors are afraid to honor the new law.

Robert Tufts,  11, says it hurts when he seizes.

“It just feels like some sort of shock like, my brain, inside my head. I’ll just get a little fuzzy feeling and I’ll shake and I’ll be dizzy for a second.”

He takes a handful of pills he says sometimes make him feel worse.

“It just felt like I was so enraged and wanted to break everything.”

His mom, Stephanie, thinks CBD oil could be a better way, but she can’t convince her son’s doctor.

“His exact words to me were, ‘It’s not legal,’” said Stephanie Tufts.  “I said well the oil is legal here in Missouri and he basically came back with, ‘It’s not. The DEA doesn’t see it as legal’ and that’s where he gets his medical license.”

FOX 2 has learned only 66 families in Missouri have obtained medical cards to buy CBD oil, with potentially thousands of families asking for it.

Treasurer Eric Schmitt fought for the new law when he was State Senator.

“This idea that you’ve tried everything and it’s not working, but there may be something that is now legal in the State of Missouri to now possess and use and that a doctor and a hospital would not allow families to access that – there’s no excuse for it,” said Schmitt.

Schmitt has met with hospital administrators across the State trying to get them to reconsider.

“I know for a fact that there are neurologists in those hospital systems that want to be able to recommend, but are not being allowed to by the lawyers. And I think that that’s just…it’s unconscionable.”

There is one hospital working with patients.  It’s in St. Louis, SSM Health Cardinal Glennon Children’s Hospital.

Dr. Sean Goretzke with SSM said, “Even though there might be some negatives and some side effects, (we felt) there was a certain percentage of patients that we owed it to to do everything we could to try to help within a safe and reasonable effort.”

Dr. Goretzke is director of child neurology at SSM Health Cardinal Glennon Children’s Hospital.

“Cases where this works are really highly publicized. There’s a lot of social media attraction to it and those are great and we’re happy about those. But we know this isn’t going to work for every patient, just like every other medicine we have.”

Patients must first try three traditional prescriptions without success.  The marijuana strain that’s cultivated for its CBD oils does not contain the psychoactive THC, which hurts brain development, but Dr. Goretzke says there’s no research to answer whether CBD oil could still present risks.

“The majority of kids we are treating with this substance are so delayed from the burden of their seizures, maybe from the side effects of their other medications, that we feel the potential benefit for this medicine far outweighs those risks,. But with a typically developing child we’re still just not quite sure yet.”

He acknowledged they must start somewhere, but said it would help if there was research money to help answer their concerns.  Dr. Goretzke also said this is not a mandate and the hospital will respect individual doctors who might not want to be part of it.

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Hemp Industries Association Files Petition Against DEA


Hemp Industries Association Files Petition Against DEA to Defend Lawful Hemp-Derived Products from Agency Overreach
19 Jan 2017 5:41 PM

Suit Seeks to Defend Hemp Farmers, U.S. Businesses and Consumers from Illegal Attempt to Schedule Non-Psychoactive Hemp Derivatives as ‘Marihuana Extract’
WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Hemp Industries Association (HIA), the leading non-profit trade association consisting of hundreds of hemp businesses, filed a Petition for Review on January 13, 2017, in the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco, seeking to block the implementation of the Drug Enforcement Administration’s (DEA) recently announced Final Rule regarding “Marihuana Extract.” The proposed DEA Final Rule attempts to unlawfully designate hemp-derived non-psychoactive cannabinoids, including cannabidiol, as “marihuana extract,” and append the Controlled Substances Act to add all cannabinoids to its Schedule I. Furthermore, this action by the DEA contravenes clear Congressional intent and legal parameters for the production and consumption of hemp-derived products containing cannabinoids, enacted by Sec. 7606 of the Agricultural Act of 2014 (Farm Bill).

To read the full petition, please visit:

https://hoban.law/sites/default/files/2017-01/17.01.13%20Petition%20%5Bfinal%5D.pdf

The DEA does not have the authority to augment the Controlled Substances Act; that power resides with Congress. Congress has clearly mandated, through the 2014 Farm Bill and the 2016 Omnibus Spending Law that the Controlled Substances Act does not apply to hemp grown in state pilot programs, and that it is a violation of federal law for agencies such as DEA to interfere with these programs. The DEA’s proposed rule regarding cannabinoids thumbs its nose at Congress and threatens to undermine the market for legal hemp products containing cannabinoids, including those produced in the U.S. under state laws that regulate hemp cultivation and processing pursuant to, and in accordance with the federal Farm Bill. These products, such as hemp foods and supplements, fall outside the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) and are not subject to regulatory control by the DEA.

“Hemp-derived products containing cannabinoids are an increasingly in-demand category within the hemp market—and U.S. consumers constitute the largest market for hemp products worldwide,” said Colleen Keahey, Executive Director of the Hemp Industries Association. “We are committed to defending the rights of our members, of entrepreneurial hemp farmers, businesses and consumers, who all are acting entirely within the legal framework of the CSA and Farm Bill, including those adversely affected by trying to source American-grown hemp and hemp derivatives to supply this demand. The DEA’s attempt to regulate hemp derived products containing cannabinoids lawfully sourced under the CSA, and farmed and produced under the Farm Bill in states like Kentucky and Colorado, is not only outside the scope of their power, it’s an attempt to rob us of hemp’s economic opportunity.”
The DEA has made previous attempts to interfere with legal hemp products, notably from 2001-2003 when the agency contended that hemp food products such as cereals, hemp seed and hemp oil, are a Schedule I substance due to trace insignificant residues of tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC. On February 6, 2004, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in response that hemp is not included in Schedule I; that the trace THC in such products is similar to trace opiates in poppy seed bagels, and does not render them controlled substances. The HIA believes this 2004 ruling sets strong legal precedent for the current petition, which asserts that cannabinoids derived from lawful portions and varieties of the Cannabis plant exempted from control under the CSA and through the Farm Bill, may not be regulated as “marihuana” or “marihuana extract” by the DEA.

More recently, in 2014, the DEA interfered with the implementation of state pilot programs for hemp farming, when the agency unlawfully seized 250 lbs. of certified industrial hemp seed imported from Italy. The viable hemp seed had been legally sourced to supply six hemp research projects licensed by the Kentucky Department of Agriculture and coordinated in conjunction with Kentucky State academic institutions. The seed was quickly released, following the filing of a lawsuit against the DEA on May 14, 2014 by then Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner, now U.S. Congressional Representative James Comer.
“Over a decade ago, the Ninth Circuit held that non-psychoactive hemp is not controlled by the CSA,” said Patrick Goggin, co-counsel for the HIA. “The DEA is again attempting to schedule under the CSA cannabinoids and non-psychoactive hemp beyond its authority. We believe the Ninth Circuit will invalidate this rule just like it did in 2004.”
To date, 31 states have passed hemp legislation that allows their farmers to cultivate hemp according to guidelines set forth in the Farm Bill. Per these guidelines, U.S. farmers planted nearly 10,000 acres of hemp in 2016. Farmers and agri-business across the country have invested many millions of dollars in infrastructure to comply with federal law; this retroactive misreading of statute puts the livelihood of these law-abiding companies and individuals at risk.
Recent DEA pronouncements indicate that DEA is threatening to flout prior court rulings, and assert regulatory authority over hemp seed, oil, and products made from hemp seed and oil, which have always been exempt from the Controlled Substances Act. HIA continues to monitor these developments, and will consider further actions to resist DEA’s unlawful attempts to regulate legal hemp products.
# # #
The Hemp Industries Association (HIA) represents the interests of the hemp industry and encourages the research and development of new hemp products. More information about hemp’s many uses and hemp advocacy may be found at www.TheHIA.org.

HELLO, I’m SUING YOU!


CBD Oil Lawsuit To Reverse DEA Ruling?

By Jessica Leone

January 16, 2017

CBD Oil Companies File Lawsuit Against DEA

 

Last month, the DEA enacted a ruling that would establish a Controlled Substance Code Number for all marijuana based derivatives, including CBD oil. The final rule was called “Establishment of New Drug Code for Marihuana Extract” and included a clause that made CBD oil, a non-psychoactive oil derived from marijuana, a Schedule I substance. The ruling declares that everything containing any element of a marijuana plant is a controlled substance. This places CBD oil (which is usually used as a natural anti-seizure medication, anti-inflammatory and pain reliever) in the Schedule I category, alongside heroin and LSD, as one of the most dangerous drugs, containing no medicinal value. The decision upset the already booming cannabis and hemp industry that have countless products on the market that have not presented any problems.

The Groups Behind the CBD Oil Lawsuit

legitimacy-of-dea-anti-cbd-oil-ruling-called-into-question

The DEA’s ruling against CBD oil has resulted in a group lawsuit against the DEA.

With the cannabis industry in a state of panic and upheaval following the decision, 2 hemp companies and a fellow associate have decided to file a lawsuit against the DEA, claiming they have overstepped their bounds and put an entire well established industry at risk. Hemp Industries Association, Centuria Natural Foods and RMH Holdings LLC have contracted the services of Hoban Law Group, a firm based out of Denver, Colorado that specializes in marijuana related issues.

Hoban’s Statement

The attorneys at Hoban filed the lawsuit which stated that “the final rule creates this new drug code, indicative of being a controlled substance, for substances which are in fact not controlled pursuant to the (Controlled Substances Act). Specifically, the final rule dictates that the mere presence of ‘cannabinoids,’ which are not controlled substances, is the determinative factor of whether a compound is a ‘marihuana extract’.”

The DEA Stands By Its Decision

2014 farm bill may protect cbd oil from dea ruling

Language in the 2014 Farm Bill may actually protect hemp from the DEA ruling.

Russ Baer, spokesperson for the DEA, has stated that he cannot comment on a petition that he has seen but he has made it clear that the DEA stand by their ruling. He says that every single aspect of marijuana, including hemp, is considered a controlled substance. This includes every compound, derivative, salt or preparation of any substance made from any part of a cannabis plant. He claims that, until the DEA receives conclusive scientific proof of the plant’s medicinal benefits from a DEA registrant or person given authority by the DEA to research marijuana, it will remain a Schedule I substance and so will all its derivatives. Until now, the DEA has not authorized the medicinal research of marijuana which means there has been no way of establishing any DEA approved proof. They have, however, decided that they will begin to approve medical research although there are many hoops to jump through before research can be undertaken.

The lawsuit disagrees, claiming that under the Controlled Substances Act, the mature stalk of a marijuana plant can be used legally. The 2014 Farm Bill also allows states to create industrial hemp laws. It is also legal to import industrial hemp. Since CBD oil can be made from industrial hemp, it cannot technically be termed illegal. Hoban is stating in the lawsuit that the DEA has no legal authority to declare something that is currently legal illegal without approval from Congress. The lawsuit asks the court to overturn the final rule of the DEA.

CONTINUE READING…

The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research (2017)


THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS HAS RELEASED A NEW RESEARCH BOOK REGARDING THE HEALTH EFFECTS OF CANNABIS.  PLEASE USE LINK PROVIDED TO REVIEW.

 

The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: The Current State of Evidence and Recommendations for Research

 

Description

Significant changes have taken place in the policy landscape surrounding cannabis legalization, production, and use. During the past 20 years, 25 states and the District of Columbia have legalized cannabis and/or cannabidiol (a component of cannabis) for medical conditions or retail sales at the state level and 4 states have legalized both the medical and recreational use of cannabis. These landmark changes in policy have impacted cannabis use patterns and perceived levels of risk.

However, despite this changing landscape, evidence regarding the short- and long-term health effects of cannabis use remains elusive. While a myriad of studies have examined cannabis use in all its various forms, often these research conclusions are not appropriately synthesized, translated for, or communicated to policy makers, health care providers, state health officials, or other stakeholders who have been charged with influencing and enacting policies, procedures, and laws related to cannabis use. Unlike other controlled substances such as alcohol or tobacco, no accepted standards for safe use or appropriate dose are available to help guide individuals as they make choices regarding the issues of if, when, where, and how to use cannabis safely and, in regard to therapeutic uses, effectively.

Shifting public sentiment, conflicting and impeded scientific research, and legislative battles have fueled the debate about what, if any, harms or benefits can be attributed to the use of cannabis or its derivatives, and this lack of aggregated knowledge has broad public health implications. The Health Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids provides a comprehensive review of scientific evidence related to the health effects and potential therapeutic benefits of cannabis. This report provides a research agenda—outlining gaps in current knowledge and opportunities for providing additional insight into these issues—that summarizes and prioritizes pressing research needs.

Topics

 

CONCLUSIONS FOR: THERAPEUTIC EFFECTS
There is conclusive or substantial evidence that cannabis or cannabinoids are effective:
• For the treatment for chronic pain in adults (cannabis) (4-1)
• Antiemetics in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (oral cannabinoids) (4-3)
• For improving patient-reported multiple sclerosis spasticity symptoms (oral cannabinoids) (4-7a)
There is moderate evidence that cannabis or cannabinoids are effective for:
• Improving short-term sleep outcomes in individuals with sleep disturbance associated with obstructive sleep apnea
syndrome, fibromyalgia, chronic pain, and multiple sclerosis (cannabinoids, primarily nabiximols) (4-19)
There is limited evidence that cannabis or cannabinoids are effective for:
• Increasing appetite and decreasing weight loss associated with HIV/AIDS (cannabis and oral cannabinoids) (4-4a)
• Improving clinician-measured multiple sclerosis spasticity symptoms (oral cannabinoids) (4-7a)
• Improving symptoms of Tourette syndrome (THC capsules) (4-8)
• Improving anxiety symptoms, as assessed by a public speaking test, in individuals with social anxiety disorders (cannabidiol)
(4-17)
• Improving symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (nabilone; one single, small fair-quality trial) (4-20)
There is limited evidence of a statistical association between cannabinoids and:
• Better outcomes (i.e., mortality, disability) after a traumatic brain injury or intracranial hemorrhage (4-15)
There is limited evidence that cannabis or cannabinoids are ineffective for:
• Improving symptoms associated with dementia (cannabinoids) (4-13)
• Improving intraocular pressure associated with glaucoma (cannabinoids) (4-14)
• Reducing depressive symptoms in individuals with chronic pain or multiple sclerosis (nabiximols, dronabinol, and nabilone)
(4-18)

PLEASE CONTINUE TO LINK HERE

What is CBD? The Everyday Guide to Cannabidiol


Industry authority, CannaInsider.com, publishes comprehensive guide detailing the high-demand cannabinoid.

News provided by

CannaInsider.com

Dec 20, 2016, 08:35 ET

BOULDER, Colo., Dec. 20, 2016 /PRNewswire/ — CannaInsider.com, the cannabis industry’s leading site for interviews with the leaders of the legal marijuana, cannabis industry, has published a comprehensive guide to CBD, the miracle cannabinoid endorsed and made popular in 2013 by a documentary produced by mainstream media health expert, Dr. Sanjay Gupta of CNN.

Cannabidiol (CBD) is one of over 80 chemical compounds found in the cannabis plant called cannabinoids. Cannabinoids bind to receptors in the brain and body and are responsible for the effects of cannabis, like feeling high, relaxed, or euphoric. The most popular cannabinoid, THC, is widely known as the compound that produces a high feeling.

How CBD Works with your Body

How CBD Works with your Body

What is CBD?

What is CBD?

CBD, which is rapidly gaining popularity, is known for its immense healing properties that are just being discovered as scientific research into the cannabis plant expands. Gupta’s documentary profiled five-year-old Charlotte Figi, who reduced her 300 seizures a week to just one a day with CBD treatment. CannaInsider’s Guide details what the scientific community knows about CBD and explains how the legal marijuana industry is responding. Learn more about CBD with CannaInsider’s Guide: http://www.cannainsider.com/reviews/what-is-cbd/.

“CBD is quickly expanding beyond the medical marijuana community and into totally new demographics (senior citizens and athletes, to name just two). This rapid growth is certain to continue as more and more individuals discover how CBD can play a positive role in their own healthcare outcomes,” said Patrick O’Malley, President of Good Life Colorado — the world’s only marijuana product incubator.

Dr. Noel Palmer, Ph.D., The Chief Scientist at Mary’s Medicinals, an infused products company in Denver is equally enthusiastic the excitement around CBD, “CBD has amazing therapeutic efficacy for a large variety of conditions, but it doesn’t get you stoned. For those who want a plant-derived medicine, CBD is an great option with very few negative side effects.”

In the CNN documentary, Figi treated her severe Dravet Syndrome with a CBD oil produced by the popular Colorado-based brand, Realm of Caring, made from a strain of high CBD cannabis plants. However, CBD can also be found in the hemp plant. Hemp products are distributed nationally and are regulated by the Department of Agriculture. You can purchase CBD online and have it shipped to your home within the United States.

So, how do you distinguish between what’s quality and what’s not? CannaInsider.com also reviews CBD oil and products with in-depth analysis and pictures at: cannainsider.com/reviews.

As America’s fastest growing industry, the legal cannabis industry is navigating unchartered territory by producing and selling products made from a versatile plant that has been in the shadows for the last 80 years. CannaInsider.com has published a glossary of terms related to the marijuana plant and industry to educate those interested in learning more. Explore this dictionary at: http://www.cannainsider.com/reviews/glossary/.

What is CBD? The Everyday Guide to Cannabidiol
CannaInsider.com provides a free detailed and comprehensive guide that breaks down the magic of the CBD for everyone. You can find the guide at: http://www.cannainsider.com/reviews/what-is-cbd/.

About CannaInsider.com
Each week, Matthew Kind, the host of the CannaInsider Podcast, interviews the leaders of the cannabis industry to help listeners understand both the incredible opportunities and dynamics of this rapidly evolving industry.

Learn more at http://www.cannainsider.com/

Media Contact:
Matthew Kind
843-603-3699
138307@email4pr.com

Ananda Hemp Comments on Recent DEA Ruling


News provided by

Ananda Hemp

Dec 19, 2016, 11:26 ET

 

LEXINGTON, Ky., Dec. 19, 2016 /PRNewswire/ — Last Wednesday, December 14th, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) issued a ruling on the coding of “marihuana extracts.” Many questions have arisen in the marketplace from those concerned that the intention of the agency was to seemingly classify hemp-derived extracts containing Cannabidiol (CBD) Schedule I substances.

Ananda Hemp and our parent company Ecofibre have sought legal advice and believe the Final Rule published by DEA doesnot change the legal status of CBD as this can only be done by a scheduling action which has NOT occurred. We are within the belief that the ruling was a mere administrative action and not an attempt to bypass any Congressionally imposed laws such as the 2014 Farm Bill, or any other necessary judicial process.

We strongly believe that our farming operations and products obtained under those operations are, and will continue to be, compliant and legal in all 50 states:

  • Cannabidiol (CBD) is not listed on the federal schedule of controlled substances;
  • Sec. 7606 of the Farm Bill defines hemp as distinct from marijuana and is therefore removed from the definition as a controlled substance when grown under a compliant state program;
  • The 2015 Congressional Appropriations act and corresponding 2016 Appropriations Act specifically defunded the DEA and other governmental agencies from interfering with the processing, use, or sale of industrial hemp that was cultivated in compliance with section 7606 of the 2014 Farm Bill;
  • The code assigned to “marihuana extract” in the rule is “Administration Controlled Substances Code Number” for the purposes of identification of substances on registration forms;
  • Therefore, the Final Rule published on December 14th was not a scheduling action but rather an administrative action related to record keeping

Ecofibre has been working in the state of Kentucky since 2014 and operated under the full extent of section 7606 of the 2014 Farm Bill. To date the company has invested millions of dollars in the region and created a broad range of jobs and farming salaries in Central Kentucky. This year we contracted 500 acres of industrial hemp production and have recently completed yet another successful harvest season. Our brand, Ananda Hemp, has recently entered the marketplace in good favor with consumers and channel partners as we now endeavor to enter into the market research phase of our 5-year pilot program.

Our company will continue to scale our operations in Kentucky and the USA alike by continuing to contract industrial hemp production with American farmers and bringing quality, domestically-produced products to market for sale in all 50 states.

About Ecofibre

Ecofibre is an Australian company that maintains one the world’s largest and most diverse seed banks of cannabis sativa germplasm, which includes several certified industrial hemp cultivars.

Ecofibre has strong research partnerships with several leading Universities and currently utilizes its licenses to grow industrial hemp for the purposes of research and production.

Ecofibre is privately funded by some of Australia’s leading business leaders as well as Joy and Barry Lambert, the most noted cannabis philanthropists in the industry.

Contact
Eric Wang
+61 (0)403 570 377 
eric.wang@ecofibre.com.au

About Ananda Hemp

Ananda Hemp is a premier provider of health and wellness products that are exclusively derived from industrial hemp cultivated compliantly in Kentucky, USA under the accordance of section 7606 of the 2014 Farm Bill.

Contact
John Ryan
+1 858 405 8615
john@anandahemp.com

SOURCE Ananda Hemp

What is the DEA up to now? What are they doing to our CBD?


When the news hit the fans today concerning the DEA’s “new rule” on the sale of CBD remedies and other products everybody jumped up and said “WHAT?”, or at least I did!

I had been so wrapped up in the Kratom issue lately I hadn’t even been thinking about CBD’s.  Low and behold, I thought, while I was looking over ‘here’, ‘they’ were conjuring up a

new “rule” over ‘there’.  Something else to be able to use to fill up the Courts, Jails, even Prisons with.  It just never ends.  Every time that we as a people come upon anything that may be

legal at the time, that actually may be worth using, and could possibly benefit us in one way or another, ‘They’ come along and snatch it right out from under us.

That is what Agenda 21 (Agenda 2030) is  all about!  Control of the masses through regulation of food and medicines, (among other things).

THIS is unacceptable!  This must stop!  We cannot allow the Government, whether it be State, Federal or U.N., to be able to have this kind of control over our food and other natural plants!

Before the pharmaceutical conglomerates ever existed it was the herb gardens which provided the medicine to the households.  This is referenced throughout history.

After reading updates and trading information with others who are watching these issues closely as well, it seems like the DEA is just trying to stand up and make some noise so as to get everyone a little worried.

I am copy/pasting a letter here that was forwarded to me from a colleague which states that legally they cannot prosecute for CBD oil as long as it is below .3% THC.

This having been said, the DEA memo states the following:

The memo states: it serves to clarify and reinforce the DEA’s position on all cannabis extracts, including CBD oil. That position is: They are all federally illegal Schedule I substances. “Extracts of marihuana will continue to be treated as Schedule I controlled substances,” the notice says. CBD oil derived from hemp is now commonly available nationwide via web sites and mail order services. Those operations survive on the assumption that cannabidiol products below the legal threshold for THC percentage in hemp (0.3 percent or less) are technically legal. Not so, says the DEA.

“For practical purposes, all extracts that contain CBD will also contain at least small amounts of other cannabinoids. However, if it were possible to produce from the cannabis plant an extract that contained only CBD and no other cannabinoids, such an extract would fall within the new drug code” and therefore remain federally illegal. In other words: The DEA is confident that it can find enough traces of other cannabinoids in your CBD oil to arrest and prosecute. And if they can’t, they still have the option of arresting and prosecuting based on the CBD oil itself.

Now the question becomes this, will the DEA use this “rule” to stage raids and arrests for marketing CBD products?  Knowing that according to the information I have here from the Folium Legal Counsel anything under the .3% threshold cannot be prosecuted, they can still use it to fill up the Courts and jails and maybe even some Prisons while collecting Fines and Court Costs as well, because not everyone will be able to afford to go to Court and fight the charges, much like Marijuana is now.

So how do we go forward with this information and what do we do to change it?  Start by calling the White House and complaining!  Obviously the current Government as it stands now has lost all touch with its people.  It is not because they are stupid, ignorant, or ill-informed.  It is because they know exactly what they are doing, and they DO have a plan.

It is time that the people make their own plan.  To take back our Country.

Remember the United States of America, the Land of the Free and Home of the Brave?

I want it back now.

SK

 

 

A MESSAGE FROM FOLIUM LEGAL COUNSEL REGARDING THE DEA’s MEMO:

On December 14, 2016, the United States Drug Enforcement Administration published a final rule regarding the “Establishment of a New Drug Code for Marijuana Extract.” ( https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2016/12/14/2016-29941/establishment-of-a-new-drug-code-for-marihuana-extract)
This new rule does not create any new substantive regulation or law regarding the legal status of marijuana or marijuana extract. Instead, it creates a new tracking code number for “Marihuana Extracts” (which include cannabinoids).

Previously, Marijuana Extracts were classified under the code number for “Marihuana. Under the new rule, extracts are now classified separately. The DEA uses these codes to track quantities of controlled substances imported to and exported from the United States. This new rule affects only DEA-registered entities who previously were required to track such materials. As the document states, “[t]he only direct effect to registrants who handle marihuana extracts will be the requirement to add the new drug code to their registrations.” The rule goes into effect on January 13, 2017.

Regarding the legal status of CBD derived from industrial hemp: The 2014 US Farm Bill was an act of congress signed by the president and that is the highest law of the land. The DEA cannot make law and try to redefine a law passed by the US Congress which defined industrial hemp in section 7606 as “Any cannabis sativa L that produces naturally less than .3% THC on a dry weight basis.”
Furthermore, the DEA is not allowed to interfere with a legal state licensed cannabis business – there is very recent case law that set precedent for this in the 9th circuit. See here:
http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-ruling-marijuana-idUSKCN10R1YN
Lastly, the DEA was purposely de-funded by the US Congress last year (and is poised to do the same for this year:
(http://archives.sfweekly.com/thesnitch/2015/12/16/congress-set-to-ban-feds-from-enforcing-cannabis-laws-again) from pursuing any enforcement of their archaic interpretation of the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) in legal states.

We hope this information helps you and your customers filter through the mis-information and fear mongering that usually runs rampant anytime a government memo affecting cannabis is circulated. If you have any further questions feel free to contact us directly, but it’s business as usual over here!

 

 

 

The DEA May Have Just Flipped The Script on the Cannabis Industry And Not In A Good Way

If you are licensed to work with marijuana extracts, you have 30 days from today to update your paperwork. Also, Cannabidiol (CBD) extracts are now Schedule I substances and can’t cross state lines.

Did the DEA Just Outlaw Hemp-Derived CBD?

A new rule published by the DEA today led many in the cannabis industry to assume the worst – that the agency had decided to crack down on hemp-derived CBD. Take a deep breath. This is likely not the case.

New DEA Rule Says CBD Oil is Really, Truly, No-Joke Illegal

The US Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) made CBD oil a little more federally illegal in a little-noticed bureaucratic maneuver this morning.

New DEA Rule Says CBD Oil is Really, Truly, No-Joke Illegal


Bruce Barcott

December 14, 2016

The US Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) this morning made CBD oil a little more federally illegal in a little-noticed bureaucratic maneuver this morning.

Today’s Federal Register (Dec. 14, 2016) contains an item (21 CFR Part 1308) that establishes a new drug code for “marihuana extract.”

“This code,” wrote DEA Acting Administrator Chuck Rosenberg, “will allow DEA and DEA-registered entities to track quantities of this material separately from quantities of marihuana.” The move, the Register entry explained, is meant to bring the US into compliance with international drug-control treaties.

There is no major change in law brought about by the Register item. Rather, it serves to clarify and reinforce the DEA’s position on all cannabis extracts, including CBD oil. That position is: They are all federally illegal Schedule I substances.

CBD oil derived from hemp is now commonly available nationwide via web sites and mail order services. Those operations survive on the assumption that cannabidiol products below the legal threshold for THC percentage in hemp (0.3 percent or less) are technically legal.

Not so, says the DEA.

In the DEA comment on the entry, Rosenberg directly addressed the question: What if it’s only cannabidiol (CBD) and no other cannabinoids? The agency’s response: “For practical purposes, all extracts that contain CBD will also contain at least small amounts of other cannabinoids. However, if it were possible to produce from the cannabis plant an extract that contained only CBD and no other cannabinoids, such an extract would fall within the new drug code” and therefore remain federally illegal. In other words: The DEA is confident that it can find enough traces of other cannabinoids in your CBD oil to arrest and prosecute. And if they can’t, they still have the option of arresting and prosecuting based on the CBD oil itself.

RELATED STORY

Is CBD from Cannabis the Same as CBD from Cannabis?

Is your CBD derived from hemp? Doesn’t matter to the DEA. The new extracts classification applies to all “extracts that have been derived from any plant of the genus Cannabis and which contain cannabinols and cannabidiols.” Hemp is not a separate genus. (Although it may be a separate species; lot of debate on that point.) Legally speaking, hemp is simply cannabis with no more than 0.3 percent THC content.

The new rule seems to clarify the DEA’s position on hemp-derived CBD, which entered a legal gray area following Congress’ passage of the 2014 farm bill. That legislation allowed certain states to grow hemp in pilot projects, and blocked federal law enforcement authorities (ie, the DEA) from interfering with state agencies, hemp growers, and agricultural research.

What DEA Administrator Rosenberg seems to be saying with this clarification is: You may be able to grow hemp. But if you try to extract CBD oil from it, the DEA considers that a federal crime.

The rule did not contain any hint as to when the DEA will step into the 21st century and stop using the archaic version of the word “marihuana.”

Lead Image: Brennan Linsley/AP

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