Category Archives: KENTUCKY

Kentucky Senate approves repeal of Common Core standards in schools


By Valarie Honeycutt Spears and Jack Brammer

vhoneycutt@herald-leader.com

The Kentucky Senate on Friday unanimously approved a wide-ranging public education bill that would establish a new process for intervening in low-performing schools and establish a new process for reviewing classroom academic standards.

Under Senate Bill 1, revisions would be made to the Kentucky academic standards in 2017-18 and every six years after that. Teams of educators from public schools and higher education would recommend changes with suggestions from citizens.

Senate Bill 1 would repeal the controversial Common Core academic standards, but not until the new standards are rolled out in a staggered fashion, the bill’s sponsor State Sen. Mike Wilson, the chairman of the Senate Education Committee, has said.

Kentucky was the first state to adopt the Common Core standards and subsequently incorporated them into the Kentucky academic standards. Those standards, which have undergone other revisions, define what Kentucky students should learn at each grade level. How the standards are taught is decided by local schools.

There was no debate on the bill in the Senate on Friday but two Democratic senators praised Wilson, R-Bowling Green, for his handling of the measure that was approved on a 35-0 vote.

Sen. Julian Carroll, D-Frankfort, said there is no need to question the bill because Wilson has done a good job explaining it to all involved. Wilson contacted educators, policymakers and citizens, including families of students, as he developed the bill.

Sen. Gerald Neal, D-Louisville, said Wilson’s approach to listen to all parties involved “is exactly how this body ought to function.”

Senate President Robert Stivers, R-Manchester, said this is the third year Wilson has worked on this “major piece of policy.”

He said it combines the realities, demands and desires of returning control of school systems back to locals.

Also under Senate Bill 1, a new assessment system would still rate schools but would not use a single numerical score that ranks schools against each other. Local districts would establish their own evaluation systems for teachers, principals and other staff aligned with a statewide framework. Evaluation results would not be reported to the state education department.

The bill now goes to the House of Representatives.

Valarie Honeycutt Spears: 859-231-3409, @vhspears

CONTINUE READING…

Lawmaker says top issue for constituents is marijuana; oncologist advocates for safe access


02/12/2017 12:39 PM

Far and away the largest number of phone calls from constituents of Rep. Jason Nemes, R-Louisville, are in support of marijuana legalization, and he says he’s heard plenty of other lawmakers also getting the calls.

Nemes recently published online what voters are calling him about, and in a phone interview with Pure Politics he said the calls on marijuana come in three forms: advocating for medical marijuana in pill form, medical marijuana that can be smoked and full-scale state legalization of the federally illegal drug.

“I’m getting contacted on all three of those areas, I don’t know where I am on it, but the Kentucky Medical Association tells me there’s no studies that show that it’s effective,” Nemes said in a phone interview on Wednesday.

Dr. Don Stacy, a board certified radiation oncologist who works in the Kentucky and Indiana areas, said there’s a reason there’s no studies proving effectiveness — studies have not been allowed to take place.

“It’s one of those things where we can’t provide randomized phase three studies in cannabis without making it legal — that is the gold standard for any sort of medicine,” Stacy said. “We have a variety of studies of that nature from other countries of course, but American physicians are very particular about American data. The database we have now is plenty enough to say we shouldn’t be arresting patients for trying to help themselves.”

Stacy said he became interested in marijuana after he noticed some of his patients were doing better with treatment than similar patients. In reviewing their records and through private discussions with the patients, he learned “a significant portion” of those doing better were the patients using marijuana.

“I was surprised by that,” he said. “I’ve always been a skeptic of alternative medicines, but then I began to research the data. I was impressed with the data.”

Dr. Stacy said he’s had some particular patients who showed minor or moderate improvements or side effects, but patients who had to stop treatment because the toxicity of the treatment was so severe. The patients who had to stop treatment tried marijuana, and then they were able to complete their treatments showing “dramatic differences,” Stacy said.

Because of the improvements in patients, Stacy is advocating for safe and legal access to the drug.

Twenty-eight states and the District of Columbia allow access to medical marijuana in different forms. Through those states allowing access, Stacy said several show improvements outside of overall medical care.

In states that have legalized medical marijuana the suicide rate has dropped by 10 percent among males 18 to 40, he said.

“It says when people have serious medical or behavioral issues — if you cannot find the treatment that helps you then some people decide to end their lives, and cannabis apparently prevents a certain portion of people from doing that.”

Stacy said that there is also a 10 percent decrease in physicians prescribing narcotics in medical marijuana states. The effect of that, Stacy said is a 25 percent decrease in overdose deaths linked to narcotics in states with medical cannabis laws. With the level of heroin and opiate abuse in Kentucky, he said there would be positive effects seen here too.

“I think that one-quarter of the people who will overdose and die of narcotics in this state in this year would be alive if we had a medical cannabis law.”

CONTINUE READING…

Kentucky: House Introduces Constitutional/Permit less Carry Legislation


Tuesday, February 14, 2017

The Kentucky House of Representatives introduced their own constitutional/permit less carry bill. House Bill 316, sponsored by Representative C. Wesley Morgan (R-81), recognizes Kentuckians’ freedom to legally carry a concealed firearm without the burdensome requirement of acquiring a Kentucky concealed deadly weapons license. It is of the utmost importance that this bill be scheduled for a hearing as soon as possible.

Your NRA-ILA would like to thank Representative Morgan and the House Leadership for understanding the urgency of this important legislation. The 2017 legislative session is short, and constitutional/permit less carry legislation must progress fast through the legislative process to have a chance at being signed into law this year.

HB 316 would allow any law-abiding individual who can legally possess a firearm to carry a handgun for self-defense in Kentucky without having to obtain a permit to do so.  This bill recognizes a law-abiding adult’s unconditional Right to Keep and Bear Arms for self-defense in the manner he or she chooses.  Self-defense situations are difficult, if not impossible, to anticipate.  Accordingly, a law-abiding adult’s right to defend himself or herself in such situations should not be conditioned by government-mandated time delays and taxes.  Additionally, this constitutional/permit less carry legislation would keep the current permitting system in place so individuals who obtain a permit could still enjoy the reciprocity agreements that Kentucky has with other states.

Please contact your state Representative and state Senator in support of House Bill 316 and Senate Bill 7 by calling 1-800-372-7181.  Please continue to check www.NRAILA.org and your email inbox for alerts on the latest action items.

(KY) HB 147 College immunization bill clears House committee


For Immediate Release

February 9, 2017

College immunization bill clears House committee

FRANKFORT—Whooping cough. Measles. Meningitis. Just hearing these words can strike fear in most any parent or school teacher.

But it’s not just young school children who are at risk. College and university students can also get communicable diseases says Dr. Patty Swiney, a Kentucky family physician and mother who testified alongside House Health and Welfare Chair Addia Wuchner, R-Florence, today in support of Wuchner’s House Bill 147. The bill would require students to submit proof of immunization against measles, mumps, rubella and meningococcal disease before enrolling at Kentucky public or private colleges or universities with residential campuses starting this fall.

HB 147, also sponsored by Rep. Danny Bentley, R-Russell, a pharmacist, passed the House Health and Welfare Committee and now goes to the House floor for consideration.

Swiney said college students living in close quarters like dormitories are susceptible to communicable diseases which are “vaccine-preventable.”

“They live, eat and, we all hope, study in close quarters,” said Swiney, but they are likely to write off illness symptoms as fatigue from too much studying or something else. She mentioned an outbreak of measles at Disneyland in 2015 in which 147 people were infected by “a single, non-vaccinated person.”

“Luckily there were no deaths, but a significant number of work and school days were missed… and all of this was preventable,” said Swiney.

Wuchner, a trained nurse, said HB 147 would exempt students who object to medical vaccination on religious grounds in a written sworn statement. It would also exempt students enrolled only in online or other distance-learning classes. Others, she explained, would have to receive what she called “catch-up” immunizations to protect themselves and those around them.

“As a nurse, I have strong memories of the first case of meningococcal meningitis that I ever encountered, and they will stay with you forever,” she said.

–END–

 

HB 147 (BR 471) – A. Wuchner, D. Bentley
     AN ACT relating to the vaccination of postsecondary students.
     Create a new section of KRS Chapter 164 to require students entering postsecondary education institutions to submit documentation of vaccination for diseases required by the Cabinet for Health and Family Services; provide for religious exemption; provide that the cabinet is not required to pay for the vaccinations.

KDA proposes legislation to help feed the hungry


Ag News

 

Proposals would double tax credit for donated food, strengthen liability protections

For Immediate Release
Monday, January 30, 2017
For more information contact:
Angela Blank
(502) 573-0450

FRANKFORT, Ky. — The Kentucky Department of Agriculture (KDA) has come forward with legislation to help businesses and .individuals who wish to donate food to organizations that serve hungry Kentuckians.

“These measures would provide incentives and protections for those who want to join the fight against hunger in Kentucky,” Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles said. “This is due to the work of the Hunger Task Force, which met for the first time last spring. This is just the beginning of our efforts to reduce food insecurity in the Commonwealth.”

One proposal would double the tax credit for food products donated to food banks to 20 percent. The current tax credit is 10 percent and is scheduled to expire at the end of this year. Quarles also called for the tax credit to be made permanent. Few Kentucky farmers know about the tax credit, and even fewer use it. The state Department of Revenue reported that only one taxpayer was approved to claim the credit in its first two years. Quarles said this measure would provide a stronger financial incentive for farmers to donate surplus foods.

A second proposal would strengthen the shield against legal liability for food donations beyond that of the federal Good Samaritan Food Donation Act, making Kentucky’s food donor immunity shield one of the strongest in the nation. The measure would provide a stronger immunity shield for individuals and businesses, and their employees, who donate to food banks; for food banks and their employees; and for landowners who allow gleaners to come onto their land to pick vegetables and fruits for the hungry.

Commissioner Quarles launched the first-of-its-kind Kentucky Hunger Initiative and formed the Hunger Task Force last spring to bring together farmers, businesses, charitable organizations, faith groups, community leaders, government entities, and others to study food insecurity in Kentucky and take an inventory of the resources that can be utilized against the problem.

To raise awareness of the scope of the hunger problem in Kentucky, the KDA will join the Kentucky Association of Food Banks to host the annual Rally to Solve Hunger on Feb. 7 at 1 p.m. EST at the Capitol Rotunda.

Map the Meal Gap 2016, an annual study by Feeding America, revealed that one in six Kentuckians – including one in five children – was food insecure in 2014, meaning that consistent access to adequate food is limited by a lack of money and other resources at times during the year. Kentucky organizations that serve the hungry fed an estimated 58 million meals to approximately 611,000 Kentuckians in 2016.

For more information about the Hunger Initiative and the Hunger Task Force, go to kyagr.com/hunger.

Kentucky Cops Confiscate $600k In Marijuana & Brag About It


 

Published on Aug 9, 2016

Deputies in Grayson County, Kentucky found more than $600,000 worth of marijuana hidden in a corn field, confiscated it and then left a note stuck in the corn leaves letting the growers know about it. Deputies then started the hashtag #WeGotYoWeed in a Facebook post to taunt the growers…
Read More At:
http://www.rawstory.com/2016/08/kentu…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5rQv8LepIvk

Ignorance abounds in Kentucky concerning cannabis law


 

In October, farmworkers transported harvested marijuana plants at Los Suenos Farms, America’s largest legal open-air marijuana farm, in southern Colorado.

 

The following story was printed on Kentucky.com and my response is included.

By Thomas Vance

The world is watching Colorado and is finding out that everything we have been told by our government about marijuana has not been factual, to put it nicely.

Colorado legalized medical marijuana in 2012 and recreational in 2014. They have paid more than $150 million in taxes on $1.3 billion in sales for 2016 and have created more than 20,000 full-time jobs in the process and none of the predicted harms of legalization have materialized.

California has had an easy access medical marijuana program for 20 years and none of the terrible things we have been told will happen should cannabis be legal have happened.

All we have to do is copy Colorado’s regulations and standards and get on with it. What are we waiting for? The people in our eastern counties are praying for something to replace the coal industry. God has one ready to go for us and we are ignoring his help.

It’s like the old joke about the guy trapped on his roof in a flood. He prays for God to save him. A helicopter comes by and offers to pick the man up. “No, no, thanks anyway but God said he would save me.”

After a while a boat comes and offers to pick up the man. Again he says no because, “God will save me.”

Later on that night, the waters rose and the man drowned. When he gets up to Heaven He asks God, “Why, why God, didn’t you save me?” and God replies, “I sent you a boat and a helicopter, why didn’t you get in?”

Let’s take this winning lottery ticket the good Lord has given us: an industry safer and healthier than coal. Alleviate the suffering of our eastern counties, create thousands of jobs, garner millions in revenue, enable billions in economic activity and put that money to work for the citizens of our great state.

It would seem that if we get to the end of this legislative session and nothing is done, one could reasonably conclude the Republican-controlled legislature is being derelict in its duty to improve the lives and the well being of our citizens and our state.

Thomas Vance of Alexandria is senior adviser for Veterans for Medical Cannabis Access.

Sample of comments:

H.B. Elkins ·

Media Consultant at Kentucky Valley Media Consulting

Industrial hemp, medical marijuana and recreational marijuana are three distinctly different and separate issues. Far too many times, advocates have appeared to champion the first two and then they show their true colors and advocate for the third. This puts a cloud of suspicion over the motives for supporting industrial hemp and medical marijuana.
You do your cause no favors by mentioning Colorado’s approval of recreational use if you are really advocating medical use. I suspect you are really for full legalization and are just using medical use as an incremental step.
Be honest about your motives. It won’t make me support recreational legalization — I don’t — but it will allow me to respect your efforts.

 

MY RESPONSE:

It is people like HB and JOHN below who are complicit in keeping the repeal of cannabis hemp laws out of KY. Unfortunately most of the politicians in KY have the same mindset.

It all boils down to who has the money now and who they don’t want to have any in the future.

Personally, I am not a legalizer, I am a repealer, meaning that I believe all Cannabis statutes from the Federal Government and UN should be abolished as they are illegal to begin with in my opinion. (Do your own research because I am tired) Legalization renders to regulation which renders to incarceration because, well, what can be more profitable than the prison industrial complex?

This plant has been useful for all of humanity’s existence and will continue to be,  regardless of whether it is legalized or not. (Again, do the research).. The sad part is all the people that could be helped (and one day it may be YOU) that will suffer and die needlessly because of evil people whose only concern in life is how much money they can scarf up from everyone else.

In the meantime, many peoples lives are being saved or at least made better by an illegal plant that God put here, by people who are risking there very lives to get this to those that need it – real patients.

Yes, there are those of us who enjoy smoking a good cannabis ‘cig’ – It helps relieve the mind of stress and pain. Sure is a lot better than the alcohol which most people consume on a daily basis and end up dying from in the long run…

So, I guess until everyone gets their heads on straight about Cannabis, everyone will continue to suffer from statutes, regulation, and imprisonment because people are either too stupid to educate themselves, or are too evil to care.

Which one are YOU???

sk

SOURCE AND LINK TO ORIGINAL ARTICLE ON KENTUCKY.COM

Seminars to provide information on Kentucky’s hemp industry


 

Below and attached you will find details for a series of hemp seminars to be held across the state.  The seminars are a collaborative effort of the UK Cooperative Extension Service, Kentucky Hemp Research Foundation, Kentucky Hemp Industries Association and Kentucky Department of Agriculture.  I highly recommend that participants in our Industrial Hemp Research Pilot Program and anyone interested in hemp research attend one of these seminars.  This is a good opportunity to learn more about hemp in general.  These seminars should NOT be confused with the mandatory orientation meetings for pilot program participants.   See attached for more details of the daily agenda and the full press release from UK.

Please call the corresponding extension office to reserve your free lunch.

Thanks,

Doris

2017 Kentucky Industrial Hemp Seminars

· January 30, 2017   Christian County Extension Office     270-886-6328

· January 31, 2017    Clark County Extension Office           859-744-4682

· February 9, 2017   Shelby County Extension Office         502-633-4593

NEWS

Contact: Tom Keene, 859-257-3144

Seminars to provide information on Kentucky’s hemp industry

By Katie Pratt

LEXINGTON, Ky., (Jan. 17, 2017) – New and experienced industrial hemp producers and interested individuals can get a broad overview of hemp production and the Kentucky hemp industry at one of three regional meetings.

The meetings will be at the following University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service offices: Jan. 30 in Christian County, Jan. 31 in Clark County and Feb. 9 in Shelby County. They are a collaboration between the Kentucky Hemp Industries Association, Kentucky Hemp Research Foundation, UK Cooperative Extension Service and the Kentucky Department of Agriculture. All the meetings will begin at 10 a.m. local time and end at 4 p.m.

“These meetings will give producers and processors good information about the hemp industry in Kentucky and will get them ready to grow and process hemp this year,” said Tom Keene, UK agronomy specialist.

“Our strategic objective is to position the commonwealth’s growers and processors to ultimately prevail as national leaders in industrial hemp production,” Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles said. “These regional meetings will help us achieve that objective. We appreciate the opportunity to work with our partners to inform the participants in the Industrial Hemp Research Pilot Program.”

The KDA Industrial Hemp Research Pilot Program has tripled its acreage for the upcoming growing season, bringing the total to 12,800 acres.

Topics on the agenda include hemp marketing, hemp agronomics, the KDA’s Industrial Hemp Research Pilot Program and KDA policies. Presenters include Keene, Doris Hamilton, program manager of KDA’s Industrial Hemp Research Pilot Program, and representatives from Kentucky’s hemp industries.

More information is available by online at https://hemp.ca.uky.edu/ or by contacting each host site. Those numbers are 270-886-6328 for Christian County, 859-744-4682 for Clark County and 502-633-4593 for Shelby County.

Writer: Katie Pratt, 859-257-8774

UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment through its land-grant mission, reaches across the commonwealth with teaching, research and extension to enhance the lives of Kentuckians.

http://www.ca.uky.edu

AGRICULTURAL COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES • COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, FOOD AND ENVIRONMENT • UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

131 SCOVELL HALL, LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY 40546-0064

PHONE (859) 257-4736 • FAX (859) 257-1512
The College of Agriculture, Food and Environment is an Equal Opportunity Organization.

Doris Hamilton

Industrial Hemp Program Manager

Department of Agriculture

Office of Marketing

111 Corporate Drive

Frankfort, KY 40601

Doris.Hamilton@ky.gov

502-782-4113

KY Amish Farmer Jailed over a Salve Label; the FDA Wants Him Jailed for Life


By Sally Oh on January 15, 2017

Girod indictment: Sam's 3 products: chickweed salve, bloodroot salve and an essential oil blend

I know it sounds like I made up a terribly inflammatory headline… but it’s not JUST inflammatory. It’s true, the Girod indictment is below.

Amish farmer Sam Girod of Owingsville makes 3 products: a chickweed salve, a bloodroot salve and an essential oil blend called Sine Eze. The photo of the 3 products was just taken on my iPad on my desk. You can find similar products online. In fact, you’ll find the recipes online. You can make these products in your kitchen, it’s not rocket science.

A few years ago, the FDA came after Sam for labeling crimes — Sam said his salves could cure certain things and that’s a big FDA no-no. Sam immediately fixed the labels as per FDA demands.

But then the FDA fixated on him and just would not let go. You’ll see in the indictment. In my line of hobby work (political blogging), I’ve seen this over and over and over again. An alphabet agency gets you in its sights and just will not quit.

And why would they quit? No skin off their teeth and gives them something to do. State agencies are bad enough, but the feds… the feds are especially lawless. There is no accountability in a federal agency, they break their own rules as a matter of course.

I have a little inside info on why this persecution is taking place plus a couple of questions. “Inside info” because I’m involved in food and health freedom, so aware of persecution of other farmers around the country.

The first thing of note is that, when it comes to powerful well-funded federal agencies looking to set precedent, the Amish have a special target on their backs. Why? Because they generally don’t use lawyers which makes them easy prey. They don’t use lawyers because the Amish are self-sufficient, they know their constitutional rights and they are a peaceful community. They don’t fight back (unless lives are at stake).

The FDA is also after an enormously successful Amish farm in PA, Miller’s Organic Farm. Like Sam, the Millers have established a private club whereby only members can purchase products. As a member of Miller’s Organic Farm, I can order anything I want, including raw milk, that can be shipped to me anywhere in the country. (Read up on the Miller’s case here.)

The FDA hates private membership clubs because club sales and products are NOT subject to FDA rules and regulations! Private memberships are protected under the Constitution’s contract clause. I can contract with anyone I want, sell them anything I made or produced, and the state may not interfere. The state, of course, hates this kind of freedom and will do anything it can to pierce that veil. Including bankrupting businesses and jailing a peaceful farmer for the rest of his life.

The FDA also seems to have a special soft spot for bloodroot salves. They’ve been persecuting makers of bloodroot salves for decades, starting with Greg Caton, jailing him twice and driving him from the country. A quick search brought up this company as well.

Two questions:

  1. Why was Sam kept handcuffed during the hearing on Friday. Was he a flight risk or a danger to anyone? IMO, the gov was attempting to show Sam who’s the boss. Newsflash: the gov is not Sam’s boss.
  2. Why did the FDA wait so long to formally charge Sam? Most of his alleged crimes (Counts 1-11) took place between 9/2013 and 1/2014 with the M.M. situation (Count 12) in 12/2014. If Sam is so dangerous that he needs to be jailed for life… why did they wait for years to charge him?

Here comes the Girod indictment.

This is pretty long but a lot the counts are basically repeats with different dates. The gov likes to pad the bill so the defendant will take a plea.

Remember, folks, we are talking about a Chickweed Salve here along with two other equally benign, non-drug products that are for sale all over the world, that I and my friends have used with no ill-effects (in fact, to good effect). Is the purpose of this prosecution to protect the public or to punish those citizens who don’t kneel at the pointy end of a bureaucrat’s pen (and, in this case, firearm)?

The FDA vs Kentucky Amish Farmer Samuel A. Girod

PLEASE CONTINUE READING HERE!

Mother fighting to save daughter through medical marijuana


marijuana

By MELISSA REINERT

The Kentucky Enquirer

WILLIAMSTOWN, Ky.

Tiffany Wigginton Carnal is in the fight of her life to save her daughter.

Lyndi Carnal, 17, has Crohn’s Disease, an inflammatory bowel disease that causes inflammation of the lining of the digestive tract, which can lead to abdominal pain, severe diarrhea, fatigue, weight loss and malnutrition. Lyndi was diagnosed when she was 14. Since that time, she and her mother have spent three Christmases, three New Year’s Days and countless other days at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital.

The medications Lyndi has taken to control the Crohn’s and subsequent pain have negatively impacted her heart, kidneys and liver. Lyndi has also had her colon and rectum removed. The medications to control the pain keep Lyndi sedated and unable to function. One of her medications, Dilaudid, is a strong opiate that can be addictive.

“These medications are making children drug addicts. Lyndi has gone through withdrawals,” Tiffany Carnal said. “Lyndi was once a cheerleader and a beauty pageant winner, she won all over the state. Now she is bed-ridden and not able to function. As a parent, I have to ask, ‘How can I help my child?’ ”

The answer, according to Carnal, is illegal.

“I started doing my own research and learned that medical marijuana can help children who have Crohn’s Disease,” she said. “However, this is illegal in our state.”

The Carnals reside in Williamstown, Kentucky, where the use of marijuana, even for medical purposes is against the law. In 2016, Sen. Perry Clark introduced Senate Bill 13, a bill that would end marijuana prohibition for adults in the Commonwealth and create a regulated and taxed system. The legislature adjourned, however, without taking action on the bill. The bill — Cannabis Freedom Act — to legalize medical marijuana use in the state, will be presented to the legislature in 2017.

Carnal has been busy writing and calling her state representatives to encourage passage of the bill.

“I’m not at all for recreational use of marijuana, but there are facts that marijuana oil helps children with epilepsy, Crohn’s and cancer,” Carnal said.

According to the Mayo Clinic, medical marijuana is marijuana used to treat disease or relieve symptoms. Marijuana is made from the dried leaves and buds of the Cannabis sativa plant. It can be smoked, inhaled or ingested in food or tea. Medical marijuana is also available as a pill or an oil.

Also according to the Mayo Clinic, studies report that marijuana has possible benefits for several conditions. Crohn’s is on that list.

“It’s so frustrating that I can’t give my child a natural oil that could help her and not cause her other organs to fail or for her to be on a constant high,” Carnal said. “I can’t do that, but I can give her drugs that are killing her. There’s got to be a better way. There is. Things… the law… just have to change.”

This last bout with complications from Crohn’s almost took Lyndi’s life. She has been at Children’s for two months and was recently taken off life support. She’s on the mend, but the road ahead will be tough. She’s looking at two more months at Children’s.

“She has survived,” Carnal said. “She’s still here and for a reason. And that reason is not to spend her life in the hospital. Me? I’m going to fight to make sure she can get a natural treatment that will help her and not bring harm to her. That is my job as a parent.”

Read more here: http://www.heraldonline.com/news/article126600394.html#storylink=cpy