Category Archives: KENTUCKY WEED

Genius Extraction Technologies, a California company the produces hemp and cannabis oil extraction equipment, announced plans to build a new $400,000 hemp processing facility in Winchester


 

 

The Sunday Drive: Kentucky, others getting on board with hemp

Posted: Monday, July 11, 2016 11:37 am

By Steve Foley The Winchester Sun | 1 comment

Section 7606 of the Agricultural Act established in 2014 is quickly making it’s presence felt here in the Bluegrass.

That, my friends, is a good thing.

The Agricultural Act of 2014 allowed certain states including Kentucky to start farming hemp again after a ban of almost 60 years. 

While it will probably take a few years before we fully know if hemp can replace a significant portion of the income lost with the disappearance of tobacco and coal revenue, there’s a plethora of Kentuckian entrepreneurs, farmers and manufacturers who already are staking their future on it.

The hemp revitalization began soon after Feb. 7, 2014, when the Agricultural Act bill was signed into law. It authorized five-year pilot programs throughout universities and state departments of agriculture. 

As of today, there are 28 states including many in the South which have been approved to grow industrial hemp — some for research and some for commercial value. For the next four years, hemp can be grown and processed to produce fiber for textiles, paper and building materials, as well as seed and oil for food, beauty products, biopharmaceuticals and fuel.

It’s been well advertised Kentucky is the epicenter for hemp, as U.S. Sen. Rand Paul, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner James Comer have made the state a leader in industrial hemp production.,

Now, farmers across the state including many former tobacco farmers are planting hemp seeds that have been grown in the country since the crop was banned nearly 60 years ago.

Last year, the Kentucky State Department of Agriculture  licensed more than 100 programs at universities, private farms and processing sites. One of them is here in Clark County located off Colby Road at Atalo Holdings, Inc, a 27-acre farm of cannabinoid-rich plants.

Last month, Genius Extraction Technologies, a California company the produces hemp and cannabis oil extraction equipment, announced plans to build a new $400,000 hemp processing facility in Winchester.

The facility will be located at Atalo’s Hemp Research Campus on Colby Road, where early testing and setup has been underway since March.

The company expects to process some 250,000 pounds of hemp for commercial uses in the fall for Atalo and its subsidiaries, Super Food Processing and KentuckyCBD.

Across the state, hemp pilot programs have dramatically increased over the past year with hundreds participating and close to 4,500 acres of hemp being planted.

According to a recent report from SurfKY News, Governor’s Office of Agricultural Policy Executive Director Warren Beeler told the Tobacco Settlement Agreement Fund Oversight Committee Atalo Holdings’ hemp contracts this year cover over half of the 4,500 acres planted statewide.

Atalo got its start with $492,000 in state funds pulled from a 16-year-old settlement between the state and cigarette manufacturers after Kentucky made state-sponsored research legal in 2013, Beeler said.

It was the first project to receive state tobacco settlement dollars for a hemp-related project, the GOAP reported last year, and it is currently processing its product from last year into protein powder and other legal hemp products.

Many other hemp operations are also at work across the state, and most hemp grown are being used for cannabidiol or CBD, a lucrative hemp compound believed to have medicinal benefits.

Kentucky passed a law in 2014 that excludes CBD oil from the definition of marijuana for certain epileptic patients.

CBD oil is just one product in today’s ever increasing hemp market. How large the hemp market will grown remains to be seen.

“How big is the market? We don’t know that,” Beeler said in the same SurfKY News story, telling the Tobacco Settlement Agreement Fund Oversight Committee he hopes hemp production can eventually replace lost tobacco income. “We went from 33 acres (or industrial hemp initially) to somewhere in the neighborhood of 4,000 to 5,000 this year, and I don’t think anybody much is raising this stuff who doesn’t have a contract or place to get rid of it.

“Who knows where we might be in 20 years?”

Contact Steve Foley at steve.foley@winchestersun.com or follow him on Twitter @SteveFoley8.

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Hemp farmer contends harassment at justice center


Sergeant discussed issue with deputies, considers matter closed

 

A Bowling Green hemp advocate and business owner claims he was ordered to leave a baseball cap with a hemp leaf logo on it with court security personnel as he entered the Warren County Justice Center on Thursday.

Chad Wilson, who owns Modern Farm Concepts and is vice president of sales and marketing for hemp products company Green Remedy, said he accompanied his son to the justice center to get his driver’s license.

After passing through the metal detectors in the front lobby of the justice center, Wilson, who was wearing a T-shirt and hat promoting Green Remedy, said a deputy told Wilson he would have to leave the hemp-logo hat with court security or else he would have to leave.

Hemp and marijuana are both part of the cannabis plant genus, but hemp is genetically different and generally has negligible amounts of THC, the active chemical in marijuana.

Kentucky and several other states have legalized the cultivation and research of industrial hemp, which can be used in the making of paper, fabrics, cosmetics and several other products. Hemp growers, however, must get permission from the federal Drug Enforcement Administration to raise the crop.

Green Remedy is one of 167 registered participants in this year’s Kentucky Industrial Hemp Research Pilot Program.

Wilson attempted to explain what was on his hat and that he was a licensed grower, but court security officers said that Wilson’s hat promoted marijuana, Wilson said Friday.

“I was told basically that I had no right to come into a government building that my taxes paid for,” Wilson said. “I didn’t want to make a scene because I was trying to be a good dad, but I should have stood for my rights.”

Wilson said he gave the hat to court security officers, who stored it in a lock box until he left the justice center. As he left, Wilson recorded a video of himself in which he gave an account of the incident and posted it to his Facebook page.

Later on Thursday, Wilson said he went to the Warren County Sheriff’s Office to complain about how he was treated and that Chief Deputy Maj. Tommy Smith apologized.

The court security officers are a division of the sheriff’s office.

Sgt. Andy McDowell said he was apprised of the situation after Wilson went to the sheriff’s office and he met with the court security officers on duty to discuss the incident.

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KDA seeks applications for specialty crop projects


 

Ag News

 

For Immediate Release
Thursday, March 3, 2016
For more information contact:
Angela Blank
(502) 573-0450

FRANKFORT, Ky. – Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles announced that farmers and other eligible applicants in Kentucky may seek funding from the Kentucky Department of Agriculture for producing and marketing “specialty crops.”

Specialty crops are defined by the U.S. Department of Agriculture as fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, dried fruits, and horticulture and nursery crops.

“Our soils and climate are conducive for Kentucky to be a major producer of specialty crops,” Commissioner Quarles said. “In today’s global economy, we’re looking for applicants that will make our specialty crops more competitive not only in this country but around the world.”

Eligible producers, commodity groups, agriculture organizations, colleges and universities, municipalities, state agencies, and nonprofit organizations may apply. The maximum award to any applicant is $50,000, but the KDA encourages applications for lesser amounts.

Applications should show how the proposed project would produce measurable benefits for the specialty crop industry and/or the public rather than just a single entity. Grant funds will not be awarded for projects that solely provide a profit for a single organization, institution, or individual. Matching funds are encouraged but not required.

Applications must be postmarked no later than June 1. Projects cannot begin until the U.S. Department of Agriculture has made its official award announcement, expected in November. The program is funded by a Specialty Crop Block Grant of more than $200,000 from USDA. The KDA administers the program in Kentucky.

To download the application form, rules, eligibility requirements, and guidelines, go to www.kyagr.com/marketing/crop-block-grant.html. For more information, contact Joshua Lindau, the Kentucky Department of Agriculture’s plant marketing specialist, at (502) 782-4115 or joshua.lindau@ky.gov.

The Man Who Brought Hemp to Kentucky (Gatewood Galbraith)


By Sarah Baird on January 12, 2015

 

After decades of being demonized and damned, hemp is now officially sprouting its way back into Kentucky’s good graces.

Since the successful cultivation of the state’s first small-but-mighty legal “research” hemp crop early last year, politicians on both sides of the aisle have been eating hemp bars, talking about hemp-powered cars and exploring how hemp oil can help ease the pain of debilitating seizure disorders. There’s a new fervor around everything that could possibly be crafted with hemp — from rope to clothes — as the crop positions itself to potentially be the tobacco-replacing cash crop dreamed about by struggling farmers.

For those who have been watching the battle unfold, it seems to be a cruel twist of fate that hemp has gained thoroughbred-like momentum in the state two short years since the death of its colorful, decades-long champion: Gatewood Galbraith.

The pop music scene and art world have their fair share of celebrities famous enough to go by a single name, from Beyoncé to Bono. In Kentucky, Gatewood was the only man in the state (and perhaps, all of politics) to find mononymous notoriety. All Kentuckians knew Gatewood, but many did not know his last name.

In Kentucky, Gatewood was the only man in the state (and perhaps, all of politics) to find mononymous notoriety.

Gatewood was nothing short of a cult figure. Known far and wide as the hemp-promoting, pro-gun, big-grinning, marijuana-loving lawyer — who ran unsuccessfully for governor five times — Gatewood was a perennial character in Kentucky politics who refused to be boxed into party lines. Above all else, Gatewood believed the two-party system had failed the working class people and farmers of the state. With his lilting drawl, gentle demeanor and signature (completely non-hipster) fedora, the gangly, Ichabod Crane-like man was a 6’4″ fixture at intersections and street fairs for more than 40 years, shaking hands and talking — mostly — about the virtues of hemp as a cash crop.

“When I first met Gatewood, it was at his election night party in 2002 when he ran for Congress,” says former Kentucky Democratic Party Executive Director Jeremy Horton. “It was two rooms connected at the old-school Continental Inn [in Lexington]. About an hour in, I found my way into his room. There were about ten people inside and Gatewood was sitting on the bed, shirtless, wearing a sombrero, smoking a cigar and talking about farm subsidies.”

Born in the bucolic town of Carlisle and educated at the University of Kentucky for both his undergraduate degree and law school, Gatewood was consistently a man before his time. His positions on key environmental, farming and rural issues often positioned him as a zany outlier in the 1980s and 1990s. Now, many of his views seem downright mainstream: from hemp as a cash crop to medicinal marijuana to supporting and promoting small farmers. In retrospect, it’s easy to see Gatewood as a kind of pied piper on these issues, attracting Kentucky politicians slowly and steadily over the years with his song until, eventually, some of them joined the march.

Between campaigns for statewide office, Gatewood made a name for himself as a defense attorney, including serving as pro bono counsel in the country’s first felony medical marijuana case. He fought against the spraying of paraquat in the Daniel Boone National Forest in the 1980s, gaining national attention for his prescient opposition to the toxic herbicide. (The New York Times referred to him in 1983 as, “…an unsuccessful candidate for state agricultural commissioner … who favors legalizing marijuana.”) He opposed the mountaintop removal method of mining in Eastern Kentucky, noting that it had caused “unsurpassed environmental damage” across the region. His real calling card, however, was hemp.

“Cannabis is to hemp as Dennis Rodman is to Danny DeVito. They’re both adult males, but if you can’t distinguish between the two you don’t belong in law enforcement,” Gatewood famously told a Lexington, Kentucky. alt-weekly in 2000, his gently ribbing nature softening a hard-hitting truth.

Photo courtesy Kentucky Educational Television.

Photo courtesy Kentucky Educational Television.

Everywhere he traveled, Gatewood touted the economic benefits of industrial hemp as a cash crop, citing Kentucky’s long and successful history as a hemp-producing state prior to its prohibition in 1937. He found allies in nooks and crannies not often touched by politics, from elderly farmers whose families had successfully grown hemp in the early part of the 20th century to enterprising entrepreneurs who could see how the legalization of hemp could jumpstart stagnant rural economies.

“One hundred years ago, the farmer produced all of the fiber, all of the medicine, all of the fuel and all of the food that society consumes,” Gatewood told a team of documentarians in the 1990s. “Does the government have the right [today] to tell man or woman that they cannot plant a seed in God’s green earth and consume the green natural plant that comes up out of it? That seems such an inalienable right.”

Of course, the virtues of marijuana were also never far from his rhetoric. Old ladies would frequently clutch their pearls when Gatewood openly discussed smoking weed — which he claimed cured his asthma as a young man — and called to end the prohibition of marijuana in the state for medicinal purposes.

State Senator Perry Clark of Louisville honored his late friend posthumously in 2013 by introducing the Gatewood Galbraith Memorial Medical Marijuana Act, which aimed to loosen regulations around the prescription of marijuana. While the bill didn’t pass, it served as a call to action and a tribute to Gatewood’s trailblazing ways.

“For the better part of 40 years, [Gatewood] has been talking about the benefits of medical marijuana,” Clark told The Daily Chronic in 2012. “And right now there are hundreds of thousands of Kentuckians who are suffering and they need and deserve access to this plant that our grandfathers and our great grandfathers grew by the thousands of acres.”

Gatewood’s left field stances and larger-than-life persona also attracted a number of celebrity friends and admirers. In 1991, Gatewood appeared — a toothy grin spread wide across his face — on the cover of High Times with friend and fellow pot-smoking icon Willie Nelson, who campaigned on his behalf from Louisville to Lexington. When Woody Harrelson was arrested in 1996 for planting four hemp seeds in Lee County, Kentucky as a deliberate challenge to state cannabis laws, Gatewood was right by his side in support. Four years later (after Harrelson was acquitted) the two starred in the 2003 film, Hempsters: Plant the Seed.

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Sometimes, the cold, hard facts rattled off by Gatewood were overshadowed by his flamboyant stump-speaking mannerisms and propensity for offbeat humor. Gatewood was often known to refer to politicians (particularly, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell) as “aliens” and believed firmly in “the petro-chemical-pharmaceutical-military-industrial-transational-corporate-fascist-elite-bastards” complex, which he frequently referenced at speaking engagements and in his now infamous book, The Last Free Man in America: Meet the Synthetic Subversion.

“The problem is that the pharmaceutical and petrochemical industries control this country,” Gatewood said in a 1991 interview. “Hemp is the greatest product. Hemp is petroleum. It’s no coincidence that in 1937 when hemp was outlawed, nylon was patented. The true battle on this planet today is between the naturals and the synthetics.”

A consummate advocate for family farms and policies to help reconnect individuals to the land, it’s almost impossible to imagine that Kentucky’s current bipartisan bear hug of hemp would’ve happened without Gatewood’s maverick campaigning.

“He arrived [at a Tea Party function] and everyone said, ‘Oh, Gatewood, you know, thank you so much for coming. It’s wonderful to have you here,’” Galbraith’s 2011 gubernatorial running mate, Dea Riley, told NPR in 2012 after his death. “And Gatewood responded, ‘What are you talking about? I’ve been here for 30 years. Where have you people been?’”

The tide may be turning for Gatewood to get his due as the bullhorn that paved the way for the state’s recent hemp victories. A dedicated group of hemp advocates and Gatewood devotees are planning the first ever “Kentucky HempFest” for September 2015 in honor of their late, great patron saint.

The event’s alternative name? Gatewoodstock.

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Kentucky hemp was king before steamships, free trade and reefer madness


Widely used fiber plant was key to Lexington’s early wealth and prosperity

Ropewalks and bag factories once stood amid city’s historic neighborhoods

FBI later went to UK historians seeking evidence slaves, field hands got high

 

 

By Tom Eblen

teblen@herald-leader.com

 

Hemp has been branded an outlaw for decades because it looks like its mind-altering botanical cousin, marijuana. But before steamships, free trade, synthetic fibers and reefer madness, this useful plant was Kentucky’s biggest cash crop.

Kentucky grew most of America’s hemp throughout the 1800s, but it was often a tortured relationship.

An undated postcard shows a Kentucky hemp field.

An undated postcard shows a Kentucky hemp field. University of Kentucky Special Collections

“Except for the history of tobacco, no other Kentucky field crop has undergone so many frustrating turns of fortune or come under such intense scrutiny,” the late state historian Thomas D. Clark wrote in 1998, describing hemp’s “aura of romance and … cloud of evil.”

Kentucky’s earliest settlers brought hemp seeds over the mountains with them. Archibald McNeill planted the first recorded crop in 1775 near Danville. Farmers soon realized that Central Kentucky’s rich soil and plentiful rainfall made it an ideal place to grow the most widely used fiber for rope, sailcloth and industrial bags.

Kentucky hemp farmers were never trying to get high — just rich.

John Wesley Hunt, Kentucky’s first millionaire and builder of the Hunt-Morgan house, made his fortune in the hemp industry, as did his next-door neighbors, Thomas Hart and Benjamin Gratz. Hart’s son-in-law, the politician Henry Clay, was a big hemp grower and advocate for the crop in Congress.

Several Bluegrass plantation owners named their mansions Waveland because they were surrounded by fields of lacy-topped hemp waving in the breeze.

Slavery was as important to Kentucky’s hemp industry as rich soil and plentiful water. Harvesting and preparing hemp before modern processing machines was difficult, back-breaking work that few people did by choice.

After growing tall in summer, hemp stalks were cut at first frost, shocked and then spread out on the ground to begin to rot. After this curing, a device called a hemp brake was used to separate fiber from the stalk. The fibers were then twisted into rope or spun into fabric.

During the half-century before the Civil War, hemp was Lexington’s biggest industry. The city had 18 rope and bag factories in 1838 that employed 1,000 workers — an impressive number for a city of 6,800 people.

Long sheds or open-air “ropewalks” were built around town for hemp fibers to be twisted into rope. An 1855 Lexington map shows several ropewalks and bag factories in the blocks north of Short Street.

Future Confederate general John Hunt Morgan and his wife’s brother, Sanders Bruce, who would become a Union colonel, had one of the city’s largest hemp factories on East Third Street behind the mansion now called Carrick House.

One of Lexington’s last remnants of the antebellum hemp industry is a small brick cottage on East Third Street, across from the log cabin on Transylvania University’s campus. It was the office of Thomas January’s ropewalk, which spread out behind it.

The biggest markets for hemp were sailcloth and rigging for ships and the growing Southern cotton trade, which used hemp rope and bags to package cotton bales. The Navy was a large but fickle client, despite the political clout Kentuckians wielded in Washington.

The peak years of hemp production, in the 1850s, saw Kentucky produce 40,000 of the 71,500 tons of hemp fiber grown in America. The Civil War began a great unraveling of Kentucky’s hemp industry and its biggest client, the Southern cotton industry, both of which depended on slave labor. Then things got worse.

Sailing ships were soon replaced by steamships, causing the sailcloth market to plummet. But the biggest blow was free trade agreements that removed tariffs on Asian jute, which was much cheaper to grow and process than hemp.

The hemp industry shrunk considerably, but Kentucky still dominated it. Ten Central Kentucky counties produced 90 percent of America’s hemp in 1889. Hemp remained the state’s biggest cash crop until 1915, when tobacco became king.

But more trouble was ahead. After Prohibition’s repeal in 1933, reformers focused on outlawing narcotics. Hysteria surrounding this first war on drugs included the famous 1936 anti-marijuana propaganda film, Reefer Madness. Hemp was swept up in a 1937 marijuana law, although it got a reprieve in the early 1940s when Kentucky farmers were encouraged to grow hemp because World War II prevented the import of Asian jute.

Hemp contains little of the psychoactive chemical THC found in marijuana. Still, soon after World War II, the FBI asked the University of Kentucky’s History Department for evidence that slaves and field hands had tried to get high by smoking hemp leaves and blooms, wrote Clark, a history professor at the time.

“A case of a slave smoking hemp in the neighborhood of Owensboro could be documented,” he wrote, “but there was a vagueness about other instances.”

Tom Eblen: 859-231-1415, teblen@herald-leader.com, @tomeblen

Read more here

Soon Hemp May Be A Tradable Commodity With Startup Seed CX


February 17, 2016, 1:00 AM EST

 

You can trade gold and pork belly futures, why not hemp?

Raising venture capital is difficult for any first-time founders with a company that hasn’t yet launched. Multiply that by 100 when your startup has any tangential relationship to cannabis.

It is no surprise, then, that it took Edward Woodford, co-founder of Seed Commodities Exchange, a commodities trading platform for industrial hemp, to send 11,000 emails, travel 46,238 miles, and meet with 604 investors to raise Seed CX’s first round of funding. At one point, Woodford sent so many messages on LinkedIn that the service temporarily banned him.

It’s also little surprise that when Seed CX finally secured its $3.42 million convertible note, announced today, many of the company’s 50 investors declined to make their names public. The ones that it did include were lead investor Charlie O’Donnell of Brooklyn Bridge Ventures, Darren Herman, Tom Sosnoff, 500 Startups, iAngels, Struck Capital, Ron Geffner, David Adler, Christopher Lee, and Julien Codorniou.

The problem is not that Seed CX operates in a legal gray area — the platform only operates in areas where hemp farming is federally legal — or that its legal risk is any higher than a disruptive company like Uber or Airbnb. It’s that most investment funds have a “vice” clause, which forbids them from touching anything that sounds like drugs.

A number of venture investors liked Seed CX enough to invest their personal money. Seed CX’s investor list is rounded out by commitments from several trading platforms, Woodford says.

Seed CX’s commodities trading platform is powered by GMEX Technologies, a London-based subsidiary of financial technology company GMEX Group. Seed CX is awaiting regulatory approval by the Commodities Futures Trading Commission. The startup hopes to be up and running with its first commodities: hemp seed, whole hemp plant and whole hemp plant extract, by the time the farming season starts in May.

The market for commodities, which dwarfs the stock market, allows traders to buy and sell anything from precious metals like gold to farm products like onions. As the U.S. government cuts subsidies for tobacco, many farmers in Kentucky have begun growing and processing hemp. Currently there are around 100 hemp farmers in the U.S. and 150 hemp processors. (Hemp farming and processing is federally legal under the Agricultural Act of 2014, but only in states with the proper infrastructure, which currently includes Kentucky and 26 others. Hemp itself is legal everywhere.) Woodford would not disclose how many farmers and traders had signed up to use Seed CX when it launches.

If it gets regulatory approval, Seed CX will be the first trading platform for hemp. Many commodities trading platforms start out specializing in one type of commodity to maximize liquidity, Woodford says. From there, Woodford says Seed CX will expand into other “nascent, illiquid” commodities.

Woodford believes commodities traders will be eager to trade hemp because they like unique, idiosyncratic risks of a new market with a complicated legal framework. Also, many traders believe that the longer they are in a market before it becomes mainstream, the more edge they have. Likewise, for hemp farmers and processors, a commodities market allows them to lock in prices with derivatives contracts.

Even though hemp is made from cannabis, Woodford is not eager to be associated with the marijuana industry. “The perception of cannabis — sometimes it widens peoples’ eyes and sometimes it narrows them,” he says. “In Silicon Valley, it is a real turnoff.” That’s part of the excitement behind Seed CX, but Woodford is careful to note that hemp is different from marijuana.

Seed CX’s fundraising struggle speaks to the broader business world’s mix of fear and excitement around cannabis legalization. Few startups in the category have been able to raise venture capital from traditional institutional investors.

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When Woody Harrelson Planted Four Hemp Seeds Thu Apr 03, 2014


On June 1st, 1996, the sun rose lazily over Kentucky’s heartland. Thankfully, it wasn’t mid-summer yet in the Bluegrass State, when the land itself seems to be a source of heat, in addition to a blistering sun. I was in a car with Woody Harrelson, Kentucky hemp activist Joe Hickey and Woody’s attorney, another hemp activist named Tom Ballanco. We were speeding toward Beattyville, a tiny farming community of about 1,100 Kentuckians, where Woody had purchased a quarter-acre of land. That morning, he was orchestrating his own arrest.

Throughout our early history, the state of Kentucky was America’s primary hemp producer, harvesting crops as recently as World War II. But in 1996, hemp – an agricultural crop with deep roots in our history – was, and still is, classified as a Schedule One drug. All forms of cannabis are on this list of forbidden substances, along with heroin and LSD. Woody, who had become the most outspoken, high-profile celebrity to speak out against anti-cannabis laws, wanted to draw attention to this lunacy. That morning, he broke a small patch of ground with a hoe – wearing an all-hemp outfit, of course – and planted four non-THC industrial hemp seeds. Then, Joe Hickey called the county sheriff.

In 10 minutes, a police cruiser meandered up the road. Out stepped a kindly sheriff, obviously tipped off about the event, who asked Woody what he was up to.

‘Well, I just planted four seeds of hemp right here,” he said.

“Well, could you get them outta there please?” the sheriff asked.

Woody knelt down and dug around in the six-foot strip of Kentucky soil that he’d hoed earlier. But he was coming up empty. He rose, clapped the dirt off his hands and politely said: “Sir, I don’t want to disobey your orders and I don’t want to tell you your job, but I don’t think I’m gonna find ‘em.”

So Woody was busted and taken in – and made international news in the process. Over the next four years, he appeared in Kentucky courts several times, always with Hickey and Ballanco, and had a lot of fun in the media, exposing the shame of America’s War on Drugs and how it had outlawed a legitimate agricultural commodity.

But Woody never lost sight of the seriousness of his legal battle, even enlisting former Kentucky Governor Louie Nunn (now deceased) as part of his legal team. The charges were minor – a misdemeanor charge of marijuana possession – but Woody wanted to point out that Kentucky’s anti-cannabis laws made no distinction between industrial hemp and smokeable cannabis. Nunn’s contribution to his defense was a dramatic moment he provided by eating a hemp energy bar in the courtroom. “Now I’ve got hemp on me and in me. I guess you’re gonna have to arrest me, too!”

On August 24, 2000, a six-member jury deliberated about 25 minutes before returning with a verdict of “Not Guilty.” Woody and his legal team celebrated on the steps of the courthouse. But there was also a lot of anger on that day.

On that very morning, heavily armed DEA and FBI agents launched a raid on the hemp crop of Alex White Plume on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. It was a legal crop, sanctioned by the Oglala Lakota Tribal Council. There was no coincidence. The Feds chose to make a statement, eager to demonstrate their ultimate power on a day when they were powerless to stop a Kentucky jury from acquitting Woody Harrelson for planting four hemp seeds.

Four of these hemp seeds led to a four-year legal battle.

Above:  Woody celebrates on the Lee County courthouse steps with Tom Ballanco, Gov. Louie Nunn, Joe Hickey and lead attorney Charles Beal

Continue Reading…

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Due to civil action by the Drug Enforcement Administration and the U.S. District Attorney, White Plume is now barred for life by the federal government from cultivating and processing hemp

First Medical Marijuana Patient & Caregiver to be Convicted for Marijuana Possession and Cultivation Could Face Several Years in Prison After August 6 Sentencing

Woody Harrelson, Defense Lawyers to Call for Reduced Sentence for Patient & Caregiver B.E. Smith at 10:00A.M., July 29 Telephone Press Briefing

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: July 28, 1999

Lakota hemp growers headed for legal showdown

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Kentucky "Cannabis Freedom Act" Summary


legalize-marijuana-leaf-red-white-blue-flag-300x300

Kentucky Cannabis Freedom Coalition·Saturday, December 12, 2015

 

Cannabis Freedom Act Summary

Section 1

(New Section of KRS Chapter 245)

Definitions

Section 2

(New Section of KRS Chapter 245)

Personal possession, use, and cultivation limits

Persons 21 years and older may:

Possess up to 1 ounce of cannabis on their person;

Cultivate up to 5 cannabis plants;

Store excess cannabis lawfully grown for personal use at the location where it was cultivated; or

Transfer up to 1 ounce of cannabis to another person age 21 or older without remuneration

Possession exemption for persons under 21 if recommended by a licensed physician

Section 3

(New Section of KRS Chapter 245)

Prohibition on smoking cannabis in public

Maximum penalty: $100 fine

Section 4

(New Section of KRS Chapter 245)

Prohibitions on access to retail cannabis facilities,

Persons under 21 years of age shall not:

o Enter retail cannabis facilities to purchase cannabis or cannabis products;

o Possess, purchase, or attempt to possess or purchase cannabis or cannabis products;

o Misrepresent their age or use false identification to induce an illegal sale of cannabis or cannabis products; or

o Remain on any premises that sells cannabis or cannabis products

Licensees, their agents, or employees are prohibited from permitting persons under 21 years of age from remaining on any premises where cannabis and cannabis products are sold.

o Maximum penalty: Class B misdemeanor

Section 5

(New Section of KRS Chapter 245)

Prohibition on unlawful possession of cannabis

Maximum penalty: $250 fine

Section 6

(New Section KRS Chapter 245)

Personal cultivation requirements

Person who chooses to cultivate for personal consumption must take reasonable precautions to ensure that any cannabis or cannabis plants are secure from unauthorized access and access by persons under twenty-one years of age.

Persons shall only cultivate cannabis for personal consumption on property that they own or with the consent of the person in lawful possession of the property.

o Maximum penalty: $500 fine

Section 7

(New Section KRS Chapter 245)

Prohibition on unlawful cultivation of cannabis (ULCC) with the intent to sell or transfer it for valuable consideration ULCC of 11 or more cannabis plants

o Maximum penalty: Class D felony

ULCC of 6-10 cannabis plants

o Maximum penalty: Class A misdemeanor

ULCC of 5 or fewer cannabis plants

o Maximum penalty: Class B misdemeanor

ULCC of six or more cannabis plants creates a presumption that unlawful cultivation was for sale or transfer

Section 8

(New Section of KRS Chapter 245)

Department of Alcoholic Beverage and Cannabis Control (ABCC) to promulgate administrative regulations to implement various aspects of Act within 180 days of the Act becoming law.

Section 9

(New Section of KRS Chapter 245)

ABCC to create licenses to operate the following cannabis-related entities:

Cannabis cultivation facility;

Cannabis processing facility;

Cannabis testing facility; or

Retail cannabis facility.

Licenses created pursuant to this section shall cost $5,000 and be valid for 12 months from the date of issuance

Section 10

(New Section of KRS Chapter 245)

Licensure requirements

Applicant must pay nonrefundable $100 application fee which will be applied to their licensing fee if a license is issued to the applicant

ABCC shall:

Create uniform license application form;

Issue a license to an applicant unless:

o The applicant has been convicted of crime which would qualify them as a violent offender;

o The applicant falsifies information on the application for a license; or

o The applicant has had a previous license issued by ABCC revoked within the 12 months prior to the reapplication.

Section 11

(New Section of KRS Chapter 245)

Excise tax imposed on licensees operating cannabis cultivation facilities selling or transferring cannabis to either a cannabis processing facility or a retail cannabis facility.

Effective January 1, 2017:

$30 per ounce on all cannabis flowers

$10 per ounce on all parts of the cannabis plant other than the flowers

$10 per immature cannabis plant

Reporting requirements

Department of Revenue may prescribe forms and promulgate administrative regulations to collect taxes created under this section

Section 12

(New Section of KRS Chapter 245)

Creates a revolving trust and agency account from licensure, renewal, and administrative fees Account to be used for the enforcement of the Act by ABCC

Section 13

(New Section of KRS Chapter 245)

The Kentucky Responsible Cannabis Use Program (KRCUP) fund is created as a restricted fund

The KRCUP fund is comprised off all the excise tax revenue collected under Section 11 of the Act and all the sales and use tax revenue collected on cannabis and cannabis products.

The proceeds contained in the fund are to be distributed according to the following formula:

30% of funds to go the public school fund to support education excellence in Kentucky (SEEK);

20% of funds to go to the Kentucky Department of Education for scholarships based on socioeconomic need for students to attend public institutions of postsecondary education in Kentucky;

20% of funds to go to the Office of Drug Control Policy to dispense grants to substance abuse treatment programs that employ evidence-based behavioral health treatments or medically assisted treatment;

15% of funds to go to the Kentucky Law Enforcement Council to dispense grants to county and local law enforcement agencies to buy protective equipment, communications equipment, and training; and

15% shall be deposited into the general fund.

Section 14

(New Section of KRS Chapter 245)

$500 Civil penalty for each violation of KRS Chapter 245

$1000 Civil penalty for failing to maintain written tax records and reports required by the Department of Revenue

Section 15

(New Section of KRS Chapter 245)

Corporate and individual liability for violations of KRS Chapter 245

Section 16

(New Section of KRS Chapter 245)

Cannabis or cannabis products which are held, owned, or possessed by any person other than those authorized by KRS Chapter 245 is declared contraband.

The ABCC can dispose of contraband cannabis and cannabis products using the same procedures and protocols that they currently use for contraband alcoholic beverages.

Section 17

(New Section of KRS Chapter 100)

Prevents local political subdivisions with zoning power from:

Using their zoning power to institute a moratorium on cannabis-related entities;

Using their zoning power to discriminate against cannabis-related entities by treating them differently from other similar entities;

Using their zoning power to impose more stringent security requirements than those required by ABCC; or Imposing additional fees in excess of what other applicants seeking to operate a business are charged.

Section 18

(New Section of KRS Chapter 65)

Prevents county and local governments from instituting de facto or de jure moratoriums on cannabis related entities.

Section 19

(New Section of KRS Chapter 311)

Allows any licensed physicians acting in good faith to recommend cannabis or cannabis products to their patients.

Physicians who recommend cannabis or cannabis products to patients under the age of 18 must obtain parental consent and a second recommendation from another licensed physician.

Provides civil, criminal, and licensing immunity to physicians who, in good faith, recommend cannabis or cannabis products.

Section 20

(Amends KRS 12.020)

Renames the Department of Alcoholic Beverage and Cannabis Control

Establishes the Division of Cannabis

Section 21

(Amends KRS 241.010)

Amends definition of “board” and “department” to reflect the addition of cannabis

Section 22

(Amends KRS 241.015)

Renames the Department of Alcoholic Beverage and Cannabis Control

Section 23

(Amends KRS 241.020)

Empowers the Department of Alcoholic Beverages and Cannabis Control to regulate traffic in cannabis and cannabis products.

Creates the Division of Cannabis to administer the laws in relation cultivation, processing, testing, and sale of cannabis and cannabis products.

Section 24

(Amends KRS 241.030)

Adds one appointed position to the Alcoholic Beverage and Cannabis Control Board to act as director of the Division of Cannabis.

Section 25

(Amends KRS 2.015)

Amends the age of majority statute in regards to cannabis.

Section 26

(Amends KRS 218A.010)

Removes the definition of marijuana from Kentucky’s Controlled Substances Act.

Section 27

(Amends KRS 218A.050)

Removes marijuana, tetrahydrocannabinols, and hashish from the list of Schedule I controlled substances.

Section 28

(Amends KRS 218A.510)

Removes references to marijuana and hashish from the definition of drug paraphernalia.

Section 29

(Amends KRS 260.850)

Removes industrial hemp from the definition of cannabis.

Section 30

(Amends KRS 600.020)

Includes cannabis offenses in the definition of status offense action under Kentucky’s Juvenile Code.

Section 31

(Amends KRS 610.010)

Grants jurisdiction of juvenile cases involving cannabis to either the juvenile session of District Court or the family division of the Circuit Court.

Section 32

(Amends 630.020)

Adds cannabis offenses to list of status offenses which have to be adjudicated in juvenile court.

Section 33

(Amends KRS 218A.276)

Removes obsolete reference to marijuana statutes that would be repealed if this Act becomes law.

Section 34

(Amends KRS 630.120)

Prevents juveniles who are adjudicated guilty of cannabis offenses from being committed to the Department of Juvenile Justice for detention (mirrors alcohol and tobacco offenses).

Section 35

(Amends KRS 131.650)

Removes obsolete reference to a taxing statute which would be repealed if this Act becomes law.

Section 36

(Repeals KRS 138.870, 138.872, 138.874, 138.876, 138.878, 138.880, 138.882,138.884, 138.885, 138.886, 138.888, 138.889, 218A.1421, 218A.1422, 218A.1423)

Section 37

(Short Title: Cannabis Freedom Act)

INFORMATION SOURCE LINK

UPDATED LINK TO THE KENTUCKY LEGISLATURE WILL BE POSTED WHEN AVAILABLE!

KY Senator files "Cannabis Freedom Act" rolling medicinal and recreational use together in one hit


By Brad Bowman, Published: December 12, 2015 3:56PM

Clark talking about cannabis in a legislative committee meeting. Photo courtesy of the Legislative Research Commission.

Democrat Sen. Perry Clark of Louisville has advocated for the legalization of medical marijuana since the last legislative session to this summer at Mensa’s Annual Gathering where he cleared the smoke and myths surrounding marijuana. Friday he filed a bill rolling medical and recreational use in one big hit.

Clark filed the “Cannabis Freedom Act” which would regulate the use of cannabis just as the state regulates alcohol.

Touting the benefit of pot over pills and curbing opioid addiction for patients who use marijuana to overcome pain and problems from illness like multiple sclerosis, Clark has talked extensively in the Senate and legislative committees about the benefits and regulation of marijuana.

After the Mensa event this summer, Clark had told The State Journal he wanted to have a meaningful conversation about the senseless prohibition of the plant, which Clark said, has been financially backed by alcohol and tobacco companies blocking the legislation in other states.

The “Cannabis Freedom Act” would end the prohibition on marijuana cultivation, possession and selling the substance in regulatory framework similar to Colorado.

Quick takeaways on the act include: it would only be available to residents 21 and over;

• residents could possess up to 1 ounce on their person;

•cultivate up to 5 plants;

• store an excess of cultivated cannabis for personal use where it was cultivated or transfer 1 ounce to another person 21 or older without remuneration.

• persons under 21 could possess cannabis if it was recommended by a licensed physician;

• no smoking cannabis in public places

Other parts of the regulator framework would include only residents 21 and over could enter a retail facility for the purchase of cannabis or related products.

Clark’s bill would maximize unlawful possession at $250 and a $500 fine for illegal growing marijuana on a property without the property owner’s permission.

“It is abundantly clear to me that cannabis, while being much less harmful, should be treated the same as alcohol,” Clark said in a release. “The Cannabis Freedom Act is an outline on how to tax and regulate the sale of marijuana to adults 21 and older in Kentucky. It is time for this discussion in our Commonwealth.”

The act’s regulatory framework has a three-tier licensing system which separates cannabis cultivators, processors and retailers independently to “prevent monopolization and vertical integration,” a component different from the framework proposed in Ohio.

Clark said the tax revenues would be in a restricted fund to increase SEEK funding for the state’s public schools and provide scholarships to Kentucky students who qualify for needs-based  assistance to both public and post-secondary schools in Kentucky.

Revenues would also help fund evidence-based substance abuse treatment programs, provide grants to local law enforcement agencies to purchase protective equipment and provide additional revenue to the state’s general fund.

During the 30-day short session, Clark brought up the medicinal studies and medical benefits of cannabis almost every day in the Senate.

Follow political reporter Brad Bowman at @bradleybowman for all state government and political news.

CONTINUE READING…

Red Vanwinkle explains why we must regulate cannabis like alcohol in kentucky


 

December 12, 2015

Good morning everybody!

Will you help me?

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Above: Patient in Illinois tends to a plant in 2010.

Today I will be sharing a story that only a handful of people knows about. Some know just enough, that I have been asked many times over the years to share publicly. I haven’t done so, because it could be seen as a weakness. So here goes, and it’s 100% true. As some of my longtime friends know.

It all started with extreme bloating. Eventually my belly got so big, I was about a 40 waist, but was drastically loosing weight. I was getting weaker everyday.

After some time, I had a bunch of symptoms hitting me. Some scary stuff. Like pain all over in my joints. Eyes so dry in the mornings, I would open them real slow, as to not rip my eyes. I was getting weak as a kitten, and bed ridden some days.

Then I started to get mind fog. So bad so, I got lost driving in Monticello KY. Which I know the place very well, and has only about 3 stop lights. I then my eyes started to change colors. Then my skin started to change colors. I started turning yellow. I was not able to get out of bed much at this point. I knew this was something that might kill me. I seen my family cry, and very afraid of their future. Which was hard for a man to swallow.

During this time we lived off the grid. Not much money at all. I cut and sold firewood, some crops, and a little homemade drink. Certainly not enough money to have doctors and hospitals find out what was wrong. With me being too week to cut and split much wood. We had less wood to sell. So we had less money.

I had started trying to get my affairs in order. But I was not giving up. I went into town (Monticello) almost everyday. I went to the library to do research online. Which is how I was getting lost, being by myself. But it wasn’t a major problem, just drive around for a minute, and I would be back on my road heading home.

Spelling simple 3 and 4 letter words, was becoming a major issue in my research. But I swallowed my pride, and started asking people how to spell words, when I ran into the issue. I know this sounds simple enough. But it is a hard task to ask someone how to spell "was". People think you’re mentally handicapped, completely uneducated, or on dope. Which during this time, I was not doing anything. No drinking, no pot, no over the counter pain meds, or anything I thought could place strain on my liver.

I had actually stopped smoking pot before I got sick. I stopped smoking cigarettes during that time too. And I rarely ever drink. When I do drink, I don’t drink much. I did when I was really young. But as I got older, the after effects got worse (hangover). So I quit that business long ago lol.

The mind fog continued to get worse, as I became more yellow in color. I had gotten to the point I was having a hard time remembering how to say some words. Conversation was becoming a difficult task.
There was several more symptoms. Too many to go into detail here, and that some I would rather not share. I got to where almost everything I ate caused me some type of issue. Which drove the wife nuts trying to see I was able to eat.

It got so bad, that my wife came to me crying, saying she can’t watch me die. I told her I was getting better. That it was just going to take time to show on the outside. Yes, a little white lie at the time. But I figured well placed. I soon after started being a jerk, so she would leave me. I had come to the conclusion. That if this killed me. I was going to die on my terms, and alone. As I did not want this burden on anyone else. Yet she didn’t go anywhere.

Yet, I was still not just going to give up. In my research. I knew my liver was shutting down. So I started buying different liver supporting substances. Like a vitamin called liver aid, milk thistle. I bought B12 to help increase energy. I bought acidophilus to help incase I had cancer. Which many signs was pointing at that. And I had recently had a close relative die from liver cancer. There was other various health items too, but the listed ones was my go to meds.

All this stuff was not cheap in the stores. But I knew I had to have it. I needed it to keep me going, so I could find out what was wrong with me. Luckily there was a salvage store in Pine Knot. This store on one day a week had all kinds of vitamins for cheap. They had boxes, and boxes of different vitamins, and over the counter meds. The wife and I would search through all those boxes for a bottle here and there. Most of the time, we would find enough to get me through the week. Which they had new stuff every week. So this became a weekly thing, of a couple hours. There was times we found extras, so I would buy all I could. I would even count change just to get as many of the found extras as we could. Hated to leave any bottles, as I knew I would sometime or another need them, and not have them. There was some weeks we didn’t find what I needed. So I would bum some from friends that had alcohol related liver issues. Just to make it to the next week. Good friends are worth more than gold to me!!!
So back to figuring out what was wrong. I had symptoms that matched cancer, and about 100 different rare genetic disorders. Genetic disorders are not contagious, it’s something a person is either born with or not. But could be dormant for years before coming to cause issues.

So there I was. I had either a possibility of various cancers, or a genetic disorder. Which most of these things I found was calling for a prognosis of death, with varying expected times. But there was hope. I had started eating super healthy, and taking my vitamins/meds. I was seeing improvement with my liver situation. The situation went from all bad, to sometimes improvement. While other times not. Which was also kinda scary, as this type improvements with these things, is also likely with liver cancer. But basically a little time buying. Either way, I was taking what I could get, and happy to have it. As the steady decline was even more scary. As the scariest thing was leaving my family without. This I had to fix!

With the small improvements, and the energy increase from eating lots of sublingual B12 tablets a few times a day. I was able to do more. Sublingual tablets absorb inside your mouth. So almost instant energy.

I started looking at getting back closer to her family. We logged the property, and bought a foreclosure. We got the home at a amazing price. The asking price was so low, we knew others would also be putting in offers. So I offered them $1200 more than asking price, and we got it. We was flat broke no furniture. An extension cord running from our new neighbors lol. But we had the house, and food in our belles. Which was completion of phase one. Make sure the family had enough to be ok when I left.

This new home needed all kinds of work, and still needs some. But it has awesome bones. Multi colored brick, new metal roof, a two car garage, and fenced in yard on an acre. This new home was out in the country. Yet a 15 minute drive to Elizabethtown KY. Which is very close to Fort Know KY.

The jobs was available here. I had no problem in getting jobs. Matter of fact, I got 3 as soon as I went looking. I applied for jobs I thought I could handle. Which I decided I was going to take them all. I felt like superman changing cloths on the fly lol.

One of the jobs was an advertising associate. Which I did sales, and mostly at my convenience. Which was easy enough. Just had to get some fancy duds, and a hair cut. I didn’t make a killing, but did ok.
The next job was a pizza delivery driver a few hours a day. Which again was easy enough. I just needed a gps tell me where to go. So I got one, and the job was a piece of cake. I made a sorry paycheck, but made good in tips.

The 3rd job was kind of tougher. Yet I still felt it was doable. I applied at a factory delivering parts to the different lines. Which I had a cart that I drove around. This one proved to be a bit more difficult. I had no gps to tell me where to go, and I would get turned around from time to time. Which I just applied my previous way of dealing with such. I drove until I figured out where I was lol. Most thought I was just having fun, so I played along. I would Aihooooo, and toot the horn as I would fly by hahahaha. This job was also long hours, and 7 day a week most weeks. So I was having a hard time doing so much. Yet I was making the most of my money on this job. Most, but not all my money. So I just needed something to bring in a few more bucks.

I quit the factory job, and started my handyman service. I had to act as if the client needed something major. I was not the best qualified to do the task. As really I was not able to do a lot physically, even though I had all the knowledge to compete almost any home repair. I just didn’t want to let be known, I was not physically able to do some task. I remember in the beginning. I was doing a painting job, and started to give out on a ladder. I told the home owner, the heavy onion smell, from something they was cooking was causing me issue, and I needed a break for fresh air. Which was likely true, as onions was one of the things that started making me sick if I ate them. Which the homeowner quickly aired out the home, while I was getting some fresh air. I also ate several b12 tablets. Which I was able to continue on.

As business increased, I was able to add the family. Which they worked hard, and we was as efficient as any small construction crew. I have several awesome short cuts, that makes things faster, and easier, with the same quality results (Work smarter, not harder).

You know I am not in such a condition now. So how, and when did I change things around. I was spending every spare moment researching medical conditions. We had wifi at our new place. Which made research a lot more convenient. I was doing lots of research on auto immune disorders(genetic disorder). Because I had seen in my research. Autoimmune disorders can have greatly varying symptoms. Which makes it difficult for medical professionals to track down. This also causes wrong diagnoses many times.

As I researched Autoimmune disorders. I learned that they can stay dormant in a person for many years, or never come about even if the person has the genetics to develop a Autoimmune disorder. That this can be triggered by several things. One of those things is surgery. Which just before my issues started, I had all my teeth pulled. Because I had bad teeth, due to a genetic disorder. Where I had no natural enamel coating on my teeth. So bells was going off, for me to concentrate my research here. I tested gluten, and gluten was a factor in the bely bloating, and pain. So I stopped gluten. With some results but still some things got worse. Which caused me to realize I could be affected by multiple genetic disorders.

I had been researching everything I could. Other medical practices in other places, and there findings, and treatments. Then somehow in my search I was reading some comments to a blog. One that said the US health department held a patent on cannabinoids having positive effects on Autoimmune disorders. So I copied, and pasted a search. Because at that time I didn’t know what cannabinoids was. As many people still don’t know what it is.
Sure enough, the US health department has this documented, and patented. This along with having positive effects in treating cancer. At this point, I am in shock that this is not know by the public. There has to be a reason. Because when I do searches on autoimmune, and cancer. There was thousands of different kinds of claims to be of benefit. But during that time, there was nothing unless you did a direct search for cannabinoids and cancer, or Cannabinoids and Autoimmune. I found the reason this was not very well known.

You know where cannabinoids are found? CANNABIS!!! Both hemp, and Marijuana has them.

Now I was starting to see another link. About the same time I quit consuming Cannabis, was about the same time I started getting sick. Could it be Cannabis was helping prevent autoimmune from developing? As I did my research, I found this to be very possible.

Here I was, had not consumed Cannabis for years. Didn’t really want to spend the money to get it. Takes time to grow. So I had to think long and hard. First I talked with my wife and son. I told them, and showed them what I had found. I asked them what they thought about me trying this to get better. They both looked at me like I was stupid. Not because it would be shameful. Because they didn’t care if I had to eat horse poop to get better. So with them it was a definite wanting me to give it a try.

Next I went and talked with my inlaws. As they have always been against any drugs, drinking, and even smoking. I rarely ever even smoke around them still today. Father inlaw was acting like he was ok, but I really didn’t know. Mother inlaw was acting tolerant as she knew I was sick. But was skeptical about any possible improvements.
The next input I went to seek was my friends. Which I even actually made a post. Back then, about 30 friends was all I had on my friends list lol. If the person was not an actual friend, they was not on my list in those days. Those post has since been deleted. As I deleted all post when I did my first TV show. All my friends that knew I was sick, and the ones just finding out I was sick, everyone said go for it.

Once I decided to go for it. Then I needed to figure out where to get it at a price I could afford. Lets just say I have many friends. Which has helped me. Even if I don’t have any money. If I am having issues. They take care of me best they can.

But even with knowing the right people, it was a gamble. As jail was no place for a person as sick as I was. Even now, a long sit in jail, could possibly cause a relapse. So another issue that needs to be fixed. Hence I started publicly supporting Cannabis reform in KY. Because I really don’t want to have to leave my home for safe access to what I need.

I started out as a hemp, and medical marijuana advocate. But once I started gaining notoriety, I started to learn Medical only in KY, would only be a money making sham. One the common person could not afford. I know this, as I was offered an in on this money making plan. I then seen this would be for the wealthy only. I seen this would create a group to fight further Cannabis reform. Such as a group of people whom would not be making as much, if full regulated came about. I was not selling out, while the common people suffer. Even if this would fix my situation. So now I advocate for Cannabis to be regulated like alcohol.

But before I did. I looked at all angles. When you look at Cannabis verses alcohol. It is clear that Cannabis is safer, less addictive, and pose fewer issues for a community than alcohol. I seen the fact alcohol is harder for teens to get than Marijuana. This is because street dealers don’t ask for ID. So with regulations like alcohol has. Cannabis would be harder for teens to obtain. So I seen no adverse reason that out weighed the good of regulating Cannabis like alcohol.
I seen the economic boost. I seen the decrease in consumption of heroin, and prescription pain pills.

I saw KY being a leading economy in the US. As KY grew 98% of the hemp for WWII. This is because KY has the best overall U.S. environment to grow Cannabis.

To bring this full circle. My mother inlaw would fire into anyone that says I shouldn’t consume Cannabis. She has went to Cannabis reform meetings. She has prepared food for Cannabis reform events. She has attended Cannastock. She has had discussions with her friends. She has helped me anyway she can. To help me help KY bring Cannabis reform to KY.  I have autoimmune disorder. It’s genetic, and Cannabis turns off the illness for me, and many other people.

Even though I didn’t really want to share. I did so in hopes of gaining as much help as possible.

Will you help me bring Cannabis reform to KY?

Would you want to face jail every time you need a prescription filled?

That is my world. Even though I don’t act like it bothers me, it DOES!
It’s not fair. It’s not fair people get pain meds they don’t really need, while I can’t get safe access to what I need. It’s not fair Sudafed is legal, and is what meth is made from. Because people how have a runny nose needs it. So they say the risk is worth it. Meanwhile heck no for Marijuana. Reason, someone will get high. Even though the high from marijuana has NEVER killed 1 person with overdose.

Here are some things you can do, if you you would like to help me.
You can call your KY legislators and ask them to support the new measure to regulate Cannabis in KY like alcohol. The number is (800) 372-7181.

You can tell pass this information on to any Kentuckian you know. And encourage them to make the call as well.

You can email your legislators asking them to support the new measure to regulate cannabis like alcohol.

There will be more you can get involved with. Just be watching as I will be posting various things to help bring this reform to KY.

You are welcome to share this post.

As always, thank you for your continued Cannabis support ,’-) Aihooooo

Written by:  Red Vanwinkle, Kentucky.

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