Tag Archives: Chris Conrad

Is there an ecumenically-based religious creed common to a significant number of cannabis-based theologies?


 

 

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By Chris Conrad / ORIGINAL HERE / (posted approx. 9 years ago)

Cantheism Note: This treatise is not intended to advocate the breaking of any law. An academic treatise by Chris Conrad, which addresses the question: Is there an ecumenically-based religious creed common to a significant number of cannabis-based theologies, that can be articulated and offered as a formal petition to Congress for redress of grievances to protect religious use of cannabis under the First Amendment to the Constitution of the United States of America?

We hold that a universal set of principles and practices does exist that meets the above qualifications. Based on the following principles, do assert that adherence to the religious use of marijuana should be recognized and protected under the First Amendment and provided equal protection of the law under the 14th Amendment. We invite your comments and suggestions. — Definitions: Cantheism (1997), derived from Kantheism (1996 fr. Greek: kannabis + theism). A mystical religion based on the inherent goodness of the Cannabis plant. Adherents: Cantheists, Cannabists

Cantheist Creed I believe that Cannabis sativa, L. is the useful cane and the true hemp. I believe that Cannabis Hemp is a restorative natural resource for all humanity to grow, share, and use for our fundamental needs.
Therefore, I shall honor its existance. I believe that the Cannabis plant is endowed with important healing powers, some of which cannot yet be explained.
Therefore I shall offer it to ease the suffering of others. I recognize cannabis as a sacrament within my community. Therefore I shall receive it with thanksgiving and deep respect for its resinous powers. The cultivation and disemination of cannabis are honorable professions. Therefore I shall act with absolute integrity and honesty* to protect the Cantheist community and its values. * Note: The Christian Bible states that “the truth shall set ye free” and “render unto Caesar the things that are Caesar’s and to God the things that are God’s”, therefore a Cantheist cannot lie or perjur themselves in a court of law because it violates both “the truth” and “the things that are Caesar’s”, namely the courts. Cantheology: Philosophical roots Cantheism neither endorses nor discriminates against any other church, faith, or system of belief. Anyone may incorporate Cantheism into their current religious persuasion, so long as they adhere to the Creed. Many of the world’s great religions have used Cannabis sacramentally and ceremonially, including but not limited to: Animism: Belief that all things have sentient spirits, and some versions assert that Cannabis has the power to cross the line between the mental and the spiritual worlds. Popular in Africa and pre-Columbian America. See the parable of the rope, below. Biblical Judeo-Christian-Moslem religions, including Coptic Christianity and Rastafari: Genesis 1:29-31; Ezekiel 34:29; Isaiah 18:4-5; Rev. 22:1-2. Sacred spliff. Egyptians: Smoke Eaters at the Temple at Thebes, incense, mortality rituals. Hinduism: Sadhu, ganja, chillum, spiritual and physical healing, smoking cloth. Includes the mystical interpretation of Cannabis healing powers via Ayurvedic practices. Pygmy and other African religions: Mound smokers, animism, the spirit of plants and nature, the breath of the gods. Scythianism: Smoking huts, hemp labor, cannabis purification rituals. Shamanism: Use of all herbs in mystical pursuit of the infinite. Sufi Moslems: Use cannabis to reach an ecstatic state. Zoroastrianism: Use cannabis to communicate with god on high for mystical consciousness and personal enlightenment. Cannabis Hemp: The rope that linked mankind to God African creation myths explain why God, who once lived close to humankind, has removed himself from their world.  Most of these myths describe a golden age when there was no separation between humans and their creator.  However, something occurred to alienate God.  The Mende say that God withdrew into the heavens because humans continually begged benefits from him.  Ashanti mythology tells of God’s retreat into the heavens after a woman hit him with her pestle while pounding traditional food.  Myths from the upper White Nile area speak of the relationship between God and man being severed when a rope between heaven and earth was accidentally cut (Mbiti, John S. 1969. African Religions and Philosophy. London: Heinemann, p 97; Mitchell, Robert Cameron. 1977. African Primal Religions. Niles, IL: Argus Communications. p, 25).   Cantheist Rites, Rituals and Ceremonies Observance of Cantheist rites are beneficial but not mandatory. The extent of one’s participation is a measure of the depth of one’s devotion. Practice cannabism, the regular consumption of cannabis. Make oblation with the hempseed, and sow it everywhere. Offer thanksgiving and blessing for cannabis when you partake. Share the holy smoke among the faithful. Use a hempen prayer cloth to inhale through when sharing the holy smoke among the community. First passage of cannabis at age 16: Parents may choose to offer cannabis, child may pass on this opportunity. Age of personal consent at 18: Adult steps forward and accepts Cantheism and shares in the sacrament. Summer solstice: Bonfire jumping. Undertake cannabinges, periods of intense consumption of cannabis. Freedom pilgrimage: Take the sacrament in a land that it is free from oppression at least once in your life, and remember the years of persecution.

Cantheist Symbology The graphic symbol for Cantheism is modeled after the ancient Egyptian hieroglyph for hemp rope, which was transformed into the letter “h”. Illustration: Detail from an Egyptian stella (1780-1306 BC), Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Firenze (Italy) Room III, case 14, Item 7611 The hand symbol for Cantheism is right hand cupped around the left, with two fingers extended in the inner hand, symbolizing the male and the female plants. The overall hand gesture signifying the female calyx which holds the trichome glands. Astronomy: The three stars of Orion’s belt represent the three aspects of cannabis: Commerce, medicine, and spirit. Sirius, the brightest star in the nearby constellation Canis Major (Big Dog) symbolizes cannabis in the Northern winter sky. Cantheist Code I will share my faith, but not be obnoxious about it. We pray for our oppressors, and work for a better world.

CONTINUE READING…

 

http://www.care2.com/c2c/group/Cantheism

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The hemp industries association; lawrence serbin, president, introduces himself…


Hello everyone!

On October 14, 2015 the new board of directors for the Hemp Industries Association had their first board meeting and elected me, Lawrence Serbin to be the new president. Our previous president, Anndrea Hermann will continue to serve on the board of directors.

I would first like to applaud Anndrea Hermann for all the work she has done over the years with the HIA as well as all the great work she has accomplished for the hemp industry as a whole. It will be a challenge to follow in her footsteps.

Many people know me in the industry, but for those who do not, I would like to provide an introduction.

I first got involved with hemp 25 year ago in 1990, right after I graduated from college. I had been contemplating what to do with my life and wasn’t sure which industry I should pursue. I knew I wanted to start a company and felt I should do something which would help the planet. One morning I awoke and it hit me like a ton of bricks. I would start an environment hemp company to promote and sell hemp products.

It was not easy at first because at that time, there were no hemp companies in existence. I bought a copy of the "Emperor Wears No Clothes" and began to do my research. From that book, I got to know Chris Conrad of the Business Alliance for Commerce in Hemp (BACH) where I volunteered to help out. I also met Jack Herer the author of the Emperor Wears No Clothes. Within 6 months of volunteering, Chris Conrad moved to Europe to write his own hemp book, and I became the national director in his place. I ran BACH for about a year and a half from early 1991-to late 1992. I left BACH to start my own business in 1994. I formed Hemp Traders, specializing in selling hemp textiles. During the next 22 years, my business slowly grew and my company is now the largest supplier of hemp textiles, twine, yarn, rope and fiber in the United States.

I joined the HIA in 1995 and have always been a member. I served as an early Fiber and Fabric committee leader, and around 5-6 years ago I was elected to the board of directors and became the secretary and vice president.

There have been so many changes in the hemp industry over the years. From the beginning, hemp enthusiasts constantly had to endure the jokes about smoking our products. People were constantly inferring the only reason we supported industrial hemp was because we wanted to legalize marijuana. The early days were mostly about educating the public on the difference between hemp and marijuana and the benefits of industrial hemp.

But it has been a long and frustrating process. We did see some early advances with a number of western European countries legalizing industrial hemp in the mid to late nineties and Canada legalizing industrial hemp in 1998. But nothing seemed to change for industrial hemp in the United States. Even when a number of states began legalizing medical marijuana during the next decade, the status of industrial hemp stayed the same. A few states did legalize industrial hemp, but without federal approval, viable seeds could not be imported and practically nothing was grown.

But things finally began to change with Colorado legalizing industrial hemp in 2012. The U.S. Congress included a provision in the Agricultural Act of 2014 that allowed colleges and state agencies to grow and conduct research on hemp in states where it is legal. 2015 has seen the first viable industrial hemp crops grown for commercial and research purposes, with Colorado and Kentucky taking the lead.

So what is happening with the HIA and what is the status of hemp? In my next article I will discuss the exact measure the HIA will be taking to promote hemp and empower our members and state chapters. In the meantime, I would like to provide a parable.

Imagine there is a farmer who has magical seeds. The farmer knows these seeds are special and represent tremendous possibilities. These seeds hold the potential to provide food, clothing, shelter, and medicine for all humanity. The farmer talks about the magical seeds to the neighbors who are also stewards of the land. Some listen intently but others dismiss his claims. They don’t quite seem to believe what the farmer is telling them. They want to see proof.

But something is wrong with the land and the seeds will not grow. Year after year the farmer plants the seeds, and year after year they fail to germinate or are eaten by birds. The neighboring farmers shrug their shoulders and shake their heads. After many years the farmer feels frustrated and even contemplates giving up.

Then one spring morning the farmer notices something has changed in the air. The wind is blowing from a different direction and the soil seems more fertile. There is a feeling of positive energy all around the land. So the farmer decides to give it one more try. He takes his magical seeds and scatters them across his fields. At first, nothing seems to be happening, but after a couple of weeks the farmer notices a few sprouts have appeared. Not all the land is fertile, but in a few fields, the green leaves of his miraculous plants have begun to grow. The farmer does not get discouraged because the plants are only growing in some areas, nor does he feel impatient because the plants are not fully grown. The farmer is thrilled because he realizes this is the beginning of something tremendous.

Even with some of the plants now growing, the farmer understands the work is just beginning. With new vigor, the farmer sets out to cultivate the plants which have developed. He also continues to plant in the areas of his fields which did not sprout. For the farmer knows these areas will eventually become ripe for growing.

It is the spirit of the farmer’s new vigor that the HIA should to emulate. Hemp in America is just starting to sprout, but there is a lot of work which needs to be accomplished to bring our industry to harvest. Don’t be discouraged or impatient if things seem to be moving too slowly. Hemp plants grow on their own time and only need to be nurtured.

Over the years I have been told certain things about hemp were impossible. It would be impossible for hemp to be legalized. It would be impossible to get seeds. It would be impossible to make fine textiles, it would be impossible to build a house. It would be impossible to make paper. When I hear these things I just smile, for I know todays impossibilities are tomorrows realities. There are miracles happening everywhere with hemp. All it takes is love, imagination, and application.

Membership in the HIA has doubled during the past year, and our annual conference was the biggest and best ever. We expect more states to legalize industrial hemp and lots more acreage to be planted next spring and in the years to come.

I look forward to working with all hemp entrepreneurs, enthusiasts, students, and farmers during the next year. I am always available for business advise and will be happy to listen to your questions and plans for hemp. I am most easily reached by email.

Be blessed.

Lawrence Serbin

Board President

Hemp Industries Association

President

Hemp Traders

About the Hemp Industries Association

The Hemp Industries Association (HIA) represents the interests of the hemp industry and encourages the research and development of new products made from industrial hemp, oilseed and fiber varieties of Cannabis. To learn more about the HIA and the benefits of membership, visit our web site at: http://www.TheHIA.org