Tag Archives: epilepsy

Medical Marijuana, Inc.’s CBD Oil RSHO-X™ Garners National News Headlines Across Mexico For Significantly Reducing Seizures Of Epileptic Children


Articles Focus On RSHO-X™ Study Conducted on Severe Epileptic Children By Mexican Neurologist Who Reported Elimination in Seizures in 17% of Cases and Reduction of Motor Seizures in 84% of Cases

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Medical Marijuana, Inc.

Mar 17, 2017, 09:00 ET

 


SAN DIEGO, March 17, 2017 /PRNewswire/Medical Marijuana, Inc. (OTC: MJNA), the first-ever publicly traded cannabis company in the United States, announced today that its subsidiary HempMeds® Mexico garnered national news headlines across Mexico for the positive results of a recent study conducted by renowned Mexican physician Dr. Saul Garza Morales on the effects of its RSHO-X™ product in treating children with severe epilepsy. HempMeds® Mexico was the first company to receive government import permits for its cannabidiol (CBD) oil product Real Scientific Hemp Oil-X™ (RSHO-X™) via the Mexican Health Department COFEPRIS.

An article from Mexico newspaper Reforma, “Ayuda cannabidiol a 84% de pacientes,” or “Cannabidiol helps 84% of patients,” explained how 84 percent of children with epilepsy treated with RSHO-X™ halved the number of seizures they suffer from, according to this first clinical study on the use of cannabis in patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome in Mexico.   

“We are proud that our cannabidiol (CBD) hemp oil product, without THC, has enabled 17% of patients in the study to experience 100 percent relief from their seizures, the best results of any product/medication in the world regarding the reduction of seizures in Lennox-Gastaut patients,” said Medical Marijuana, Inc. CEO Dr. Stuart Titus. “It is exciting to see such widespread news coverage of these study results by the Mexico media, as studies that prove the therapeutic benefits of CBD like Dr. Garza’s study will continue to help fuel less restrictive medical cannabis programs not only in Mexico, but across the globe. In addition, as news spreads of this revolutionary treatment for diseases such as epilepsy, more patients and families that suffer from debilitating medical conditions will receive help with medical marijuana.”

The study included 39 patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, a severe form of pediatric epilepsy that typically develops before the age of 4. Of those 39 patients, who took up to 5-7mg CBD/kg progressive doses of RSHO-X™ 5000MG, 84% experienced a 50% or greater reduction in motor seizures; 53% reported better than a 75% reduction in seizures; and seven reported a complete elimination of all seizures (17%) over a four-month period, with zero reported side effects.

Results of this study are set to be published in the near future. To view the study, click here.

Other major national Mexico outlets that have reported the results of Dr. Garza’s epilepsy study with RSHO-X™ include:  

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Health care refugees: Medical marijuana and new hope


By Elizabeth Cohen, CNN Senior Medical Correspondent
Video produced by John Bonifield, CNN

Updated 12:16 PM ET, Mon November 28, 2016

Paramedics transport Abby Muszynski to the air ambulance that will fly her from Florida to Colorado.

 

This is the second part of a series on health care refugees. Read the first part here.

(CNN)Rich and Kim Muszynski know when their 5-year-old daughter, Abby, is about to have a grand mal seizure because her pupils enlarge, and she’ll seem to fixate at something in the distance that only she can see.

Then it starts. Abby’s extremities shake. She gasps for air.

By the time she turned 3, Abby had tried about eight different anti-seizure medications. None of them worked very well. Panicked to see their daughter getting worse and worse, the Muszynskis drove three hours to Orlando to see Dr. Ngoc Minh Le, a board certified pediatric neurologist and epileptologist.

Le told them that chances of another anti-seizure drug working on Abby were tiny. He recommended medical marijuana. The timing was right: Just months before, Gov. Rick Scott had legalized the use of a type of non-euphoric cannabis called Charlotte’s Web.

The formulation had been a miracle for a little girl with epilepsy named Charlotte Figi. The Muszynskis had seen her story on Dr. Sanjay Gupta’s CNN documentary “Weed.”

Charlotte’s Web did help Abby, but not as much as it had helped Charlotte. She still was having about two grand mal seizures a week, each lasting about eight to 10 minutes.

Le explained to Kim and Rich that Charlotte’s Web has only tiny amounts of THC, one of the psychoactive ingredients in marijuana. Medical marijuana with higher levels of THC was Abby’s best hope, he told them.

But at this point, in 2015, high-THC marijuana wasn’t legal in Florida for Abby. To get it, the Muszynskis would have to move, leaving behind their friends and family, including two older children.

    Kim thought about Colorado, where Charlotte Figi lived. She’d checked with parents of disabled children there, and they told her the state had a fair and efficient Medicaid program.

    Getting to Colorado would be a challenge: Abby’s doctors said it wasn’t safe for her to fly on a commercial plane or to take a long car ride across the country.

    The Muszynskis began their final fight with Florida Medicaid — one that would leave Kim and Abby homeless for several days.

    Kim says that in mid-August, she started talking to Medicaid officials about getting an air ambulance to Colorado. On September 19, Rich drove the family car out to Colorado. They planned for Kim to attend the closing on their house in Boynton Beach on September 23 and leave on the air ambulance with Abby that afternoon.

    Kim had emailed and spoken with various Florida officials, and it seemed to her that everything was in order. “Please give a call today so we can finalize travel arrangements!” Mary Joyce, a senior registered nurse supervisor at Children’s Medical Services at the Florida Department of Health, wrote in an email to Kim on September 20.

    But then several days passed, and there was still no final approval for the transport.

    Their house sold, Kim and Abby were homeless. They moved in with Kim’s best friend and her husband. All of Abby’s equipment, like her bed with guardrails, was with Rich on their way to Colorado. Kim slept with Abby on the floor.

    Abby’s cries at night kept Kim’s friends awake. Kim wrote emails begging Florida officials for help. But for the first time, she added someone not previously included on the email: this CNN reporter.

    Three days later, she learned that the transport had been approved.

      A spokeswoman for Florida’s Agency for Health Care Administration gave this statement:

      In this case relocation services are not covered by Medicaid, per federal Medicaid guidelines. However, thanks to Safety Net funds made available by Governor Scott and the Legislature, the state supported this family by covering the costs to provide relocation services via the air ambulance of the mother’s choice. Working with the family, the state arranged transport as quickly as possible,” wrote the spokeswoman, Mallory McManus.

      CONTINUE READING STORY HERE!

      CENSORSHIP: THE 1947 MEDICAL CANNABIS STUDY COVERUP


      By Erin Elizabeth

      June 24, 2016

      Government Censorship

       

      (Editor’s note: The Antique Cannabis Book is a free resource on the internet and houses “over  600 2,000 Pre-1937 Medical Cannabis Products Documented;—a Great Resource book for the Antique Cannabis Collector”. But don’t think of it just as a picture book, it’s also an amazing resource. It would take me too long to paraphrase all the info on this particular topic so I’ll present it to you here. Yes, it’s long, but it’s worth the read. Enjoy. XO- Erin)

      This section of the Antique Cannabis Book, was meant primarily as a tool for active News Media Reporters who needed a quick (yet well documented) source of information on the subject of Governmental Censorship as it relates to Medical Cannabis. As such this (1947) study, which was openly published and never actually under the threat of censorship, would normally not qualify for inclusion.

      However, a quick look beneath the surface shows a different story. One that reveals, wheels within wheels, circles within circles, all spinning around . . . . let’s just say that this study, came very close to (ah, how shall we put it), going the way of oh so many other Medical Cannabis studies.

      The author is convinced that had Anslinger (or anyone at the D.E.A.) known about the study BEFORE IT WAS PUBLISHED , it most assuredly would have been CENSORED.   Either that or (doing what the Narc’s do now), killed it in its cradle by simply denying the researchers the needed licenses and permits.

      This one however, seems to have slipped though the cracks. Here let us go over the facts (those we’ve been able to locate), and let the reader to decide.

      1.1 – STUDY SUMMARY
      The following, located via 420 Magazine [1] Cannabis Works. ”

      Anti-Epileptic Action Of Marijuana-Active Substances BY JEAN P. DAVIS, M.D., and H.H. RAMSEY, M.D. [2]

       

      PLEASE CONTINUE READING THROUGH THIS LINK!

      ANTIQUE CANNABIS BOOK ONLINE

      Epileptic mom who used marijuana raising funds to fight charges


      Hidden blood tests by hospitals put mothers at risk of arrest  Alabama hospitals have less-than-clear intentions as drug tests lead to arrests of pregnant moms

      Will Bishop has suffered no health effects from his mother’s self medication of her epilepsy with marijuana while she carried him. (Grant Blankenship)

      By Amy Yurkanin | ayurkanin@al.com
      Email the author | Follow on Twitter
      on November 30, 2015 at 4:37 PM

      The family of a young Russell County woman facing up to ten years in prison after using marijuana to treat seizures while pregnant has started a crowdfunding campaign to raise funds for her criminal defense.

      Katie Darovitz shared her story with ProPublica and Al.com earlier this year. The 25-year-old suffers from epilepsy so severe that she can’t drive safely or hold a job. When she found out she was pregnant, she went off her anti-epilepsy drugs – which have been linked to birth defects – and began using marijuana to prevent seizures.

      She was arrested a couple weeks after the December 2014 birth of her son because they both tested positive for marijuana. Alabama is one of a handful of states where mothers can be prosecuted for exposing an unborn child to illicit drugs under the state’s chemical endangerment of a child law.

      In an analysis of almost 500 criminal cases, Al.com and ProPublica discovered that marijuana was the drug most commonly cited in indictments and arrest reports for women arrested for drug use during pregnancy. Darovitz faces several years in prison if convicted.

      Advocates for the family have located two out-of-state attorneys to work on Darovitz’s criminal and child custody cases, but they need a local attorney to assist. The out-of-state attorneys are working for free, but the family must still raise money to pay for travel and other expenses.

      The family is seeking up to $15,000 to pay for legal expenses and has started a GoFundMe campaign.

      Darovitz’s mother-in-law, Debi Word, has reached out to local attorneys. At least one attorney did not want to take the case to trial and urged Darovitz to take a plea deal. But that deal would saddle Darovitz with substantial monthly court fees, Word said.

      "This is such an injustice," Word said. "And I can’t imagine her going to prison for trying to protect her baby."

      The case has already taken a toll of Darovitz’s health, Word said. Stress has caused her seizures to intensify, and marijuana is the only treatment that is keeping them under control, Word said. If Darovitz entered a drug treatment court, she wouldn’t be able to use marijuana to treat seizures because medical marijuana is not legal in Alabama.

      Darovitz has struggled with anxiety and depression throughout her legal ordeal. Although she faces up to ten years if convicted, the family believes a jury will not convict if they hear Darovitz’s story. Expert witnesses who have researched the use of marijuana during pregnancy have also agreed to testify. Studies of children exposed to marijuana in utero have produced mixed results, with some showing no effects on development and others suggesting some increase in attention deficit and hyperactivity disorders.

      "This has been very stressful and I hope it just goes away, because all I was doing was trying to protect my son and keep myself alive," Darovtiz said. "And I really hope I can see my son’s first birthday."

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      One night in 1839….


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      One night in 1839, a woman knocked at the door of a British Army doctor named William O’Shaughnessy who was stationed in India.

      The woman’s infant was having seizures and needed help. The doctor tried several 19th-century remedies, including opium and leeches, but the convulsions grew worse over several days until the baby stopped eating and was convulsing almost constantly.

      Not knowing what else to do, the doctor tried hemp, which the locals used as medicine.
      A few drops of a cannabis tincture under the child’s tongue stopped the seizures almost immediately. Regular doses over the next few weeks brought the convulsions to an end.
      "The child is now in enjoyment of robust health and regained her natural plump and happy appearance," O’Shaughnessy later wrote in a medical journal article, titled "On the preparation of Indian Hemp or Gunjah."
      He concluded that, "In Hemp the profession has gained an anti-convulsive remedy of the greatest value."
      When a few Colorado Springs families started treating their epileptic children with marijuana oil in 2012, the treatment was unknown to the modern medical establishment and the parents thought they were making the discovery for the first time. In fact, they were uncovering once widespread knowledge that had been lost or ignored during the decades-long nearly global prohibition against using marijuana as medicine.

      Historical documents show that people have known for centuries that cannabis could quell seizures. In modern times, scientific studies have repeatedly shown its potential as treatment for epilepsy. But a combination of restrictive drug laws, stigma in the medical establishment and lack of funding for research caused findings to be stifled or dismissed for decades, cannabis researchers say.
      The potential human cost of ignoring the evidence for so long is hard to overstate. Of the 3 million people in the United States with epilepsy, an estimated 500,000 are not helped by current medications, according to The American Epilepsy Society. About 50,000 die each year from seizures.
      "Imagine if people could have had access to this in the ’50s, or the ’70s, when studies suggested it worked. Imagine how many people could have been helped," said Paige Figi, the first mother in Colorado Springs to treat her epileptic daughter with locally grown strain of marijuana. Five-year-old Charlotte had hundreds of seizures per day and had tried every available seizure drug without success. She was not expected to live long. The Figis had read some decades-old studies suggesting a compound in cannabis called cannabidiol could help. Desperate, they started giving Charlotte a local marijuana strain high in the compound. It reduced her seizures by 99.9 percent. She is now thriving.

      Charlotte’s success sparked a small movement, with dozens of families who have not been helped by trying traditional treatments moving to Colorado, where the oil is produced.
      Media reports featuring the Figis were the first most of these families had heard of treating seizures with cannabis, but, in fact, reports of treating seizures with cannabis stretch back more than 500 years.
      "I’m a mom, I don’t have a Ph.D. Why did we have to stumble onto this?" Paige Figi said. "We feel like science has failed us. I think it’s unfortunate it has to be parents figuring this out, and science has to catch up."

      Cannabis is very useful
      The first known reference to the anti-seizure potential of cannabis, according to a number of academic papers, comes from an Arabic treatise from 1464 that describes how the epileptic son of a high-ranking official in Baghdad was cured by regular administration of hashish.

      After returning from India, Dr. O’Shaughnassy lectured extensively in Great Britain in the 1840s on the properties of hemp and its use as a medicine in Europe became widespread.
      Sir John Russell Reynolds, the personal physician to Queen Victoria, wrote in The Lancet in 1890 on the many therapeutic uses of cannabis, saying "I have found hemp very useful" for treating epilepsy.
      In America, a publication called the Philadelphia Medical Times ran an article titled "Cannabis indica in the treatment of epilepsy" in 1878.
      By 1900, cannabis extracts were commonly found in American pharmacies.

      But, as the 20th century progressed, cannabis fell out of favor, according to the book "Cannabis in Medical Practice." Unlike opium and cocaine, the active ingredients in cannabis were harder to parse, and were not isolated until the middle of the 20th century. Pharmacists were left with a whole plant extract that could vary greatly in makeup and potency. At the same time, states were increasingly passing laws tightening control on recreational use of the plant. It was effectively banned federally by the 1937 Marihuana Tax Act.

      That year, during hearings in front of the House Committee on Ways and Means, the American Medical Association spoke against criminalizing cannabis, saying many of its members prescribed it. But the committee was swayed by the testimony of the assistant commissioner of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics, Harry Anslinger, who said, "Marijuana is the most violence-causing drug in the history of mankind. Most marijuana smokers are Negroes, Hispanics, Filipinos and entertainers. Their satanic music, jazz and swing result from marijuana usage. This marijuana causes white women to seek sexual relations with Negroes."

      Medical advances stunted
      The passage of the act ended the use of medical cannabis and led to a decades-long suppression of medical marijuana research that only started to lift with California’s first-in-the-nation medical marijuana law in 1996.

      "Looking back, a lot of this reefer madness stuff seems ridiculous but it is also one of the great tragedies of modern medicine," said Martin Lee, author of the book "Smoke Signals, a social history of marijuana." "It impeded all kinds of medical advances. Think of all the knowledge we lost. Think of all the time we lost. We have been forced to rediscover things that were there all along. And in the meantime, these poor kids."
      Even in the most restrictive years of marijuana laws, scientific studies continued to show cannabis could treat epilepsy – especially cannabidiol.
      In 1949, two doctors tested marijuana compounds with six severely epileptic children. The substance controlled seizures as well as traditional drugs with three of the children, and stopped or nearly stopped all seizures in two.

      "The Future for epileptics appears very bright," an article about the findings in the Salt Lake City Telegram said. "Because of not only one new drug, but a whole field of new compounds to combat epileptic seizures."

      But the research went nowhere.
      Similar studies in 1974, ’79, ’80, ’81, ’82 and several times since showed cannabidiol’s promising properties for regulating seizures, but each time they failed to bridge the gap from laboratory to medicine cabinet.
      "There are a number of barriers to research," said Jeffrey Hergenrather, a professor at the University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, who studies the anti-cancer properties of cannabis.
      First, he said, money is lacking because most research is funded by pharmaceutical companies, which have little to gain from a plant that can’t be patented.
      Second, because cannabis is a tightly controlled substance, he said, research involves extra regulatory steps, including having the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency inspections that discourage many researchers.
      Third, the medical establishment long had a dismissive attitude toward the research, he said.
      "It is seen by some as not serious. There is a stigma. It is difficult to get your findings published," he said.
      In addition, he said, doctors are hesitant to recommend cannabis because many have little knowledge of how it interacts with the human body.
      "There is a whole system of chemical receptors in the human body that interacts with cannabis, and they are not taught it in medical school at all," Hergenrather said. "That shows the profound effect prohibition has had."

      Cannabis now drawing attention
      Now that 20 states have some kind of legalized medical marijuana, anecdotal evidence of people using cannabis to treat a number of ailments is getting the attention of mainstream medicine, and attitudes toward cannabis are starting to change, he said.

      Orrin Devinsky, a New York University neurologist who specializes in epilepsy, illustrates that.
      In his 2012 book "Alternative therapies for epilepsy," he wrote marijuana was "not recommended to treat epilepsy." But in late 2013, after increasing anecdotal evidence of the therapeutic potential of cannabis coming out of Colorado Springs, he held a symposium in New York on the potential of cannabidiol and began a Food and Drug Administration-approved study of the treatment of epilepsy in children with the cannabis compound cannabidiol.

      "At this time, medical marijuana products show great potential for helping patients with treatment-resistant epilepsy," Devinsky told The Gazette. "However, at the current time, we lack either good safety or effectiveness data on any product. Our focus should be to obtain scientifically valid data and to remain very humble about what we do and do not know."

      Follow Dave Philipps on Twitter: @David_Philipps

      1464: Arab historian Ibn al-Badri writes that when "the epileptic son of the caliph’s chamberlain" in Baghdad was treated with cannabis "it cured him completely."
      1839: British doctor Dr. William O’Shaughnessy, left, says experiments with cannabis in India "led me to the belief that in Hemp the profession has gained an anti-convulsive remedy of the greatest value."
      1890: The personal physician to Queen Victoria, writes in The Lancet in 1890 on the medical uses of cannabis, saying "I have found hemp very useful" for treating epilepsy.
      1900: Tincture of cannabis becomes a common medicine in American pharmacies.
      1937: Medical cannabis effectively outlawed by Marihuana Tax Act.

      1949: Two doctors give cannabis to five epileptic children. Three did as well as on other drugs. One had significant improvement, and one had seizures disappear entirely.
      1977: Study of rats shows cannabidiol works as well as other anti-seizure drugs.
      1980: Double blind study shows seven of eight human epileptics helped by cannibidiol, with seizures stopping entirely in half.
      2003: British company GW Pharamaceuticals announces it plans to market a marijuana-based cannabidiol drug for epilepsy, with hopes of quick approval by the FDA. It has yet to be approved.
      2012: Colorado Springs mom Paige Figi begins treating her 5-year-old daughter, Charlotte, with a marijuana oil rich in cannadidiol, sparking a small movement to make the treatment available to all epileptics.

      – Colorado Springs-area mom Paige Figi on mission for medical marijuana

      – ‘Face of Cannabis’ project aims to raise awareness, facilitate change

      Read more at http://gazette.com/now-popular-in-colorado-marijuana-oil-has-long-success-history-thats-often-been-ignored/article/1513431#toEswLSou20ppmPH.99

       

       

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