Tag Archives: legal issues

Abolish the Drug Czar’s Office!


NORML
04/14/2017

 

The Trump Administration is widely expected to pick Representative Tom Marino for Drug Czar.

Representative Marino is a longtime, rabid drug warrior who has a consistent record of voting against marijuana law reform legislation — a position that runs counter to that of the majority of voters and his own constituents. His appointment to this office highlights the fact that this administration remains committed to the failed 1980s ‘war on drug’ playbook.

The Trump administration promised to eliminate bureaucratic waste. It should start by eliminating the office of the Drug Czar. 

The White House Drug Czar is required, by statute, “to oppose any attempt to legalize the use of a substance that is listed in Schedule I” and to “ensure that no Federal funds … shall be expended for any study or contract relating to the legalization (for a medical use or any other use) of a substance listed in Schedule I.” This narrow-minded, Flat Earth mentality refuses to acknowledge the reality that the majority of the country is now authorized to engage in the use of medical cannabis and it mandates that US drug policy be dictated by rhetoric and ideology rather than by science and evidence.

NORML opposes Marino’s appointment to Drug Czar and we further call for this anti-science position to be abolished entirely.

Click here to send a message to President Trump – End the charade of the Drug Czar by abolishing the position. 

The Drug Czar’s office is a remnant of a bygone era when US drug policy was framed as a ‘war’ fueled largely by rhetoric and ideology. In 2017 we can do better and we must. The majority of Americans view drug abuse as a public health issue, they favor regulating cannabis as opposed to criminalizing it, and they are demanding policy changes based on science and evidence.

Tell President Trump: There is no place for ‘Czars’ in today’s American government, particularly those like Marino who still cling to the outdated and failed drug war policies and misplaced ideologies of the past.

Thanks in advance for standing together with the thousands of NORML members throughout the country.

The NORML Team

P.S. Our work is supported by thousands of people throughout the country as we work to advance marijuana reform in all 50 states and at the federal level. Can you kick in $5, $10 or $20 a month to help us keep going?

 

 

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If Kentucky wants to pass br 161 "the Cannabis Freedom Act", you must do this now…


TREELeft:  Link to USMjParty Kentucky

Above: Link to Facebook Page of the “Kentucky Cannabis Freedom Coalition”

Because of the “Origination Clause” in the U.S. Constitution there must be a Representative to submit a “Companion Bill” in order for it to move forward because this clause says that all bills for raising revenue must start in the House of Representatives, but the Senate may propose or concur with amendments as in the case of other bills.

(From Wikipedia) The Origination Clause, also known as the Revenue Clause, is as follows:

All Bills for raising Revenue shall originate in the House of Representatives; but the Senate may propose or concur with Amendments as on other Bills.

COMPANION BILL – A bill which is identical to a bill having been introduced in the opposite house.

THEREFORE,

What we need to do right now is to find a Representative who is willing to back up Sen. Perry B. Clark’s BR 161 with a “COMPANION BILL” in order to be in coordination with the “Constitution”.

Please write your Representative an email or letter asking them to get behind Sen. Perry B. Clark’s BR 161 and provide a “Companion Bill” as soon as possible because the Legislative Session (calendar link here) starts on January 5th, 2016 and January 8th, is the deadline for prefiled House Bills.

The LINKS you will need are listed here (just click on picture):

LINK to KY BR 161

KyLRC 12.17.15 Ky Cannabis Freedom Act homepage

LINK to KY Legislator’s Email Addresses:  (Please note that some of the Representatives/Senators have direct email links, and some of them can be copied/pasted into your email program).

KY Legislative Email Addresses

Also, of note, this is a little more time consuming, but worth it, I believe —  When I wrote my “Email” I sent it to my individual Representative, who is Johnny Bell – in Glasgow, KY, but I also copied the email to ALL of the Kentucky Senators as well as the Representatives, so that THEY ALL would be able to see the letter I had written.

Here is the LINK to the 2016 Legislative Calendar:

KY 2016 Regular Session Legislative Calendar

As well, anyone who may have a printer, and postage money available should ideally send individual letters through the U.S. Postal Service to the Representatives given addresses.  The more “paper” we can send them, the better they will hear us speaking!

PHONE CALL’s as well will be a great help!  Please back up your letter or email with a phone call to your Representative to reiterate the issue of BR 161 !!!

PLEASE DO NOT LET THIS BILL DIE!   KEEP IT GOING WITH AN EMAIL AND A PHONE CALL TO YOUR REPRESENTATIVE TODAY!

Foreign Investors in the U.S. Cannabis Industry Face Their Own Special Risks


By Dylan Moore on October 30, 2015 Posted in Federal law and policy, Legal Issues, Medical Cannabis, Recreational Marijuana

Foreign investment in the cannabis industry. It's complicated.

The cannabis industry has always been international. Our first cannabis client was actually a Dutch company that hired us years before either Colorado or Washington had legalized. This client hired us to figure out what it would need to do as a foreign company investing in a U.S. cannabis business in a cannabis industry which this company was certain would eventually be legal. That client was unique for years, but nowadays, many more of our cannabis clients come from outside the United States. So far, they are mostly coming from Canada, the Netherlands, Australia, Germany, and Israel, with a smattering of clients from elsewhere in Europe, Latin America and Asia.

The foreign companies that contact us generally split fairly evenly between those seeking to get involved with ancillary companies and those seeking to get involved in the growing, processing or selling of cannabis. Invariably, they most want to know whether foreigners can invest in the U.S. cannabis industry and, if so, at what risk?

The short answer is a qualified yes for ancillary businesses and a qualified maybe for businesses directly involved with the plant. The immigration issues faced by foreign investors is just one of the many issues they face when investing into the US cannabis industry. But because we have been dealing with this issue frequently of late, we use it to illustrate how foreign involvement in US cannabis can be tricky.

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services maintains broad authority to limit entry of foreigners into the United States. This includes the authority to bar entry (or deport) a foreign citizen who has committed a crime, including a mere misdemeanor. Since any business activity involving marijuana remains illegal under federal law, a foreigner doing business with a cannabis company – even one operating completely legally in a state with the robust regulations required by the Cole Memo – is technically committing a crime and therefore may be deported. The Cole Memo dictates federal enforcement policy by prioritizing prosecutorial discretion; it does not create a legal defense for marijuana related crimes, even in states with legal cannabis, and it therefore offers no help to a foreign citizen in a deportation proceeding. Marijuana related activity (including involvement with state-legal marijuana) can also constitute “moral turpitude” in the eyes of immigration authorities and this designation can bar entry into the U.S. and prevent any chance of gaining U.S. citizenship.

Immigration authorities have the power to deport foreigners without having to comply with many of the legal safeguards to which U.S. citizens are entitled. For example, when immigration authorities are determining whether to deport someone for alleged criminal activity, the mere admission of the crime can often be enough to warrant summary deportation, even absent a formal conviction. This means a foreigner can be deported without ever being able to tell his or her side of the story, to explain the extenuating circumstances, or to make any other argument before a judge as to why deportation is unwarranted.

Though we are not aware of any foreign investor being deported for investing in a business that provides ancillary services or products to the cannabis industry, it is always possible that a zealous prosecutor or the USCIS will seek deportation by asserting that even ancillary businesses violate U.S. law by acting as an accessory to businesses that violate the Federal Controlled Substances Act. The deportation risks are greater for foreign investors who put their money into businesses that grow, process or sell cannabis.

Foreign investors must also always be mindful of the laws in their own country as well. And again, though we are not aware of any such prosecution, it is possible that some countries will prosecute their own citizens for having gotten involved in the cannabis industry of another country.

CONTINUE READING…

The Science of Toxicology and U.I. or "Under the Influence and/or Intoxication?" of Cannabis/Marijuana and D.O.A. Drug Testing


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The Official Court Documents that I present to you below here, {THIS ONE TIME, FOR FREE = this offer will not last and is for a limited amount of time = THIS SET OF DOCUMENTS WILL GO MISSING AND A FEE WILL BE CHARGED LATER FOR THIS INFORMATION} The following Documents were presented, accepted and registered by the Criminal or Courts as “Evidence” as they were listed by the Kentucky Courts in a case I recently Advocated in on behalf of James E. Coleman.
Are in fact, the PROOF, that Cannabis/Marijuana/Hemp or Unspecified levels of Cannabinoids are natural within the human body and that their presence or levels or “analytical threshold” combined with the fact that this test measures “no quantification of a specific compound” in the blood, are proof, there has been no measure of  intoxication, performed by this test where cannabiniods are concerned and that this test can not show toxicity.
According to this Expert Witness.
Therefore they are unable to test levels for intoxication as they claim is claimed by the manufacture of the test and/or Law Enforcement in U.I. charges or related cases. These documented facts apply to the Test it’s self given and the Cannabinoid levels… Therefore apply to all these D.O.A. = “Drug of Abuse” Blood Serum U.I. Test used by Law Enforcement and Not the Individual. As these facts apply to all humans and all these Test.

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PLEASE CONTINUE READING…

If they can "repeal" Obamacare then they can REPEAL the CSA and end the "War on Drugs" …


Yesterday the news came out about Sen. Mitch McConnell about to REPEAL OBAMACARE with a  “Simple 51-Vote Majority“.

 

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Hallelujah!

 

It is my opinion that the “Repeal” option should be utilized more often when good people get hurt by a bad law! 

That is the reason that I post about “repealing” the laws surrounding the criminalization of the Cannabis plant.

The whole plant!  Marijuana and hemp are terms used to distinguish the differences in the THC ratio/level of a given plant, however, they are both one in the same species, “Cannabis”. 

The Cannabis plant is a god-given or “earthly” gift to all of the Human species to do with as they will. 

As Humans have “free will”  by the law of “nature” or “karma” or even using the famous quote of Newton, “…for every action there is an  equal yet opposite reaction…”, and that for every good there is an evil -( it’s what evens things out) there will be those people who will misuse it.  We cannot control that.  Just as there will always be people who abuse Alcohol and Codeine.  (I could list about a zillion more drugs of abuse here but I wont)  Cannabis IS THE ONE PLANT that can be safely used without much intervention.  It is safe for most people and I do not believe in addiction to Cannabis.  I’ve smoked most of my life and have also done without for periods of time with no indications of addiction. 

So using this logic I ask you should not the laws surrounding the “Drug War” be repealed?  The laws which sent and are continuing to send people to corporate run prisons?  Any law that turns a good citizen into a common criminal should be repealed, not the least of which is the laws surrounding Cannabis.

You cannot just continue to add more law on top of more law to correct the old laws which were enacted to further the law of commerce and enslave people to begin with.

But you can damn sure go back and get rid of the bad laws via repeal, which will give people free will once again and then you can guide them in the best direction possible without incarcerating them for doing something just because you do not like it. 

The “REPEAL OBAMACARE” attempt is going to be a good case to watch.  It could set a precedent for the “repeal” of other bad laws. 

In the meantime I’ll continue to post and educate people concerning the differences between “legalize, tax and regulate”, or putting Cannabis into a Schedule II substance under the CSA (Controlled Substance Act) which is one of the worst things we could do right now, as putting it among common pharmaceuticals only increases the regulation and control thereof leading to even more arrests and possible prison time for “misusing a drug”. End prohibition now!  Free our prisoners!  REPEAL !.

Here is a link to a petition on Change.Org which I put up some time ago:  REPEAL PROHIBITION!

The following statement was published: 

McConnell, Lee Continue Effort to Repeal Obamacare Through Reconciliation

Jul 28 2015

WASHINGTON – United States Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) and U.S. Senator Mike Lee (R-UT) issued the following statements Tuesday on the important tools in the Senate’s balanced budget that allow Congress to pass legislation repealing Obamacare and its broken promises.
Leader McConnell: “Earlier this year, Senate Republicans passed a balanced budget, and with it the necessary procedural tools – via the budget reconciliation process – to bring an end to the nightmare of Obamacare.  Americans have faced skyrocketing health care costs, rampant fraud and more government between them and their doctors. And Republicans are united in working to repeal the broken promises of Obamacare and allow our country to start over fresh with real health reform that Americans deserve.  We will continue our effort to use reconciliation – as the budget makes clear – to fulfill the promise we made to our constituents.”
Sen. Lee: “Americans deserve quality health care at affordable prices and Obamacare is giving them the exact opposite. A Senate vote to repeal Obamacare on a simple majority basis through reconciliation is the best way to pursue that goal. The Majority Leader and I are committed to using reconciliation to repeal Obamacare in the 114th Congress.”

Permalink: http://www.lee.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/2015/7/mcconnell-lee-continue-effort-to-repeal-obamacare-through-reconciliation

 

Related Articles:

 

https://kentuckymarijuanaparty.com/2015/06/26/the-protection-of-commerce-in-the-form-of-pharmaceutical-industrial-complex/

http://www.usmjparty.com/repeal-prohibition

https://kentuckymarijuanaparty.com/2012/09/25/to-all-those-who-believe-that-total-repeal-of-prohibition-is-impossible-i-say/

https://americansforcannabis.com

https://kentuckymarijuanaparty.com/2015/05/07/all-roads-in-kentucky-lead-you-through-hell/

http://dailycaller.com/2014/12/05/prohibition-repeal-is-a-good-model-for-marijuana-legalization/

http://www.omninerd.com/articles/Random_Drug_Screening_For_Welfare_Recipients

http://www.constitutionalcannabis.com/

https://kentuckymarijuanaparty.com/2014/01/02/on-legalization-when-the-u-n-comes-a-marching-along-we-will-all-be-singing-a-brand-new-song/

https://cpcholding.wordpress.com/2015/06/10/misuse-of-drugs-act-1971-is-it-well-out-of-date/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Misuse_of_Drugs_Act_1971

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Single_Convention_on_Narcotic_Drugs

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Nations_Convention_Against_Illicit_Traffic_in_Narcotic_Drugs_and_Psychotropic_Substances

http://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/data-and-analysis/bulletin/bulletin_1966-01-01_1_page002.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commission_on_Narcotic_Drugs#Role_in_drug_scheduling

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Controlled_Substances_Act

 

Bad laws are made to be repealed! 

re·peal

rəˈpēl/

verb

verb: repeal; 3rd person present: repeals; past tense: repealed; past participle: repealed; gerund or present participle: repealing

  1. 1.revoke or annul (a law or congressional act).

    “the legislation was repealed five months later”

    “the Eighteenth Amendment was repealed in 1933”

noun

noun: repeal; plural noun: repeals

1.

the action of revoking or annulling a law or congressional act.

“the House voted in favor of repeal”

Repeal of Prohibition in the United States. Enacted by the Eighteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, it proved to be so ineffective that it had to be repealed by the Twenty-first Amendment. This is the only constitutional amendment to be repealed in the U.S.

Additionally, see this information when Ireland Repeals laws dating back several hundred years!

  • The massive Statute Law Revision Act 2007 in the Republic of Ireland, through which 3,225 Acts were repealed, dating back over eight centuries to 1171 and the earliest laws enacted by England when it began its invasion of Ireland. The statutes repealed include a number of Acts of significant historical interest, including an Act of 1542 providing that the Kings of England shall be Kings of Ireland. This Act is the largest single repealing statute in the history of Ireland.

TWENTY YEARS OF NARCOTICS CONTROL UNDER THE UNITED NATIONS

excerpt from http://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/data-and-analysis/bulletin/bulletin_1966-01-01_1_page002.html#s120

III. The problems in 1946: the first solutions

In order to attempt an assessment of the work done and the evolution which took place since the Commission first met in November 1946, it is first necessary to ascertain what the narcotics situation was at that date. Three elements have to be taken into consideration: the first is the legal basis of the control, i.e. the international treaties then in existence. The second is the disruptions that the war had caused, and the third is the changes which occurred in the world during and immediately after the war. The Commission could not tackle these tasks one after the other and it had to work on all of them simultaneously. Still, it may be stated that, generally speaking, the task of bringing the narcotics situation of the world back to normal was the first undertaken. This occupied part of the first few sessions of the Commission. The Commission was, however, aware of the fact that it was not just taking over directly from the League of Nations, since there lay a six years’ gap in between. It had therefore to assess the changes which made it necessary to adapt the treaty system to the demands of the international community and to work out improvements to that system (through interim measures before addressing itself to the long-term exercise of drafting a single convention).

The treaty system in 1946

In 1946, the international control of narcotics was regulated by six treaties: the International Opium Convention signed at The Hague on 23 January 1912; the Agreement concerning the Manufacture, Internal Trade in and Use of Prepared Opium signed at Geneva on 11 February 1925; the International Opium Convention signed at Geneva on 19 February 1925; the Convention for Limiting the Manufacture and Regulating the Distribution of Narcotic Drugs signed at Geneva on 13 July 1931; the Agreement for the Control of Opium-Smoking in the Far East signed at Bangkok on 27 November 1931; and the Convention for the Suppression of the Illicit Traffic in Dangerous Drugs signed at Geneva on 26 July 1936.

The Hague Convention formulated the basic principles for the international control which have retained their validity to the present day. The two Agreements on opium smoking were very limited in scope and in fact had very little influence in terms of actual control.

Marijuana addiction drug research gets $3 million grant as Obama encourages legalization


By Kelly Riddell – The Washington Times – Thursday, June 25, 2015

 

 

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The National Institutes of Health is dedicating $3 million to fast-track the development of drugs to treat marijuana addiction — an estimated 4.2 million Americans are hooked on cannabis — even as the president encourages its legalization and more states look to enact laws for its recreational use.

“Cannabis use is an increasing public health concern in the United States that requires immediate attention,” reads the government’s grant proposal, issued in May. “Given the high prevalence of marijuana use and its associated disorders and the large number of people who seek treatment, there is a critical need to discover and develop safe and effective treatments for [cannabis use disorders].”

The National Institutes of Health and the National Institute on Drug Abuse plan to award $3 million to fund three projects aimed at fast-tracking research on drugs to help curb marijuana abuse, and the Food and Drug Administration has not approved any medications to treat pot addiction.

In its proposal, the National Institute on Drug Abuse states that marijuana is the most commonly used illicit drug, with an estimated 2.4 million people trying it for the first time last year, and has the highest number of Americans dependent on or abusing it.

The institute’s call for research seems to divert from policies touted by the Obama administration, which has been the most progressive in history allowing for marijuana use.

In March, President Obama said he was “encouraged” by efforts at the state level to allow greater access to marijuana. In an interview with The New Yorker last year, he said, “I don’t think [marijuana] is more dangerous than alcohol.”

During Mr. Obama’s tenure, the Department of Justice said it would not prosecute or enforce laws against the production and sale of marijuana at the state level. To date, 23 states and the District of Columbia have enacted laws allowing pot to be used for a variety of medical conditions. Colorado, Oregon, Washington, Alaska and the District of Columbia have permitted recreational use of pot.

The administration’s most recent move loosening the federal restrictions on weed was made Monday, when it lifted a bureaucratic requirement for those wishing to conduct scientific research on the drug.

For committing $3 million in taxpayer money to find a treatment to a drug that the administration is looking to make more accessible, the National Institute on Drug Abuse gets this week’s Golden Hammer, The Washington Times’ weekly distinction highlighting waste, fraud and abuse — or in this case hypocrisy — in the federal government.

“The public discourse has shifted in recent years to only want to talk about the benefits of marijuana. But addiction is the huge elephant in the room that many lawmakers want to sweep under the carpet,” said Kevin Sabet, who served in the Obama administration as senior adviser at the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy. “The problem is huge and, as marijuana becomes more legal, we’re going to be seeing it more often.”

According to a study by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, the number of heavy marijuana users has increased sevenfold in the U.S. since its lowest point in 1992. Although the heavy marijuana users represent only about 2 percent of the U.S. population, daily and near-daily marijuana users consume 80 percent of the marijuana in the country.

“The entire medical community is aware of marijuana addiction and how big a problem it is,” said Dr. Stuart Gitlow, a former president at the American Society of Addiction Medicine. “If we go back to the time of Prohibition — from a public health standpoint it was an enormous success, there was a per capita drop in the consumption of alcohol, in accidents related to alcohol, and liver disease was reduced by two-thirds. After it ended, all of these stats went back to where they were before.”

He predicted similar results as marijuana prohibition eases.

“Ending the prohibition of marijuana, what we’ll see is a dramatic increase in its use and the total number of people affected by issues like intoxication and addiction,” he said.

Mr. Gitlow estimates that 15 percent to 20 percent of youths and 10 percent of adults who try marijuana will become addicted to it. Qualities commonly associated with pot addiction are apathy, loss of concentration, paranoia and increased likelihood of psychosis, which leads to increased psychiatric admissions, he said.

Story Continues →

Read more: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2015/jun/25/marijuana-addiction-drug-research-gets-3-million-g/#ixzz3e8y20im5
Follow us: @washtimes on Twitter

Medical marijuana backers lose bid for looser regulations


By Tom Schoenberg, © 2013, Bloomberg News

 

WASHINGTON — An appeals court rejected the bid by medical marijuana backers to ease federal controls of the drug, ruling that the government properly kept the substance in its most dangerous category.

A three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals on Tuesday upheld the Drug Enforcement Administration’s decision to maintain marijuana as a Schedule I drug under the Controlled Substances Act because there are no adequate scientific studies finding an acceptable medical use.

“The question before the court is not whether marijuana could have some medical benefits,” U.S. Circuit Judge Harry Edwards wrote in the opinion.

Edwards said the court’s review was limited to whether the DEA’s decision declining to reschedule the drug was arbitrary and capricious. He said the court found there was “substantial evidence” to support the agency’s determination that such studies don’t exist.

The case involves a 10-year-old petition from medical marijuana advocates who asked the DEA to reclassify marijuana as a Schedule III, IV or V drug, which would allow for looser regulation. On June 21, 2011, the DEA rejected the request, stating that existing clinical evidence wasn’t adequate to warrant reclassification.

“To deny that sufficient evidence is lacking on the medical efficacy of marijuana is to ignore a mountain of well- documented studies that conclude otherwise,” Joe Elford, chief counsel with Americans for Safe Access, the medical marijuana advocacy


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organization that brought the case, said in an e-mailed statement.

Elford told the court during arguments in October that there were more than 200 studies that the agency refused to consider.

The group said it will appeal the ruling, according to the statement.

Lena Watkins, a lawyer for the Justice Department, told the court in October that the studies cited by the marijuana proponents were rejected because the research didn’t meet government standards. She said about 15 studies meet the standards, though the government doesn’t have the final results yet.

The court also waved off claims that government blocked efforts to study the medical effects of marijuana, citing the Health and Human Services Department policy supporting the clinical research with botanical marijuana.

“It appears that adequate and well-controlled studies are wanting not because they have been foreclosed but because they have not been completed,” Edwards said in the ruling.

CONTINUE READING…

Rand Paul: Relax Marijuana Penalties, Allow States To Determine Pot Policy


 

 

Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) continued to field questions this week about a possible entrance into the 2016 Republican presidential mix, reinforcing his views that legal penalties for marijuana offenses should be reduced and that states should be responsible for crafting their own laws regarding the plant.

In an interview with ABC, Paul said that while he did not personally support marijuana being legalized, or even used, for that matter, he did believe that punishments surrounding it were overly harsh.

“I think for example we should tell young people, ‘I’m not in favor of you smoking pot, but if you get caught smoking pot, I don’t want to put you in jail for 20 years,'” Paul said.

The senator went on to argue that states such as Washington and Colorado, which both voted to legalize and tax marijuana earlier this month, should be permitted to have their moves stand, despite running contrary to federal laws determining the drug to be an illegal substance.

“States should be allowed to make a lot of these decisions,” Paul said. “I want things to be decided more at a local basis, with more compassion. I think it would make us as Republicans different.”

He made similar comments in an earlier interview with Politico, saying that he planned to reach across the aisle to Senate Democrats in hopes of addressing his concerns with marijuana sentencing legislatively.

Both Paul and his father, retiring Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas), have been outspoken proponents of states’ rights and compassion when it comes to marijuana laws. They’ve also both been avid supporters of legalizing the production of industrial hemp, a non-psychoactive relative of marijuana that has been caught up in the wider net of drug laws.

CONTINUE READING…

NCADP Online Conference Video


NCADP Online Conference Video

 

The National Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty is excited to present this live online conference exploring how communities can be safer without the death penalty. The conference will be broadcast over the web and will be approximately one hour in length. View the conference right here, on this page!

This will be a video conference with presenters live in California, Maryland and Massachusetts. We need your help to advertise this event.

Join us for a fascinating discussion addressing the question, “does the death penalty actually keep us safer?” with Charles Ogletree, Harvard University and founder of the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice, Ron McAndrew, former warden of Florida State Prison who conducted that state’s final electrocutions, Kirk Bloodsworth, the first person exonerated from death row using DNA evidence, and Jerry Givens, former corrections officer from Virginia who put 62 men to death during his 17 years as an executioner.

Send us your questions in advance by tweeting them to #abolition2012.

THE VIDEO IS AVAILABLE TO VIEW AT THIS LINK….