Tag Archives: Marijuana

Hey Sheree, I find this photo annoying or distasteful. Would you please take it down?


ShereeKrider, May 20, 2017

WIN_20170520_17_02_00_Pro

President Lincoln did not issue the Emancipation Proclamation until January 1, 1863, more than one and a half years after the war started. His goal was initially to preserve the Union, and he only issued that proclamation when he felt doing so would promote that objective. One could argue that if the primary cause of the war was slavery then Lincoln’s first act would have been to free them. Historians have written many volumes on Lincoln’s timing and motivation, but one thing is clear: slavery was not his first priority. LINK

Jon Davis Msg

Although it is hard to read because the screenshot above is not very clear, the following is the message I received from a man named JonDavis on Facebook with whom I had absolutely no connection that I could find.  He also had no friends so I am assuming that he was some kind of troll.

You and Jon Davis aren’t connected on Facebook

11:07am

Hey Sheree, I find this photo annoying or distasteful.
Would you please take it down before I share it to every internet group that finds racism and monuments to slavery  distasteful. The fallout could cost you dearly.

 

CSA Glasgow

The following link was attached to the message which was a photo of a Statue of “Our Confederate Dead”, in Glasgow, Kentucky.

https://www.facebook.com/shereekrider/posts/10155481086732994

I love everyone.  I do not look at color, religion nor nationality when choosing friends or who to engage in conversation with.  I respect all peoples rights and would never intentionally hurt another person physically  or otherwise.  I care about everyone – yes, I care about the Confederate’s too.  That does not mean that I encourage nor agree with Slavery … the kind in the past OR the kind we live in right now OR the futuristic kind!  I believe in the freedom of humanity.  I believe in the right to live and let live.  I believe in the human rights of ALL people – worldwide.

Today, and for all of known history, that seems to be what the World is about…who gets to control the “Slaves” today?  How can we get the “Slaves” to follow us instead of “them”?  What kind of fucked up bullshit can we tell them that will bring them to “Our” side?  What will keep everybody up in arms and against each other because we all know that “a house divided always fails”! 

Above all, never let them know the truth of our history.  That would fuck up “Our” plans for sure!  We have to keep “them” believing that we are working towards a better future for “them”. 

Control of our bodies and minds is the way they will accomplish this.  Remove all historical truth and replace with bullshit lies that all pass the “smell test”.  As long as it “seems” believable, and “We” are in charge, they will believe “us”.  That keeps “us” in control of everything and everybody.

When debating the 13th amendment, many in Congress were not thinking of slaves, but rather white labor, as Senator Henry Wilson said, “The same influences that go to keep down and crush down the rights of the poor black man bear down and oppress the poor white laboring man.”  LINK

I thought I would use this as the reason to say something about the situation and to get out the facts as I see them, that our history is being robbed from us before our very eyes.

New Orleans removes a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee from its perch of 133 years

I don’t know who was behind the actual message.  Obviously it came from a fake profile.  I don’t know why they find it “distasteful”?  I don’t know why they would want to infringe upon my right to post a picture I took at a Courthouse in my hometown.  I really do not know why they felt the need to threaten me, although I feel it was just a ploy to see what my reaction would be.  So …here is my reaction:

For some number of years there has been an ongoing attempt to eradicate our history.  It would probably be best for those who are most  served by ignorance to erase, from the minds of men, the history that got us where we are today.

For purposes of this opinion I will only go back as far as the Civil War,  however, the cover-up goes much deeper than that – further than most people can comprehend…

The individual is handicapped by coming face-to-face with a conspiracy so monstrous he cannot
believe it exists. The American mind simply has not come to a realization of the evil which has been
introduced into our midst. It rejects even the assumption that human creatures could espouse a
philosophy which must ultimately destroy all that is good and decent.”

The Civil War was not fought in order to free the slaves as we have been taught in school.  The Civil War was a fight between the  agriculturalists and the industrialists.  The slaves needed to be freed so that industry could prevail – they needed workers.  Immediately upon end of the Civil War the Slaves went to work for the railroads and many other industrial jobs – as paid slaves or “convicts”,  in not too different of a situation than from what they had come, and in some cases worse.  However, they could officially call themselves free men because they weren’t slaves any longer, they were convicts.

 

The history of our servitude can be researched back throughout our history on Earth.  It is imperative that we remember what has happened in our past.  Our history can foretell our future.  Removing statues of the Confederate history of our Country is a very dangerous thing to do because it erases our memories of what happened in our past – things that need to be remembered so that we can avoid them again – and to remember the people,  ALL of them, who fought and died for a cause, doing what they thought was right – at the time – to protect their way of life and most importantly defending the very lives of their family and friends – People who were being murdered by an opposing force – be it right or wrong – which had encroached upon their lives. 

After the Civil War, the 13th, 14th, and 15th Constitutional amendments were passed with the intention of establishing equality under the law for newly freed slaves, or so the story goes. The fact of the matter is that slavery was – and still is – completely legal in the United States, only in a much different form. The institution of slavery, as we’ve come to understand it, actually underwent an evolution of sorts. Instead of having the direct enslavement of blacks with an entire apparatus used to keep slaves in their condition, certain elements of the state apparatus were piecemealed over time to enslave blacks, namely the legal and prison systems. Hence, the act of enslavement itself changed as black convicts were no longer slaves to individual masters, but rather they were enslaved to the companies which they were leased out to. To create this system, there not only had to be the involvement of the Southern judicial system and individual Northern and Southern elites, but also the involvement and reinstitution of slavery within a corporate context.

Lincoln was caught in the middle between the Northern industrialists and the Southern agriculturists, who both wanted to dominate Western expansion because of the wealth it offered. The industrialists knew that the agriculturists depended on slavery because cotton, upon which Southern wealth was based, was very labor intensive and required the inexpensive labor that slavery provided. They knew that if the Western lands were declared “free states” then the Southern agriculturists would be unable to compete, and would be forced to leave Western expansion, and its potential profits, to the Northern industrialists.  LINK

I invite you to take the time to read  “The Elkhorn Manifesto”, and learn a little bit more about our history than you were probably taught in school.  Don’t fall as ignorant prey to the Nazification of America.  Many people who were born after WWII were not taught anything about this information either in school nor in their households.  I just happen to be the child of a WWII Veteran, my family was older, and I was allowed to listen to everyone talk around the dinner table.  I remembered some of what I had heard and as I got older and had access to the internet I looked up things on “google” Laughing out loud and I started to learn things.  True enough, you have to be careful about where you get your information from, however, most truthful information does not come from ABC, NBC, CBS or Cable News Services.

Another important and informative piece of information is “Hemp:  The Invisible Prohibition Revealed”.

Fight for the Freedom from Prohibition of Your Freedom’s!

Fight for the fucking truth!  Preserve our history!  Embrace it, learn from it, please do not eradicate it!

New Orleans can take down General Lee if they want to, but I’m keeping my picture of “Our Confederate Dead” on my Facebook Profile and my Confederate Flag in my closet (no pun intended – it is ripped)…

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Above:  My Grandson playing in the yard with Grandpa and the family dogs, Gus and Sassy.

 

To clearly understand the circumstances which existed during the 1930s and 1940s, and are the subject of this booklet, it would be helpful to first put the hemp / petrochemical conflict into historical perspective. The events which took place in the years leading up to World War II were a continuation of a struggle between agricultural and industrial interests that began before the American Revolution, a struggle which has yet to be decided, even today. LINK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://web.archive.org/web/20041208084352/kentucky.usmjparty.com/policy_elkhorn.htm

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jeff-schweitzer/slavery-and-the-civil-war_b_849066.html

https://betterworldcampaign.org/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lincoln%27s_House_Divided_Speech

https://kentuckymarijuanaparty.com/2015/10/26/rights-and-freedoms-may-in-no-case-be-exercised-contrary-to-purposes-and-principles-of-the-united-nations-how-the-united-nations-is-stealing-our-unalienable-rights-to-grow/

http://www.hamptoninstitution.org/convictleasesystem.html

https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=servitude+definition

http://web.archive.org/web/20041208084352/kentucky.usmjparty.com/policy_elkhorn.htm

http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/pass+the+smell+test

http://www.constitutionalcannabis.com/uploads/1/3/5/9/13590809/chipr_web.pdf

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/confederate-monuments-coming/

http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-new-orleans-general-lee-20170519-story.html

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10153869698472994&set=a.10151816278717994.1073741825.761977993&type=3&theater

http://www.cafepress.com/shereekrider

http://jackiewhiting.net/amstudies/Units1314/Liberty/SlaveryAbolition.html

Not taking an action that can provide such benefit in fighting this (opioid) scourge is not only callus and inhuman but also morally indefensible!


 

Image may contain: 4 people, people standing and outdoor

 

Image may contain: 2 people, eyeglasses and text

By:  Msgt. Thomas Tony Vance, Alexandria, Ky.

Callus and Morally Indefensible!

Mercy Health Hospitals in an Op-ed in the May 11, 2017 Kentucky Enquirer talks about the opioid epidemic and calls for a multi-pronged approach in dealing with it. Their program of Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment, SBIRT, has screened thousands of patients. Unfortunately they do not give any stats that show the program is effective. They also state we should treat addiction as the disease it is. That is exactly what Nixon’s commission on drugs advised back in the early 70s. Instead we got the war on drugs!

As effective as the Mercy Health approach is, there is a more effective action that can drop the number of opioid overdose deaths by more than half. As reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association, States with medical cannabis laws see a 25% drop in opioid overdose deaths in the first year after legalizing medical marijuana which grows to 33% by year 6. We can cut our opioid overdose deaths by a third simply by legalizing medical marijuana.

In Colorado which has both medical and recreational marijuana legalization, have seen a drop of 66% since medical legalization was approved in 2012. They had 479 opioid overdose deaths for 2015 and that dropped to 442 for 2016.

Let us compare Kentucky and Colorado. Colorado has 5.5 million people and Kentucky has 4.5 million. Colorado has comparable medical and addiction services and is similar to Kentucky in many ways. The only major difference is Colorado has embraced marijuana legalization and Kentucky, even though medical legalization polls at 80% favorability and recreational at 60%, has rejected legalization. Colorado’s numbers for 2015 were 479 and Kentucky’s were 1278, almost 3 times that of Colorado.

Given the facts of the benefits of marijuana legalization in preventing opioid overdose deaths by more than half, as is the case in Colorado, no one can claim to be serious about opioid addiction and overdose deaths without including cannabis legalization as a tool to fight this epidemic. Cannabis legalization, in reality, has a better record of mitigating this epidemic than any other policy that has been tried or is currently in use! I dare our legislators to name another policy that can drop the number of these deaths by a third. They can’t.

Veterans suffering from chronic pain and Post Traumatic Stress stop taking an average of 8 different prescriptions for pain meds and meds to deal with the side effects of the various medicines they are given when they start using medical cannabis. Veterans claim far better outcomes than their counter parts who stay on the VA cocktail prescribed for pain and PTSD.

We need credible action to fight this devastating epidemic. What we are currently doing is not effective. Adding addiction services will help but it seems the easiest, most effective and credible action we can take right now is simply to legalize cannabis for medical and recreational uses and watch the numbers fall! Not taking an action that can provide such benefit in fighting this scourge is not only callus and inhuman but also morally indefensible!

CONTINUE READING…

Senators from both parties try to ease banking for marijuana businesses


Cannabis grower Steve Dillon tends to his plants on his farm in Humboldt County, California, U.S. August 28, 2016.  REUTERS/Rory Carroll

By Lisa Lambert | WASHINGTON

Republican and Democratic senators on Wednesday renewed their drive to make banking easier for marijuana-based businesses in those U.S. states where the drug is legal, undeterred by signals from the Trump administration about maintaining tough marijuana restrictions nationally.

The eight senators, who spanned the political spectrum from libertarian-leaning Republican Rand Paul to liberal Democrat Cory Booker, introduced the bill to block federal banking regulators from somehow pushing a financial institution to stop serving a state-sanctioned marijuana business or the businesses’ landlords or lawyers.

The government would also not be allowed to give banks incentives to cut off the businesses.

While marijuana is legal for medicinal or recreational use in 44 states, the federal government still considers it an illegal and highly dangerous drug.

Under former President Barack Obama, a Democrat, regulators gave banks guidance on working with cannabis-related businesses and staying within the law. But the guidance intimidated most financial institutions and they cut ties with the sector, saying compliance with extensive requirements was too expensive and did not assure them they would not be prosecuted in the future.

The current situation leads dispensaries to either deal all in cash or hide their business’ true nature from banks, creating public-safety and legal risks, lawmakers say.

The unlikely collection of senators sponsoring Wednesday’s bill have attempted to get similar legislation approved before, and gained wider support with each try. That could help the legislation pass the closely divided Senate.

Since President Donald Trump took office in January, marijuana advocates have staged demonstrations in Washington, including distributing hundreds of free joints on inauguration day.

But last week, Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who has long opposed easing pot restrictions, ordered the Justice Department to toughen prosecutions of all magnitudes of drug crimes. He has also made drugs a top issue for his crime-reduction task force.

Proponents of legalizing pot, meanwhile, were worried by a statement Trump released when he signed a massive spending bill at the beginning of the month.

In part, Trump used the statement to signal that he would like to go after states’ medical marijuana laws. The spending bill bars Justice from using any funds to block states from implementing those laws, a prohibition that Trump said goes against his constitutional responsibility to faithfully execute federal laws.

(Reporting by Lisa Lambert; Editing by Tom Brown)

CONTINUE READING…

Shop owner pleads guilty in marijuana pipe case


YGTBFKM

 

Daniel Borunda , El Paso Times Published 6:30 p.m. MT May 16, 2017

An El Paso woman pleaded guilty Tuesday to a federal charge for selling marijuana pipes to undercover officers at her smoke shop in Sunland Park, the U.S. Attorney’s Office in New Mexico said.

Brenda Riveroll, 36, pleaded guilty in federal court in Las Cruces to a charge of selling drug paraphernalia. She was sentenced to five years’ probation as part of a plea deal, prosecutors said in a news release.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office said that Riveroll was the owner and only employee of The Smoke Shop on Palomas Court, which sold bongs, glass and metal pipes, scales and grinders for marijuana.

On May 12, 2016, the shop was raided by law enforcement a few weeks after Riveroll had sold the pipes to the undercover officers. On April 3, Riveroll was arrested by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration after she was indicted.

CONTINUE READING…

Federal Appeals Court Sidesteps Major Marijuana Ruling


The Associated Press / May 17, 2017

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A federal appeals court has sidestepped making a ruling on whether U.S. prison officials can hold people who were convicted of marijuana offences that were legal under state medical marijuana laws.

In a decision Wednesday, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals focused instead on a narrower issue.

The court was considering a legal challenge by prisoner Matthew Davies, who was convicted of federal marijuana charges. Davies said he ran medical marijuana dispensaries that complied with California law.

He argued that the Bureau of Prisons could not hold him because of a federal regulation that restricted interference by U.S. officials in the implementation of state medical marijuana laws.

The 9th Circuit avoided the issue, ruling instead that Davies’ plea agreement did not allow his legal challenge. Davies’ attorney, Cody Harris, said he is analyzing the ruling.

Leafly News has obtained the court’s full ruling and uploaded it to Scribd:

LINK

 

CONTINUE READING…

“…We need support in dealing with transnational criminal organizations and dealing with human trafficking – not in going after grandma’s medicinal marijuana,”


marijuana

Kamala Harris to Trump: Leave grandma’s marijuana alone

By Sean Cockerham

scockerham@mcclatchydc.com

WASHINGTON

Sen. Kamala Harris of California used the year’s first big 2020 presidential spotlight Tuesday to rail against Trump administration drug policies and call for easing laws governing marijuana.

“Let me tell you what California needs, Jeff Sessions. We need support in dealing with transnational criminal organizations and dealing with human trafficking – not in going after grandma’s medicinal marijuana,” she said, referring to Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

Tuesday’s Ideas Conference, put on by the influential liberal think tank Center for American Progress, was a widely watched testing ground for a Democratic Party that is desperately in search of new leadership. More than 100 reporters signed up to cover the event, with hundreds of spectators in the audience at a ballroom in the Four Seasons hotel in Georgetown.

Harris’ address comes as the freshman senator broadens her profile, including in recent days an extended appearance on CNN’s “The Lead” and the commencement address at Howard University, her alma mater. Harris was among the most anticipated Democratic up-and-comers in an Ideas Conference lineup that also included oft-mentioned potential presidential candidates such as Sens. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota and Cory Booker of New Jersey.

Harris insists she’s not thinking about a run for president but progressive leaders at the Ideas Conference were closely watching her with 2020 in mind.

Michele Jawando, vice president for legal progress at the Center for American Progress, was struck by Harris’ decision to focus on Sessions’ criminal justice policies – an issue that’s been lost amid the fire hose of news about Trump’s Russia controversies.

“(Harris) is without question someone we’re going to continue to talk about,” she said.

Harris focused on Sessions’ new dictate that federal prosecutors pursue the toughest criminal penalties possible – including mandatory minimum sentences – for drugs and other crimes. Sessions is threatening to pursue federal marijuana prosecutions even in states like California that voted to legalized pot.

“While I don’t believe in legalizing all drugs – as a career prosecutor I just don’t – we need to do the smart thing, the right thing, and finally decriminalize marijuana,” Harris said, in one of the strongest pro-pot statements that she has made in her political career.

Harris called Sessions’ push for maximum sentences a revival of a failed war on drugs in which Latinos and African-Americans were disproportionately incarcerated and the nation’s drug issues only got worse.

“Instead of going after violent crime, drug cartels, and major traffickers, we’re worried about the neighborhood street-level dealer,” she said. “Instead of addressing the core issue of addiction and getting folks into treatment, we’re going to overcrowd and build more prisons.”

Harris told the progressive crowd that the issue offers an opening for them to ally with conservatives. Republicans including Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky oppose harsh sentencing such as mandatory minimum terms as a useless destroyer of lives. And opioid addiction is devastating red and blue states alike.

The Ideas Conference had Californians at the forefront of the Democratic Party’s search for leadership. California Reps. Nancy Pelosi, Adam Schiff and Maxine Waters were featured and billionaire environmentalist Tom Steyer, a potential candidate for governor of California, made an appearance.

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, also a possible candidate for governor next year, gave the opening address.

CONTINUE READING…

Nevada’s new DUI marijuana testing is improvement but still poses concerns


USMJP4 2100x700

 

Ray Hagar, rhagar@rgj.com

The state of Nevada is poised to mandate the use blood tests and eliminate urine tests in DUI convictions for marijuana.

Although Washoe County already uses blood tests for pot, the state Senate this week gave the final vote of approval for the testing change for the entire state. Now, this measure only needs the final ‘John Hancock’ from Gov. Brian Sandoval to become law.

The final Senate vote floor vote comes less than two months before the July 1 starting date for sales of legal marijuana for “recreation” across Nevada for everyone 21 and over.

The blood-test/pot bill’s sponsor, Assembly Judiciary Committee Chair Steve Yeager, D-Las Vegas, sold the bill to fellow lawmakers as a “common sense” approach to DUI testing for pot. Current urine testing for pot is not reliable because it does not test for the psychoactive element that gets you high — THC, he said.

“A urine test will tell you if someone has ingested marijuana in the past,” Yeager said on Nevada Newsmakers. “But it does not tell you if the person is actually impaired at the time the testing is done.”

Blood tests can reveal THC in the blood, Yeager said. He called it “a step in the right direction.”

Yet this is not a perfect science. Determining marijuana impairment is more complicated than determining alcohol impairment, according to a study by the AAA, the nation’s largest auto club.

Yeager’s bill may be an improvement over the old method but it is still not a great way to test for marijuana intoxication, according to the AAA.

That study states it is not possible to set a blood-test threshold for THC impairment because there is no science that shows at what level drivers become high after ingesting THC, according to a CBS News story about the AAA report.

Some drivers with high levels of THC in their blood may not be impaired, especially if they are heavy pot users, the study stated. Others, who may not use marijuana often, could have relatively low levels of THC in their blood and be impaired for driving, according to the study.

In Nevada, however, almost any amount of THC in the blood will get you into trouble. The legal limit is 2 nanograms of active THC in the blood, which Yeager said is a very low limit.

“I’ll just say, our levels and laws are very, very low. So it is virtually impossible to test positive on a blood test and not be over the allowed limits under the (Nevada) statute,” Yeager said.

Nevada is about to embark on society-changing era where marijuana is legal. The AAA study, however is concerning. It suggests consuming this herb can make you a victim of a legal system that has no universally-accepted and accurate way of testing for DUI marijuana.

Perhaps Yeager’s bill will give Nevada a law based on the best technology available. It appears better than the current system.

Yet science marches on.

Yeager believes that the question of testing for marijuana DUI may need adjustments in the near future. It is a subject that the Legislature may need to revisit when better technology and testing methods become available, since this legal recreational pot business is projected to be popular and profitable in Nevada.

“I think everyone is open-mined about it,” Yeager said about marijuana DUI testing. “It (possible new state law) is a small step forward. But I think it is significant in that it gets us moving in the right direction. Hopefully, we’ll have some studies in the near future so we can continue to tweak these laws.”

CONTINUE READING…

H.R.1227 – Ending Federal Marijuana Prohibition Act of 2017


 

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PLEASE CONTACT YOUR REPRESENTATIVES TODAY AND SUPPORT THIS BILL TO REMOVE CANNABIS/MARIJUANA FROM THE CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE ACT!

THIS IS THE CLOSEST THING TO A “REPEAL” BILL THAT HAS BEEN OFFERED AND IT IS BEING SUPPORTED BY MOST ACTIVISTS!

 

Find your legislator HERE!

 

To write or call the White House, click here

 

AND FINALLY, WE USE TWITTER!

The White House

@WhiteHouse

 

President Trump

@POTUS

 

 

February 27, 2017

Mr. Garrett (for himself, Ms. Gabbard, and Mr. Taylor) introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Energy and Commerce, and in addition to the Committee on the Judiciary, for a period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned


A BILL

To limit the application of Federal laws to the distribution and consumption of marihuana, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. Short title.

This Act may be cited as the “Ending Federal Marijuana Prohibition Act of 2017”.

SEC. 2. Application of the Controlled Substances Act to marihuana.

(a) In general.—Part A of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 801 et seq.) is amended by adding at the end the following:

“SEC. 103. Application of this Act to marihuana.

“(a) Prohibition on certain shipping or transportation.—This Act shall not apply to marihuana, except that it shall be unlawful only to ship or transport, in any manner or by any means whatsoever, marihuana, from one State, territory, or district of the United States, or place noncontiguous to but subject to the jurisdiction thereof, into any other State, territory, or district of the United States, or place noncontiguous to but subject to the jurisdiction thereof, or from any foreign country into any State, territory, or district of the United States, or place noncontiguous to but subject to the jurisdiction thereof, when such marihuana is intended, by any person interested therein, to be received, possessed, sold, or in any manner used, either in the original package or otherwise, in violation of any law of such State, territory, or district of the United States, or place noncontiguous to but subject to the jurisdiction thereof.

“(b) Penalty.—Whoever knowingly violates subsection (a) shall be fined under title 18, United States Code, imprisoned not more than 1 year, or both.”.

(b) Table of contents.—The table of contents for the Comprehensive Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Act of 1970 (Public Law 91–513; 84 Stat. 1236) is amended by striking the item relating to section 103 and inserting the following:

“Sec. 103. Application of this Act to marihuana.”.

SEC. 3. Deregulation of marihuana.

(a) Removed from schedule of controlled substances.—Subsection (c) of Schedule I of section 202(c) of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812(c)) is amended—

(1) by striking “marihuana”; and

(2) by striking “tetrahydrocannabinols”.

(b) Removal of prohibition on import and export.—Section 1010(b) of the Controlled Substances Import and Export Act (21 U.S.C. 960) is amended—

(1) in paragraph (1)—

(A) in subparagraph (F), by inserting “or” after the semicolon;

(B) by striking subparagraph (G); and

(C) by redesignating subparagraph (H) as subparagraph (G);

(2) in paragraph (2)—

(A) in subparagraph (F), by inserting “or” after the semicolon;

(B) by striking subparagraph (G); and

(C) by redesignating subparagraph (H) as subparagraph (G);

(3) in paragraph (3), by striking “paragraphs (1), (2), and (4)” and inserting “paragraphs (1) and (2)”;

(4) by striking paragraph (4); and

(5) by redesignating paragraphs (5), (6), and (7) as paragraphs (4), (5), and (6), respectively.

SEC. 4. Conforming amendments to Controlled Substances Act.

The Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 801 et seq.) is amended—

(1) in section 102(44) (21 U.S.C. 802(44)), by striking “marihuana,”;

(2) in section 401(b) (21 U.S.C. 841(b))—

(A) in paragraph (1)—

(i) in subparagraph (A)—

(I) in clause (vi), by inserting “or” after the semicolon;

(II) by striking (vii); and

(III) by redesignating clause (viii) as clause (vii);

(ii) in subparagraph (B)—

(I) by striking clause (vii); and

(II) by redesignating clause (viii) as clause (vii);

(iii) in subparagraph (C), by striking “subparagraphs (A), (B), and (D)” and inserting “subparagraphs (A) and (B)”;

(iv) by striking subparagraph (D);

(v) by redesignating subparagraph (E) as subparagraph (D); and

(vi) in subparagraph (D)(i), as redesignated, by striking “subparagraphs (C) and (D)” and inserting “subparagraph (C)”;

(B) by striking paragraph (4); and

(C) by redesignating paragraphs (5), (6), and (7) as paragraphs (4), (5), and (6), respectively;

(3) in section 402(c)(2)(B) (21 U.S.C. 842(c)(2)(B)), by striking “, marihuana,”;

(4) in section 403(d)(1) (21 U.S.C. 843(d)(1)), by striking “, marihuana,”;

(5) in section 418(a) (21 U.S.C. 859(a)), by striking the last sentence;

(6) in section 419(a) (21 U.S.C. 860(a)), by striking the last sentence;

(7) in section 422(d) (21 U.S.C. 863(d))—

(A) in the matter preceding paragraph (1), by striking “marijuana,”; and

(B) in paragraph (5), by striking “, such as a marihuana cigarette,”; and

(8) in section 516(d) (21 U.S.C. 886(d)), by striking “section 401(b)(6)” each place the term appears and inserting “section 401(b)(5)”.


All Actions H.R.1227 — 115th Congress (2017-2018)

 

03/16/2017
Referred to the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations.
Action By: House Judiciary

03/03/2017
Referred to the Subcommittee on Health.
Action By: House Energy and Commerce

02/27/2017
Referred to House Judiciary
Action By: House of Representatives

02/27/2017
Referred to House Energy and Commerce
Action By: House of Representatives

02/27/2017
Referred to the Committee on Energy and Commerce, and in addition to the Committee on the Judiciary, for a period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned.
Action By: House of Representatives

02/27/2017
Introduced in House
Action By: House of Representatives


https://www.whitehouse.gov/contact

https://www.whitehouse.gov/contact/write-or-call

https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/house-bill/1227/all-actions

https://www.congress.gov/115/bills/hr1227/BILLS-115hr1227ih.pdf

https://www.congress.gov/115/bills/hr1227/BILLS-115hr1227ih.xml

Additional LINKS of Information:

http://www.constitutionalcannabis.com/kentucky-house–senate-action-alerts.html

https://www.facebook.com/Kentucky-House-Senate-Action-Alerts-133526500152199/

Examining West Virginia’s Medical Marijuana Law


FILE - This April 15, 2017 file photo shows marijuana plants for sale at the ShowGrow dispensary a medical marijuana provider in downtown Los Angeles. This year is poised to be a big one for legalized marijuana, with California and other states that recently approved recreational pot coming online. Yet uncertainty over the Trump administration's intents toward pot enforcement has created at least partial paralysis in those states on public consumption, licensing and other issues. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel,File)

 

WHEELING — Medical marijuana is on its way to West Virginia, although it will be more than two years before it arrives and doctors may start prescribing it for patients.

A bill legalizing the use of medical cannibis has been signed into law by Gov. Jim Justice, but the drug won’t be available to users until July 2019. That’s when a newly created West Virginia Bureau of Health starts to issue patient identification cards to those with ailments meeting qualifications for use.

Patients will be charged $50 for the identification card, but the charge can be waived under instances of financial hardship.

The cannabis prescribed to qualifying patients won’t come in a leaf form that can be smoked or ingested. Instead, users will receive the drug in the form pills, oils, gels, creams, ointments, tinctures, liquid and non-whole plant forms for administration through vaporization.

And the final version of the medical marijuana legislation approved by the West Virginia Legislature prohibits the home cultivation of marijuana by medical cannabis users.

Under the law, the West Virginia Bureau of Public Health may issue as many as 10 permits to businesses seeking to be growers of medical marijuana; as many as 10 permits to those wishing to be processors of the cannabis; and as many as 30 dispensary permits. Medical marijuana will be considered as a medical drug by the state, and its users will not have to pay sales tax when purchasing it. There will, however, be a 10-percent tax on sales from growers/processors to dispensaries.

West Virginia is the 29th state to pass a medical marijuana law, and it joins a growing trend among states thought of as having conservative, traditional values, according to information provided by the Marijuana Policy Project.

During the past year, six states have approved medical cannabis legislation, with West Virginia and neighboring Ohio and Pennsylvania passing their measures through Republican legislatures. Arkansas, Florida, and North Dakota are the others who have new medical marijuana laws, and all six states voted for President Donald Trump last year.

Medical Benefits

Tetrahydrocannabino, commonly known as THC, is the chemical compound in marijuana found to have medicinal benefits in treating chronic pain resulting from migraines, cancer treatment or glaucoma.

It also has been prescribed for muscle spasms caused by multiple sclerosis, epilepsy and seizures, and Crohn’s disease.

Delegate Mark Zatezalo, R-Hancock, pushed in the House for passage of the medical marijuana bill. He assisted House Judiciary Committee Chairman John Shott, R-Mercer, in crafting a reworked version of the legislation first passed in the Senate.

The Shott-Zatezalo amendment offered as replacement legislation made it illegal to dispense marijuana in dry leaf or plant form to a patient, and directed that medicines from marijuana come in the form of patches, pills or potions.

The Shott-Zatezalo version of the legislation was ultimately passed by the Legislature and signed into law.

Zatezalo said he had consulted his daughter, Jennifer, a doctor at Penn State Health Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, on the matter. She confirmed medical cannabis is sometimes prescribed at the center and other hospitals for chronic pain.

“I have no reason to doubt them … ,” Zatezalo said. “But I wanted to craft a better bill. I thought the one we had was loosely written. … What we came up with gave people what they needed medically. It is a little more controlled, with the Bureau of (Public) Health having oversight. There are people out there hurting, and the evidence is mounting that it has medical value.”

Sen. Mike Maroney, R-Wetzel, a medical doctor, was among those voting against medical marijuana legislation. He did not return messages seeking comment.

Legal Questions

Also voting against the medical marijuana legislation in West Virginia was Sen. Ryan Weld, R-Brooke, who also serves as an assistant prosecutor prosecuting drug crimes.

“The reason I voted against it had nothing to do with my being an assistant prosecutor,” he said. “I just know it (marijuana usage) is still illegal per the federal government. I know they stopped enforcing the law during the Obama administration. … But if the federal government wanted to make it illegal again tomorrow, there would be a lot of people running afoul of the law, and a lot of legal consequences.”

Weld cited the “supremacy clause” in the U.S. Constitution which gives federal laws supremacy over those passed by states.

Questions about the law were posed to the office of West Virginia Attorney General Patrick Morrisey.

“At this time, we are reviewing the new law and any legal issues that may arise for the State of West Virginia,” said Curtis Johnson, press secretary for Morrisey.

Medical marijuana legislation was supported by Delegate Shawn Fluharty, D-Ohio, also an attorney.

“The feds have made it clear they will not pursue states that have legalized medical marijuana,” he said. “In fact, the recent budget in Congress did not allocate a single dollar to allow Attorney General Jeff Sessions to target those states.”

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Trudeau’s Legal Marijuana Could Produce A Problem At Border


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Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s plans to legalize marijuana could make for longer lines at the U.S. border. Former U.S. ambassador to Canada Bruce Heyman thinks legal pot in Canada — illegal in the U.S. — could mean more searches with dogs trained to detect cannabis in vehicles.

Heyman, an appointee of former president Barack Obama, told CTV News that he was tasked with examining the potential effect of legalized marijuana on border security while he was ambassador from April 2014 until the inauguration of President Donald Trump in January. He specifically noted the role of sniffer dogs in the detection process.

“The dogs are trained to have reactions to certain scents. Some of those scents start with marijuana. Others are something that are significantly more challenging for the border. But the dog doesn’t tell you this is marijuana and this is an explosive,” Heyman said.

“The dog reacts, and these border guards are going to have to appropriately do an investigation. That could slow the border down.”

Heyman noted that once the dogs are trained to detect the presence of marijuana it is a skill that stays with them for life. So new dogs would have to be introduced.

Heyman noted that longer line-ups as a result of slower security checks would have a ripple effect on trade as it would be more time-consuming, costly and aggravating to move products and produce across the border. He said that is just one more variable to influence the renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) that Trump apparently thought he could unilaterally dismantle without first consulting Congress.

“He’s threatened all throughout the campaign that he was going to tear up NAFTA,” said Heyman. “That was a very clear and repetitive dialogue that he’s had all through the campaign. It was only at one day, at one time, where he used the word tweak… So I think that was the exception, the tweak, rather than what was being consistently communicated.”

Heyman remains optimistic about overall U.S.-Canadian relations despite the increasing volume of the trade threats.

“I don’t think the differences are any bigger now than they were before. I think the language being used is different now,” he said.

Canadian Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale says the federal government is aware of the potential for longer waits at border crossings as a consequence of legal pot.

Responding to questions from CTV News, Goodale press secretary Scott Bardsley said a secure but flexible border remains vital to trade because “400,000 people and $2.4 billion in trade cross our shared border every day. Both countries recognize the importance of an efficient and secure border for our shared prosperity.”

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