Tag Archives: repeal

Abolish the Drug Czar’s Office!


NORML
04/14/2017

 

The Trump Administration is widely expected to pick Representative Tom Marino for Drug Czar.

Representative Marino is a longtime, rabid drug warrior who has a consistent record of voting against marijuana law reform legislation — a position that runs counter to that of the majority of voters and his own constituents. His appointment to this office highlights the fact that this administration remains committed to the failed 1980s ‘war on drug’ playbook.

The Trump administration promised to eliminate bureaucratic waste. It should start by eliminating the office of the Drug Czar. 

The White House Drug Czar is required, by statute, “to oppose any attempt to legalize the use of a substance that is listed in Schedule I” and to “ensure that no Federal funds … shall be expended for any study or contract relating to the legalization (for a medical use or any other use) of a substance listed in Schedule I.” This narrow-minded, Flat Earth mentality refuses to acknowledge the reality that the majority of the country is now authorized to engage in the use of medical cannabis and it mandates that US drug policy be dictated by rhetoric and ideology rather than by science and evidence.

NORML opposes Marino’s appointment to Drug Czar and we further call for this anti-science position to be abolished entirely.

Click here to send a message to President Trump – End the charade of the Drug Czar by abolishing the position. 

The Drug Czar’s office is a remnant of a bygone era when US drug policy was framed as a ‘war’ fueled largely by rhetoric and ideology. In 2017 we can do better and we must. The majority of Americans view drug abuse as a public health issue, they favor regulating cannabis as opposed to criminalizing it, and they are demanding policy changes based on science and evidence.

Tell President Trump: There is no place for ‘Czars’ in today’s American government, particularly those like Marino who still cling to the outdated and failed drug war policies and misplaced ideologies of the past.

Thanks in advance for standing together with the thousands of NORML members throughout the country.

The NORML Team

P.S. Our work is supported by thousands of people throughout the country as we work to advance marijuana reform in all 50 states and at the federal level. Can you kick in $5, $10 or $20 a month to help us keep going?

 

 

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In chaotic scene, Rand Paul demands to see the House GOP’s Obamacare repeal bill


By Lauren Fox and Phil Mattingly, CNN

Updated 3:25 PM ET, Thu March 2, 2017

Rand Paul 3.2.17

Senator demands to see ‘secret’ Obamacare bill 01:59

Story highlights
  • Some House Republicans were being granted a chance to review an Obamacare repeal draft
  • GOP leadership has taken a new level of caution with their Obamacare legislation

(CNN)  Kentucky Republican Sen. Rand Paul marched to the House side of the Capitol Thursday morning, knocked on a locked door and demanded to see a copy of the House’s bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, which he believed was being kept under lock and key.

Aides in the room told the senator — before dozens of reporters in a crowded hallway — that there was no bill to see. In fact, it wasn’t the room where GOP members of the Energy and Commerce Committee were told to meet with staff to review the current draft of their bill at all. But that did little to dissuade Paul, openly critical to the House Republican leadership’s preferred path on the process, from making his underlying point.

“This should be an open and transparent process,” Paul said. “This is being presented as if it were a national secret, as if this was a plot to invade another country, as if this were national security. That’s wrong.”

    Paul ventured to the House Thursday afternoon after reports surfaced that House Republicans on the Energy and Commerce Committee were being granted an opportunity to review the current draft of the Obamacare repeal legislation and ask questions behind closed doors.

    Opposed to the House legislation’s principles, Paul said he wanted to see the bill himself even though he didn’t serve on the committee.

    “I’m not allowed to read the working product so I can comment on it?” he said.

    Outside the small House office, the chaotic scene continued with a handful of Democrats demanding they, too, see the legislation, which aides continued to say was not even in the room. Two Democrats on the Energy and Commerce Committee and House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer, a Democrat from Maryland, asked aides if the bill was ready, only to be rebuffed.

    “I want to see the bill. I want to read the bill,” New York Democrat Paul Tonko said, noting that as far as he knew, Republicans were still planning to move forward with a markup on the legislation next week.

    At one point, the GOP staff allowed Hoyer, Rep. Joe Kennedy and a dozen or so reporters into the room to inspect it themselves. It was, in fact, bill-less.

    Hoyer proceeded to hold an impromptu news conference near a bust of President Abraham Lincoln a few feet away from the misidentified room. He then held an imaginary conversation with the 16th president about what Hoyer said was the poor state of the Republican Party.

    Rep. Greg Walden, the chairman of the Energy and Commerce Committee, downplayed perceptions of secrecy in a statement Thursday.

    “Reports that the Energy and Commerce Committee is doing anything other than the regular process of keeping its members up to speed on latest developments in its jurisdictions are false. Simply put, Energy and Commerce majority members and staff are continuing to discuss and refine draft legislative language on issues under our committee’s jurisdiction.”

    Leadership has taken a new level of caution with Obamacare repeal and replace reconciliation drafts after a leaked version of the bill in progress was circulated to news outlets last week.

    House aides told CNN that the review process was simply part of regular procedure of giving their members an opportunity to review the current draft and ask committee staff questions. The committee — along with a second panel responsible for the repeal legislation — is tentatively shooting to consider their respective pieces of legislation as soon as next week.

    The leaked draft — which aides say was outdated — drew condemnations from conservatives who pledged to oppose any final bill and set off a new round of internal divisions that threatened to endanger the repeal process before it even gets off the ground.

    CONTINUE READING AND TO VIDEO…

    How prohibition limits cannabis & technology


    Published on February 7, 2017

    Travis Lachner

    Travis Lachner
    CEO & Creative Director at Cannvas

     

    Federal prohibition segregates cannabis and technology.

    Complex banking regulation suffocates cash flow.

    Research discoveries are suppressed and hidden.

    Social media shutdowns are routine procedure.

    Simply stated; making progress in the cannabis industry is really difficult right now.

    This professional canna-bigotry is due to marijuana’s (mis)classification as a Schedule I substance. Domestic and international companies

    Most of the country supports cannabis legalization. Yet, it still remains illegal.

    Prohibition causes unnecessary and inefficient problems for the industry – and the nation.

    We need to end prohibition and build the industry right to realize the potential of cannabis.

    Companies, consumers, patients, and citizens will all benefit from proper legalization.

    1) Banking and FinTech access sucks. Cash-only operations are unsafe.

    Cannabis companies cannot access basic banking and financial technologies normally.

    Federal prohibition restricts most banks from serving companies related to cannabis in any way. Even ancillary companies (that don’t touch the plant) are still neglected.

    And legislative progress for cannabis banking created at the state level is stomped out by federal government.

    In Colorado, state banking officials approved a charter for the first “Cannabis Bank” ever – A credit union named The Fourth Corner (TFCCU).

    However, final admin approval at the federal level is continuously denied… The cannabis bank cannot operate without it.

    Financial restrictions force cannabis companies two directions:

    • Option A – Companies operate cash only. Sometimes moving hundreds of thousands of dollars at a time.
    • Option B – Companies pursue private banking opportunities at the state level and operate within financial loopholes.

    Neither of these options are ideal.

    According to Bloomberg Business, less than 3% of banks in America accept cannabis cash. Which means employees and individuals must move billions of dollars in cash regularly. These are extremely unsafe conditions and procedures.

    A new “cannabis security” industry is emerging because of this problem. Ventures like Canna Security America provide comprehensive security services to keep staff, customers, and citizens safe.

    But cannabis companies shouldn’t have to hire armed security services for safety… If customers were allowed to just swipe a damn debit card at any dispensary, the context of cannabis will be safer.

    Modern banking technology is essential to all modern companies. Why are cannabis companies forced into awkward and unsafe restrictions?

    It is unrealistic to make companies to operate under such irrational conditions. Especially while being taxed so heavily.

    2) Awkward and vague regulations change often.

    Cannabis companies pour capital into compliance. The “cover your ass” attitude is necessary in the ever-shifting regulations and requirements.

    Brands balance between state legality and federal prohibition. New laws can make, break, or change business models overnight.

    In addition to operational regulation, cannabis companies must abide to marketing and advertising restrictions. They cannot reach audiences like most other businesses.

    Traditional companies in America spend millions on marketing and advertising – with minimal restrictions. TV, Facebook, Google, Instagram – pretty much whatever they want. But cannabis related companies can’t participate. (Yet.)

    Instead, cannabis companies navigate complex layers of ambiguous regulation. Many areas of requirements are unclear, unrealistic, or nonexistent.

    Large companies like Google and Facebook restrict ads for anything and everything cannabis-related.

    And to be fair, they are just protecting their companies. Most of these policies are indirectly due to federal prohibition.

    National brands fear the possible repercussions of the federal government. So they cover their ass by following suit with whatever the government says at the time.

    This creates a contradicting scenario for companies and states… Selling cannabis is legal – but advertising cannabis is tricky.

    Beyond regulation, cannabis companies are often pushed around by the “big boys” of media and technology.

    I see new stories like those every week. It’s seriously like industrial level bigotry or bullying.

    3) Research and development efforts are limited and discouraged.

    Cannabis companies cannot complete high-level research and development.

    Innovation research and medical studies require strict government approval or federal funding – which is often denied.

    But here’s the weird part. The federal government already knows cannabis research will benefit society… The federal government owns the patent to use cannabinoids as antioxidants and neuroprotectants. Yet, they still suppress innovative discoveries.

    Back in the 70’s, the US government discovered THC can shrink cancerous tumors. But political forces swept this research under the rug.

    Why? Because it did not support the agenda for “The War on Drugs.”

    Modern research reinforced the discovery again in 2000.

    Spanish scientists successfully destroyed “uncurable” brain tumors with THC (an active component of cannabis).

    But you probably didn’t see this story in America. That’s because the revolutionary research was censored and ignored by major media outlets.

    The neglected study from Madrid was named the “Top Censored Story” of 2000 by Project Censored

    Today, American government is still putting up roadblocks for research.

    In 2015, Congress shut down federal research on medical marijuana yet again.

    This is an absurd problem. Is our own government suppressing the potential power of cannabis intentionally?

    The medical benefits of cannabis and technology deserve to be discovered and delivered to the people.

    Let’s take a closer look at the potential of marrying cannabis and technology.

    Throughout history, technology innovations pave the path for industries to leverage and build upon.

    But unfortunately, cannabis companies are restricted from leveraging existing technologies.

    While most American companies sit on the shoulders of giants, cannabis companies barely get to stand on on the big toe of that giant.

    Even worse – companies that “touch the plant” are restricted by regulations and fear of prosecution. Which means new innovations in the industry are often discouraged or dismissed.

    This type of environment creates irrational risk for entrepreneurs, researchers, and innovators. It discourages progress and big ideas..

    Instead, we must cultivate an environment for encouraging positive growth and development.

    Imagine what we will gain when the cannabis industry can leverage the entire spectrum of modern technologies with less restriction.

    1) Companies will focus on improving products and services.

    Cannabis companies will devote more time and energy to optimize the customer experience. Products and services will be fixed, upgraded, and optimized over time.

    Currently, cannabis companies spend TONS of time, money, and energy navigating a shit-show of regulations and compliance.

    Intense, time-consuming administrative projects ensure the entire business isn’t stripped away.

    This energy could be (and should be) spent better.

    Internal resources should be used to enhance product development, improve services, and innovate the customer experience.

    Cannabis companies deserve the right to allocate their bandwidth more efficiently.

    2) Companies will mature their marketing (and targeting).

    Marketing and advertising will experience noticeable maturity. Companies will focus on more specific target audiences with hyper-detailed precision.

    Cannabis companies will target consumers and patients better.

    From stereotypical “stoners” to critically concerned medical patients… Proper access to modern marketing and targeting technology will enhance the customer experience.

    Customer archetypes, strain-matching, and advanced targeting tools will be standard in the industry. Apps like PotBot will offer custom product recommendations based on user preferences.

    Technology allows brands to target the exact type of users best-fit for their product. In the end, that is better for both the consumers and the companies.

    But most technologies will be inaccessible or restricted until prohibition is lifted.

    Federal prohibition sets the tone for large companies and advertising platforms to follow suit regarding cannabis. And the current advertising restrictions make it extremely difficult for companies to capture targeted audiences.

    Cannabis pioneers experience difficulty building and marketing effective, creative and compliant campaigns.

    If this problem sounds familiar… Cannvas provides custom cannabis brand-building solutions for 100% compliant marketing, advertising, and PR.

    3) Research will unlock the power of the endocannabinoid system.

    This is the big kahuna.

    The endocannabinoid system is the untapped holy grail of cannabis and medicine.

    It could be one the missing key needed to treat, manage, or cure many conditions in the medical community.

    The endocannabinoid system is revolutionary. But we are only in the early stages of discovery. Many experts predict mastering the ECS will mark a new era of healthcare.

    From cancer, to epilepsy, to simple chronic pain or nausea… The endocannabinoid system is directly related to the biological balance of humans.

    Currently, we are just scratching the surface of possibilities. But the convergence of cannabis and medical technology is well under way.

    With proper funding, and federal approval, hundreds of medical benefits will be discovered. The full potential of can be literally life-saving.

    Cannabis will soon develop its identity as a wellness product.

    And canna-pharmaceuticals may be the future of healthcare.

    The solution is simple.

    Federal prohibition is ineffective. We need to marry cannabis and modern technologies.

    Nationwide legalization will enable better access to existing technologies – while encouraging innovation and safety.

    Companies, consumers, and citizens will all benefit from legalizing cannabis.

    And we can build the industry right.

    Let’s do this.

    North Americans Spent $53.3 Billion On Marijuana Last Year, Most Of It Illegally


    The industry “just needs to move demand for an already widely-popular product into legal channels,” a new report says.

    01/17/2017 06:20 pm ET

    Ryan Grenoble Reporter, The Huffington Post

    A new report estimates consumers spent $53.3 billion on cannabis in North America last year.

    The first-of-its-kind analysis, compiled by ArcView Market Research, spans legal, medical and illegal marijuana markets across both the United States and Canada. At around $46 billion, the illegal market constituted 87 percent of marijuana sales in 2016 (a decrease from 90 percent in 2015), dwarfing both medical and legal sales.

    The marijuana investment and research firm provided a 25-page executive summary of its fifth annual State of Legal Marijuana Markets to The Huffington Post Tuesday, ahead of the full report’s release in February.

    Arcview projects the legal marijuana market will expand from its current $6.9 billion to $21.6 billion by 2021, as California, Massachusetts and Canada expand their cannabis sales, and medical sales begin in Florida. The $6.9 billion figure is itself a 34 percent increase in just one year from 2015.

    Assuming the projections hold, the five-year growth rate for legal marijuana from 2016 to 2021 would fall just short of that seen by broadband internet providers from 2002 through 2007, which expanded at around 29 percent per year, from around $7 billion to north of $25 billion.

    Unlike most of the billion-dollar industries that preceded it, marijuana is in a unique position, ArcView argues, because the market doesn’t need to be created from scratch ― it just needs to transition from illicit to legal channels.

    “The enormous amount of existing, if illicit, consumer spending sets cannabis apart from most other major consumer-market investment opportunities throughout history,” Arcview Market Research CEO Troy Dayton explained in an emailed statement.

    “In contrast to comparable markets with fast growth from zero to tens of billions in recent decades such as organic foods, home video, mobile, or the internet, the cannabis industry doesn’t need to create demand for a new product or innovation ― it just needs to move demand for an already widely-popular product into legal channels.”

    In states that have moved to tax and regulate the drug, the black market has decreased rapidly, the report found. Colorado’s black market, for instance, accounts for about one-third of all cannabis sales, with the majority having transitioned to legal marketplaces.

    ArcView found the cashflow going to drug dealers and cartels has diminished accordingly, helped in part by the shrinking “illegality premium” for the product once demanded by the black market. 

    CONTINUE READING…

    Trump’s marijuana options


     

    marijuana

    By Beau Kilmer – 01/17/17 01:30 PM ES

    Finally, there appears to be a serious federal discussion about marijuana legalization. But it’s nowhere near the Beltway.

    Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s marijuana task force recently released a landmark report about legalizing and regulating the drug in Canada. Advocates on all sides will find something to disagree with in the report, but that’s the point. Canada’s federal government is kicking off a meaningful discussion about this complex and controversial topic.

    This is far different from the U.S. federal approach.

    The Obama administration has largely taken a hands-off approach, releasing a 2013 Department of Justice memo indicating that federal prosecutors and law enforcement agents should not use scarce resources to shut down state-legal operations in places that have “implemented strong and effective regulatory and enforcement systems.” To the Obama administration’s credit, the president did recently note marijuana legalization is “a debate that is now ripe” and the director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse called for more research to determine which “policy structures—beyond simply prohibition or free market—are most likely to keep harms to a minimum.”

    No one knows what the Trump administration will do about marijuana, and Sen. Jeff Sessions’ confirmation hearing for attorney general didn’t provide much insight. Will it follow Obama’s lead? Trudeau’s? Do something entirely different? The new administration will have at least six options.

    Shut it down. The administration could crack down on marijuana businesses in states that have legalized for nonmedical purposes. It would be easy for DOJ to send out “cease and desist” letters to these companies and their landlords. However, there could be serious political costs with states arguing these federal actions would put people out of jobs, increase income for criminals and take tax dollars away from good causes.

    Shape the markets. The DOJ could use its discretion to shape what the market looks like in the legalization states. Want to stop stores from selling and promoting high-potency products for nonmedical purposes? A letter could probably do the trick here, too. If not, seizing the products in a store or two could have a chilling effect.

    Maintain the status quo. Doing nothing—and sticking with Obama’s approach—is always an option. This would likely lead more states to follow Colorado and Washington and grant licenses to marijuana companies incentivized to maximize profits instead of protecting public health.

    Reclassify marijuana. The new administration could support rescheduling marijuana. Currently, marijuana is a Schedule I drug—the most restrictive category—because the Food and Drug Administration remains unconvinced that the whole plant material has an accepted medical use. Rescheduling would make it easier to research the health consequences—benefits and harms—and could have implications for marijuana businesses.

    Address federal-state conflicts. The new administration could maintain federal prohibition while supporting legislation or other solutions to address problems caused by the federal-state conflict. For example, banks that accept money from state-legal marijuana businesses are committing federal offenses. The inability to bank like other entities creates challenges for thousands of companies. 

    The administration could also support the creation of a policy waiver system that would make it easier and less risky for states to legally experiment with alternatives to the profit-maximization model, such as the state monopoly approach. (That said, the risk of federal interference hasn’t stopped tiny North Bonneville in southern Washington state from creating a government-owned and -operated store).

    Legalize it. The administration could support legislation to legalize and regulate marijuana at the federal level. This would address the federal-state conflicts and allow the feds to impose a national tax or minimum price. It would also be a blatant violation of the international drug conventions that the United States has signed along with almost every other nation on earth (including Canada).

    These six options are not all mutually exclusive and each comes with tradeoffs. Importantly, they are all compatible with a federal approach that encourages and supports discussions about marijuana prohibition and its alternatives. But if the feds don’t act, it is possible the United States could end up with a much looser and more commercial marijuana model than if the federal government legalized or created a waiver system.

    With one-fifth of the U.S. population living in states that have legalized, the federal-state conflict over marijuana will likely only get more intense. Those in the Beltway who want to address the situation would be wise to familiarize themselves with the pros and cons of these six options—and pay attention to the discussions taking place in Canada.

    Beau Kilmer is co-director of the RAND Drug Policy Research Center and co-author of the recently revised book Marijuana Legalization: What Everyone Needs to Know

    CONTINUE READING…

    This may be the ultimate indictment of the "moneyed" drug reform movement in this country and I urge you to distribute this article as widely as possible


    (The following article is posted from a website that I happened to come across today while looking for information on the “MERRP Model” for RE-Legalization.  I decided to repost it because I think the opinion that is offered needs to be heard and RE-Legalization vs. Legal-Lies or “Legalize” has to be made known.  SK)

    Image may contain: 1 person, text

    (1) Introduction
    This may be the ultimate indictment of the “moneyed” drug reform movement in this country and I urge you to distribute this article as widely as possible.
    This is the 8th in a series of essays on the MERP Model for Re-Legalizing Marijuana throughout the planet.  In this essay I am exposing the “smoking gun” evidence that will show that the “Marijuana Policy Project” (MPP) is secretively plotting to put an end to the personal cultivation of Marijuana which has been a perennial goal of all Marijuana activists since the mid-1960’s.  This betrayal, of both Cannabis activists and the MERP Model, requires that MPP is cut off from any further activist funding.  You will find links to all past and future essays, concerning “MERP” at the following link:
    (2) Some Brief Background on the Re-Legalization Movement from the 1960’s through 2008
    1967 was the year that the first major petition, demanding Marijuana Re-Legalization, was placed in the London Times by Paul McCartney.  Here is a brief description of the petition from Barry Miles “Beatles Diary:”
    The “Pot” Ad
    The Times ran a full page advertisement on July 24th, 1967, headed, “The law against marijuana is immoral in principle and unworkable in practice” which was signed by, among other, all four Beatles and Brian Epstein. The petition’s arguments included the following: that the smoking of cannabis on private premises should no longer constitute an offence; cannabis should be taken off the dangerous drugs list and controlled, rather than prohibited; possession of cannabis should either be legally permitted or at most be considered a misdemeanor and that all person now imprisoned for possession of cannabis or for allowing cannabis to be smoke on private premises should have their sentences commuted.
    It was signed by 65 eminent names including Francis Crick, the co-discoverer of the DNA molecule and a Nobel laureate, novelist Graham Greene, and MPs Brian Walden and Rom Drilberg, as well as future MP Jonathan Aitkin, but the four MBEs caused the most press concern. Questions were asked in the House, and a chain of events set off, which did actually result in the liberalization of the laws against pot in Britain. the advertisement was paid for by the Beatles at Paul McCartney’s instigation.
    The Beatles Diary: The Beatles years By Barry Miles
    Four years later (1971) another Beatle, John Lennon, came to the assistance of Michigan activist John Sinclair, who had been put in prison for 10 years for getting arrested with a mere 2 Marijuana cigarettes.  Recently John Sinclair became the most important luminary to join the roster of activists supporting the MERP Model for Marijuana Re-Legalization.  And the list of supporters is growing by the day.
    So for nearly 42 years we have now been fighting to end the prohibition of Marijuana throughout this planet.  Am I the only one that is angered that we have not yet achieved this goal?   Think about it.  It only took 13 years to realize that Alcohol Prohibition was a mistake, despite it being a far more dangerous drug than Marijuana.  Yet it has now been 71 years, that we have endured Marijuana Prohibition, and despite 52% support nationwide (see Zogby Poll), our representatives continue to ignore us.
    Despite numerous feeble attempts it was not until 1996 — 29 years later — that the first Medical Marijuana Initiative, Proposition 215, was passed in California.  George Soros was a major contributor to Prop 215 but, according to activist Ron Kiczenski, he was not able to have much input into the structure of this initiative which had no limits to the number of plants that a patient could grow. Proposition 215 also held the counties responsible for granting citizens access to “Medical Marijuana.”
    For the uninitiated here is what you should know about George Soros:
    (1) He is the primary funding source for the Drug Policy Alliance (DPA) headed by Ethan Nadleman and the Marijuana Policy Project (MPP) headed by Rob Kampia.
    (2) He has been the primary source of funding for the remaining 12 Medical Marijuana initiatives that have passed through 2008.
    (3) He is a ruthless Globalist who supports gun control, open borders and is also a primary funding source to dozens of drug reform organizations throughout the planet.
    (4) It is becoming clearer, by the day, that Soros is positioning himself to profit from a highly “taxed and regulated” Marijuana industry that will not destroy the drug cartels or stop the arrest of American Cannabis consumers.
    So it is not a big surprise that Soros funded California Senate Bill 420 (SB 420), after Prop 215 passed.  This was Soros’s attempt to limit the number of plants that a patient could grow.  Fortunately the Californian Appeals Court found SB420 unconstitutional because it did attempt to set limits.
    Undeterred Soros became the primary funding source for the remaining 12 Medical Marijuana Initiatives which culminated in the passage of the Michigan Initiative in November 2008.  But the clever little Soros made sure that most of the remaining 12 initiatives  were restricted to a 12 Plant limit for the Medical Patient or the Caregiver.
    This concludes my brief summary of Soros activities through 2008.  It should also be clear that Soros has shown absolutely no inclination to support initiatives that allow personal cultivation for healthy Cannabis consumers.  In fact Ethan Nadleman would not allow me access to Soros when I attempted to garner more funding for the Michigan Personal Marijuana Initiative (PRA) in July 2001.  We had collected over 270,000 signatures and needed additional funding to bring in professional canvassers to get the remaining 180,000 signatures.  But Nadleman and Soros “just said no” and the initiative never made the ballot.
    (3) How Obama, Soros, Rob Kampia and MPP Intend To Betray the Marijuana Re-Legalization Movement in 2009
    In a recent email from MPP they talk about the pending AZ Medical Marijuana Initiative:
    “What’s unique about the Arizona law is that it would permit qualifying patients or their caregivers to legally purchase marijuana from licensed dispensaries — so they wouldn’t need to obtain it from the criminal market”.
    Once you understand what Kampia (MPP) is really hiding you will have every right to get pissed off. You see, under this initiative (should it pass), you will NOT be able to cultivate the common 12 Plant maximum unless you live more than 25 miles from a licensed dispensary.
    Here is what Rob Kampia and Soros did not want the Cannabis Activist Community to understand:
    “Qualifying patients who live more than 25 miles from the nearest dispensary will be allowed to cultivate up to 12 marijuana plants for personal use.”
    In other words, once there are enough dispensaries individual consumers will no longer be able to cultivate their own Marijuana!
    So the only thing “unique” about Rob Kampia’s (President of MPP) AZ initiative is that it will basically prohibit personal cultivation as soon as Soros can set up his network of “Medical Marijuana Dispensaries.”. On that count alone I urge everyone in AZ to reject this flawed initiative and stop supporting MPP or DPA.
    I have not assembled all of the puzzle pieces here but certainly enough to make the case that Soros, Kampia and Nadleman are not honest brokers of the drug policy reform that most Americans would like to see.  untaxed, unregulated cultivation by all American Citizens over the age of 18.
    It is also becoming clear that the media is slowly attempting to “manufacture consent” for a highly regulated “tax and regulate” model for Marijuana Re-Legalization that will force American Citizens to pay exorbitant prices for Marijuana (e.g., $300 to $500 and ounce) in order to feed the tax coffers of local, state and federal government.  Why would we want to allow this when the MERP Model would allow you to grow for free outside or for about $30 and ounce if grown indoors under lamps.
    A fellow activist also made the astute observation that Obama is most probably also in on this betrayal.  Just consider the following excerpt from a recent Christian Science Monitor article on this subject:
    “Several recent polls show stepped-up public support for legalization. This means not only lifting restrictions on use (“decriminalization”), but also on supply – production and sales. The Obama administration, meanwhile, says the US Drug Enforcement Agency will no longer raid dispensaries of medical marijuana – which is illegal under federal law – in states where it is legal.”
    Legalize marijuana? Not so fast.
    This is how she put it after we discussed the flawed AZ initiative in some detail:
    “This is why MPP wants to put the power and control of med pot distribution and sales into dispensaries. and take it out of the hands of the patients. Do the dispensaries now become the care giver/grower as well?  How many plants are they allowed to grow?  Dispensaries will be popping up like convenience stores if that is the case.  I see a whole new set of laws coming under corporate oversight and it’s screaming MONSANTO/DUPONT GENETIC PATENT ON SEED AND PLANT DISPENSARY CONTROL. What a set up…Obama said he won’t raid “DISPENSARIES” in states where medical marijuana is legal…that is why they are taking the power away from home growers/patients…These dispensaries will fall under federal laws….and more than likely federal control and regulation.  Sneaky, sneaky.”
    This is exactly what I have been warning people about for years regarding the major drug reform groups supported by George Soros. Marijuana Policy Project (MPP) and Drug Policy Alliance (DPA) are two of the greatest beneficiaries of Soros funds. But Soros funds dozens of groups throughout the United States and dozens more outside of the United States .

    As an activist in drug reform for over 20 years my goal has always been to change the laws so that ALL American adults, not just the sick, would be able to consume and cultivate their own Marijuana.  And under the MERP Model we will be able to do this just like we are currently able to produce our own homemade beer and wine: without any taxation, regulation or government interference. To that end I have come up with the MERP Model and have produced a series of essays and videos to explain how it would be implemented:
    It is bad enough that Soros is moving to “cash in” on Medical Marijuana by prohibiting personal cultivation. What is worse is that such initiatives will do nothing to destroy the Drug Cartels, Terrorist Organizations and Gangs that profit from the illicit sale of Marijuana. The only model that would assure this outcome is the MERP Model, because it would essentially take all but the normal profit out of the Marijuana market.
    For most goods the “normal profit” is usually about twice the cost of producing the product. So in the case of Marijuana you can grow it for about 20 to 30 dollars per ounce using the latest hydroponic techniques and High Intensity Discharge lamps. So you would expect the “normal profit” to be somewhere between $40 to $60 dollars an ounce. But the MPP Arizona initiative would do nothing to eliminate the “black marketing” of Marijuana where an ounce will still sell from between $300 and $600 an ounce. In such a setting the Medical Dispensaries, Terrorists, Mexican Drug Cartels etc. will continue to thrive at our expense.
    (4) Summary
    By looking retrospectively at the the activities of Soros it is clear that he is against any form of personal cultivation and more than likely expects to profit handsomely from a highly “taxed and regulated” system of drug reform.  It is also clear that Obama and the Corporate Media are also on board to manufacture consent for such a stupid and short sighted model.
    But from the Hippies of the 60’s, to the Activists of the New Millennium, we have always wanted full rights to cultivate Mother Nature’s plant without the encumbrances of taxes, regulations or other excuses for the government to invade our homes and properties.  As far as I’m concerned Soros, Kampia and Nadleman can go “nadle” one another.  We have uncovered their deception and we will no longer support their flawed plans to control both us and our plant.
    I think it is time we stop supporting these Soros-supported organizations and unite to achieve the only solution that will destroy the Cartels and serve the common good: the MERP Model. It already enjoys the support of thousands of activists including some of the most important luminaries of the movement: John Sinclair, Ron Kiczenski and Bruce W. Cain (Editor of New Age Citizen).

     

    SOURCE LINK

    BRUCE CAIN ON FACEBOOK

    THE MERRP MODEL FOR RE-LEGALIATION

    9 States to Vote Soon on Expanding Legal Access to Marijuana


    SAN FRANCISCO — Sep 28, 2016, 2:35 AM ET

    Marijuana National Vote

    From California, with its counterculture heritage, to the fishing ports and mill towns of Maine, millions of Americans in nine states have a chance to vote Nov. 8 on expanding legal access to marijuana. Collectively, the ballot measures amount to the closest the U.S. has come to a national referendum on the drug.

    Five states — Arizona, California, Maine, Massachusetts and Nevada — will consider legalizing the recreational use of pot. Three others — Florida, Arkansas and North Dakota — will decide whether to permit marijuana for medical purposes. Montana will weigh whether to ease restrictions on an existing medical marijuana law.

    As the most populous state, with a reputation for trend-setting, California is attracting the most attention — and money — in an intensifying debate over Proposition 64.

    Silicon Valley tycoons and deep-pocketed donors with connections to the legal medical marijuana industry are among the top financial backers of a pro-pot campaign that has raised almost $17 million. Opponents have raised slightly more than $2 million, including a $1.4 million contribution from retired Pennsylvania art professor Julie Schauer.

    Advocates on both sides say passage in California would likely ignite legalization movements in other states, especially when the tax dollars start adding up. California’s nonpartisan Legislative Analyst’s Office estimated the state could collect up to $1 billion a year in marijuana taxes.

    "As California goes, so goes the nation," said University of California, Berkeley political science professor Alan Ross.

    If "yes" votes prevail across the country, about 75 million people accounting for more than 23 percent of the U.S. population would live in states where recreational pot is legal. The jurisdictions where that’s already the case — Alaska, Colorado, Oregon, Washington state and the District of Columbia — have about 18 million residents, or 5.6 percent of the population. Twenty-five states allow medical marijuana.

    According to national polls, a solid majority of Americans support legalization. Gallup’s latest survey gauged support at 58 percent, up from 12 percent from when the question was first posed in 1969. Gallup says 13 percent of U.S. adults report using marijuana at present, nearly double the percentage who reported using pot in 2013.

    California voters rejected an attempt to legalize recreational marijuana in 2010 after campaign leaders struggled to raise money and support for a four-page ballot measure hastily written by the owner of a small medicinal marijuana store.

    This time, the 62-page ballot measure was crafted by political professionals and has the backing of many elected officials, including Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom, who is running for governor in 2018. Current Gov. Jerry Brown says he’s close to announcing his position.

    The measure would allow people 21 and older to legally possess up to an ounce of weed and grow six marijuana plants at home. Pot sales would be subject to various tax rates that would be deposited into the state’s Marijuana Tax Fund. Most of that money would be spent on substance-abuse education and treatment. Some would be used to repair environmental damage caused by illegal growers.

    Opponents argue that the measure will do more harm than good by opening a marijuana market dominated by small farmers to corporate interests and encouraging children to use the drug through pot-laced sweets like gummy bears, cookies and brownies.

    The proposal "favors the interests of wealthy corporations over the good of the everyday consumer, adopting policies that work against public health," said Kevin Sabet, co-founder of the California-based advocacy group Smart Approaches to Marijuana.

    Napster founder and early Facebook investor Sean Parker has contributed more than $3 million to the legalization effort, which has also attracted sizable contributions from an organization backed by billionaire George Soros and another backed by Weedmaps, which rates pot stores throughout the state.

    "It’s a huge deal and it’s long overdue," said Steven DeAngelo, owner of one of the nation’s largest medicinal marijuana dispensaries and a Proposition 64 supporter.

    In most of the states with marijuana ballot measures, polls have shown the "yes" side leading. Sabet believes opponents of legalization would attract more support if they could narrow a large fundraising gap and spread their cautionary messages. He does not buy the other side’s argument that nationwide legalization will come sooner or later.

    "Repeating that this is inevitable, and repeating they are so excited, is part of their narrative to makes folks like us feel helpless," he said.

    Mason Tvert of the Marijuana Policy Project, a leading pro-legalization group, said his side has a chance to win in most of the nine states, but some losses will not derail the movement.

    "Even if a measure doesn’t pass, support will grow," he said, citing failed ballot measures in Oregon and Colorado that preceded the victories for legalization.

    "Most people believe marijuana should be legal. It’s a question of whether opponents do a good job of scaring them out of doing it now," Tvert added. "We might see people opt to wait a couple more years."

    All five states voting on recreational marijuana have seen intense debate over the effect of legalization in the states that have already taken that step.

    Opponents of the ballot measures make an array of claims, contending, for example, that Colorado’s legalization of pot has coincided with an increase in crime in Denver and fueled a jump in the number of traffic fatalities linked to marijuana use.

    However, an analysis by three academic experts, published this month by the libertarian-leaning Cato Institute, asserted that the impact of legalization has been minimal.

    "The data so far provide little support for the strong claims about legalization made by either opponents or supporters," the analysis said.

    Harvard University economist Jeffrey Miron, one of the co-authors of the study, predicted Californians would approve Proposition 64, but he was less certain of the outcome in his home state of Massachusetts, where the Republican governor, Charlie Baker, and the Democratic mayor of Boston, Marty Walsh, have teamed up to oppose legalization.

    Miron said it’s difficult to predict when legalization might get support in Congress or surge to approval in a majority of states.

    "I’m not sure if this November will get us to the tipping point. It may be two or four more years," he said. "Certain things seem impossible, until all of a sudden they are possible, and they happen fast."

    ———

    Crary reported from New York.

    CONTINUE READING AND TO VIDEO!

    A "repealer’s" opinion on the subject of marijuana "legalization"… (We must REPEAL PROHIBITION of Cannabis and all other plants!)


     
    sheeple
     
    Angalee Jones

    34 mins ·

    By Chris:

    I can’t speak loudly enough or harshly enough against the Fucking Sell Out RATS at groups like NORML, MPP and DPA and their associated allies at various commercial enterprises growing up across the country.
    All of the aforementioned groups are useless and no good for the American Cannabis Consumer.

    They are GREAT for anybody wanting to try to go into business. They are GREAT for the Police, and the Taxman.

    But they represent pure POISON for the ordinary cannabis consumer.

    By focusing efforts on the creation of commercial opportunities instead of civil rights, the aforementioned groups show themselves to be utterly unconcerned with what is the best interest of Cannabis or what is best for it’s consumers.

    They also show themselves to be more interested in creating financial empires than in making pot available to all.

    I have been trying tirelessly for over 40 years to try to ELIMINATE cannabis regulation, with the end result being the ability of allowing the private person to grow smoke and sell their own weed which they grow themselves.

    Unfortunately, the loudest and best financed voices in this effort don’t have this in mind.

    They have in mind owning a series of state licensed and regulated outlets which will both limit production and distribution to a small group of wealthy investors who are seeking to monopolize the markets and prevent the average person from growing their own.

    I have taken a look at how this is working out across the country.

    In states where pot is supposed to be “Legalized”, it is still illegal to grow your own unless you have a special permission to do so from the police.
    This is the exact opposite of what I wanted when I first started putting on Smoke In’s back in the early eighties.
    But it fits in just FINE with what SCOTT Inc wants.

     
    I cannot adequately describe my utter despair over what has happened.

    I blame the people at NORML for this. For creating an atmosphere of privilege and entitlement instead of creating an environment of equality and access.
    For trying to create private commercial empires instead of making medicine available to those who need it with a minimum of cost instead of being squeezed for exorbitant prices upwards of $30.00 a gram.
    What is happening is more like extortion and price gouging instead of easy access and affordability.
    The whole lot of asshole ripoff artists who bleat “Legalize” like a pack of sheep instead of trying to get rid of this evil unwanted law, and EVIL THOUGHTLESS CRIMINALS who are bent on creating a corporatized monopoly of limited access and higher prices need to be punished.
    They have done personal freedom and universal access a grave injury.
    They are DIRECTLY RESPONSIBLE for making the counterculture revolution that was starting to grow in my youth FAIL.

    Shame on Keith Stroop. Shame on Ethan Nadelman. Shame on Rob Kampia.
    A curse should be laid at your feet for being willing cohorts to promoting business profits over human liberty.

    I have had enough.
    I refuse to cooperate.
    I will insist on growing my own weed myself, not pay taxes on it, and encouraging people to attack state licensed cannabis outlets wherever they exist.
    Fuck Legalization. It’s just another pot law designed to raise prices and limit access.
    ABOLISH ALL POT LAWS NOW… (or ELSE!)

    (And when I say “Or Else”, I mean that I hope that you have plenty of broken window and paint balloon and shoplifting security and insurance available, as I and my supporters plan to try to make it almost IMPOSSIBLE for you to afford to stay in business in retribution against your anti-people and pro capital practices.)
    Fuck Legalization. Fuck those who support Legalization instead of grow your own.
    You are not a patriot or even a good hippie if that is what you want. Instead, I am calling you out for being a DEMON, an EVIL BAD PERSON, instead of a decent human being.
    You have had your chance. You choose poorly.
    Now you get to pay the penalty for those bad decisions.

    Fuck NORML.
    Fuck MPP.
    Fuck DPA.
    Fuck SAFER.
    Fuck Rob Kampia.
    Fuck Ethan Nadelman.
    Fuck Keith Stroup.

    These are the leaders who are to blame.
    These are the guys who are more interested in continuing to handle pot cases as lawyers than they are in letting people grow their own pot.
    They deserve the harshest criticism possible, they need to be pied in public, de-pantsed, and embarrassed every time they show themselves in public to speak.
    They are doing a great service to the dollar, and a complete sell out against the end consumer.
    They are also hurting pot itself by limiting research and development and production by designing systems with built in limitations designed to create personal wealth instead of creating systems designed around allowing universal public access.
    They are a pack of dastardly evil worms who deserve to be crushed and burned.

    Needless to say, I an no longer a pot activist, but rather a pot revolutionary.
    Until the weed is TRULY FREE and ALL can PARTAKE AND GROW, I will not be stopped or silenced.

    Fuck You if you disagree, because if you support Legalization instead of abolition, you are no better than some southern plantation owner talking about how good the slave system is because it is the source of your wealth.

    Fuck Legalization.

    Fuck YOU if you support Legalization.

    Abolition is the way.

    SOURCE

    House Judiciary Committee will vote on HB203, repealing the death penalty in Kentucky on March 9, 2016 !!


    On March 9, members of the House Judiciary Committee will vote on State Rep. David Floyd’s House Bill 203, a bill that repeals the death penalty and establishes life without parole as the maximum punishment for capital murder. It also calls for re-sentencing those on Kentucky’s death row to life without parole.

    Your State Representative is a member of this committee. We need 10 of the 19 members to vote YES to bring this bill to the House floor for a full debate and vote. Several members have committed to voting yes, but not all of them. So it is important that constituents contact these committee members and urge them to vote YES for HB 203 on March 9 during their committee meeting.

    Your voice is very important on this issue. Please give a brief statement about why you support this bill when you contact your state representative.

     

    You can call 1.800.372.7181 and leave a message with the operator who will make sure it is delivered to your State Representative. After stating why you oppose the death penalty, please ask your state representative to vote YES for HB 203 in the committee on March 9.

    Or you can use the email we have prepared for your use. Please be sure you start with a sentence in the beginning about your personal reasons for opposing the death penalty and how important it is to abolish it in Kentucky.

    It is also important that we fill the hearing room with supporters so if you are free to come to Frankfort on March 9, please join us at NOON in Room 171 of the Capital Annex Building.

    We are suggesting that people arrive around 11 a.m. If you come that will be a good time to introduce yourself to your state representative and reinforce that you want him or her to vote YES on HB 203.
    Thank you for supporting abolition of the death penalty and for taking the time to help pass this important legislation.

    Click the link below to log in and send your message:
    https://www.votervoice.net/BroadcastLinks/jfuHeixYS8mP9SSveJ9HTQ

     

    AN ACT relating to the abolition of the death penalty (BILL PDF)

     

    http://kcadp.org/