Tag Archives: Water Protectors

Bless The Water around the World on March 22 for World Water Day


 

Join us on World Water Day

in a Global Prayer for Water
Join us as we come together to Bless The Water around the World on March 22 for World Water Day.
Gather at your local water source, or home, and place good intentions and prayers into the water. Let’s stand in solidarity with the world’s Water Protectors and take the first step towards
cleaning and restoring the world’s water because #WATERisLIFE.
Register now to listen to the free LIVE AUDIO BROADCAST at 5pm Pacific from Unify, led by Chief Phil Lane Jr.
And to watch the FREE UPLIFT FILM, ‘WATER is LIFE’, featuring
Dr. Gerald Pollack, Mayan Elder Tata Pedro, Dr. Bruce Lipton,
Uqualla Medicine Man, Vandana Shiva and Whaia Whaea.

500,000 people are getting clean water access!

Want to help us make it 1 Million?

Last year, the Bless The Water campaign helped Waterbearers get clean water filters to 8 countries, and this year they are delivering their first systems on US soil, on World Water Day March 22!

Just $50 gets clean water access to 100 people for ten years!

Dakota protesters regroup, plot resistance to other pipelines


Sat Feb 25, 2017

A man warms up by a fire in Sacred Stone camp, one of the few remaining camps protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline in Cannon Ball, North Dakota, U.S., February 24, 2017. REUTERS/Stephen Yang

By Terray Sylvester | CANNON BALL, N.D.

Opponents of the Dakota Access Pipeline who were pushed out of their protest camp this week have vowed to keep up efforts to stop the multibillion-dollar project and take the fight to other pipelines as well.

The Oceti Sakowin camp in Cannon Ball, North Dakota, was cleared by law enforcement on Thursday and almost 50 people, many of them Native Americans and environmental activists, were arrested.

The number of demonstrators had dwindled from the thousands who poured into the camp starting in August to oppose the pipeline that critics say threatens the water resources and sacred land of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. The tribe has said it intends to fight the pipeline in court.

The 1,170-mile (1,885 km) line, built by Energy Transfer Partners LP, will move crude from the shale oilfields of North Dakota to Illinois en route to the Gulf of Mexico, where many U.S. refineries are located.

Tonya Olsen, 46, an Ihanktonwan Sioux from Sioux Falls, South Dakota, who had lived at the camp for 3-1/2 months, said she was saddened by the eviction but proud of the protesters.

She has moved to another nearby camp on Standing Rock Sioux Tribe reservation land, across the Cannon Ball River.

“A lot of people will take what they’ve learned from this movement and take it to another one,” Olsen said. She may join a protest if one forms against the Keystone XL pipeline near the Lower Brulé Sioux Reservation in South Dakota, she added.

Tom Goldtooth, a protest leader and executive director of the Indigenous Environmental Network, said the demonstrators’ hearts were not defeated.

“The closing of the camp is not the end of a movement or fight, it is a new beginning,” Goldtooth said in a statement on Thursday. “They cannot extinguish the fire that Standing Rock started.”

Many hope their fight against the project will spur similar protests targeting pipelines across the United States and Canada, particularly those routed near Native American land.

“The embers are going to be carried all over the place,” said Forest Borie, 34, a protester from Tijuana, Mexico, who spent four months in North Dakota.

“This is going to be a revolutionary year,” he added.

NEXT TARGETS

Borie wants to go next to Canada to help the Unist’ot’en Native American Tribe in their long-running opposition to pipelines in British Columbia.

Energy Transfer Partners, the Dallas-based company constructing the Dakota Access pipeline, is already facing pushback from a diverse base of opposition in Louisiana, where it is planning to expand its Bayou Bridge pipeline.

Other projects mentioned by protesters as possible next stops include the Sabal Trail pipeline being built to transport natural gas from eastern Alabama to central Florida, and Energy Transfer Partners’ Trans-Pecos in West Texas. Sabal Trail is a joint project of Spectra Energy Corp, NextEra Energy Inc and Duke Energy Corp.

Another protest is focused on Plains All American Pipeline’s Diamond Pipeline, which will run from Cushing, Oklahoma, to Valero Energy Corp’s Memphis refinery in Tennessee.

Anthony Gazotti, 47, from Denver, said he will stay on reservation land until he is forced out. Despite construction resuming on the Dakota pipeline, he said the protest was a success because it had raised awareness of pipeline issues nationwide.

“It’s never been about just stopping that pipeline,” he said.

June Sapiel, a 47-year-old member of the Penobscot Tribe in Penobscot, Maine, also rejected the idea that the protesters in North Dakota had failed.

“It’s waking people up,” she said in front of a friend’s yurt where she has been staying. “We’re going to go out there and just keep doing it.”

(Additional reporting by Timothy Mclaughlin in Chicago and Liz Hampton in Houston; Writing by Ben Klayman; Editing by Matthew Lewis)

CONTINUE READING…

The Indigenous Environment Network Responds to Forced Evacuation of DAPL Resistance Camps


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Media Contacts:
Jade Begay, jade@ienearth.org, 505-699-4791
Nina Smith, nina@megaphonestrategies.com, 301-717-9006

We apologize for incorrectly identifying 7th Generation Camp as Four Bands camp and have made the correction in the text below.

CANNON BALL, N.D.— At  2 pm CT on February 22, 2017, water protectors at the Oceti Sakowin camp were evicted by the Army Corps of Engineers. Despite efforts from camp leaders requesting more time to clean up the camp, the Army Corp remained firm with its plans to vacate the camp. The Army Corp claims jurisdiction of the land that the camp is located on even though the land is within the unceded Fort Laramie Treaty land and territories.
Individuals who voluntarily left camp prior to 2 o’clock had the choice to take a bus to be transported to an evacuation center, or relocate to other campsites outside of the eviction zone. Water protectors remaining in the camp now face risk of arrest.
There are three other campsites in the area for water protectors to relocate to: Sacred Stone, Cheyenne River, and 7th Generation camps.
Various law enforcement jurisdictions were on site including Morton County Sheriff’s, North Dakota State Highway Patrol and the North Dakota National Guard and National Park Service Rangers. The Bureau of Indian Affairs Law Enforcement established a traffic checkpoint and barricade on Standing Rock Sioux Tribe reservation land, on Highway 1806, to the south of the Cannonball River bridge.
The following is a statement by Tom Goldtooth, the Executive Director of the Indigenous Environmental Network:
“We are appalled by today’s forced evacuations of indigenous people at the Camp at Standing Rock, they are a violent and unnecessary infringement on the constitutional right of water protectors to peacefully protest and exercise their freedom of speech. It hinders the camp cleanup process and creates confusion and chaos that puts the Missouri River at risk of pollution from construction and camping debris.
“Today’s expulsion is a continuation of a centuries old practice, where the U.S. Government forcefully removes Indigenous people from our lands and territories. We urge supporters of the water protectors to continue to resist this travesty by organizing mass mobilizations, distributed actions, speaking out against the violations of the Treaty rights of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and the Seven Council Fires of the Great Sioux Nation, and continuing to source up the capacity for litigation and grassroots organizing against the Dakota Access pipeline.
“Our hearts are not defeated. The closing of the camp is not the end of a movement or fight, it is a new beginning. They cannot extinguish the fire that Standing Rock started. It burns within each of us. We will rise, we will resist, and we will thrive. We are sending loving thoughts to the water protectors along the banks of the Cannonball River, today. May everyone be as safe as can be. #noDAPL”

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The Indigenous Environmental Network  |  PO Box 485  |  Bemidji, MN 56619  | http://www.ienearth.org/

Tuesday February 7, the US Army Corps gave notice of intent to grant the final easement for the Dakota Access Pipeline


Rise With Standing Rock and Indigenous Resistance

Yesterday, Tuesday February 7, the US Army Corps gave notice of intent to grant the final easement for the Dakota Access Pipeline to cross the Mni Sose (Missouri River). 

They are skipping the Environmental Impact Study ordered in December, and skipping the congressional notification period required by law to push through a destructive, exploitative and illegal pipeline. We knew these attacks on frontline communities were coming and now more than ever we must #GrowTheResistance and take bold action. We stand united with Indigenous Peoples and water protectors.

It Takes Roots (a formation of the Indigenous Environmental Network, Grassroots Global Justice Alliance, the Climate Justice Alliance and the Right To The City Alliance) is calling for all our member groups and communities to rise up TODAY FEBRUARY 8th in solidarity with the Indigenous Coalition at Standing Rock’s worldwide call for emergency actions “to disrupt business as usual and unleash a global intersectional resistance to fossil fuels and fascism.  Connect with other struggles.  Think long-term movement building.  We are in this for the long haul.” 
Tom Goldtooth, Executive Director of the Indigenous Environmental Network, said
“Donald Trump will not build his Dakota Access Pipeline without a fight. The granting of an easement, without any environmental review or tribal consultation, is not the end of this fight — it is the new beginning. Expect mass resistance far beyond what Trump has seen so far.
“The granting of this easement goes against protocol, it goes against legal process, it disregards more than 100,000 comments already submitted as part of the not-yet-completed environmental review process — all for the sake of Donald Trump’s billionaire big oil cronies. And, it goes against the treaty rights of the entire Seven Councils Fires of the Sioux Nations.”
Check out the call below and take action!

WORLDWIDE CALL TO ACTION FEB. 8

We are calling for emergency actions all over the world. PLEASE, THIS IS OUR LAST STAND.
Please visit everydayofaction.org to find or register an action wherever you are. Check out our world action map  to join the mass distributed actions TODAY, February 8th. 

ACTION PLANNING TIPS

We encourage groups across the globe to connect our prayers for the water with other fights against fascism and the domination of people and Mother Earth (deportations, muslim ban, attacks on labor, deregulation of wall street, other fossil fuel projects, censorship of the press and academia, etc).
Choose the target that is most strategic for building long-term collaborative resistance in your local area.  Potential targets may include:  city halls, federal buildings, army corps offices, ICE detention centers, banks profiting off DAPL, sheriff’s offices that have come to Standing Rock, labor union offices, sites of workplace struggle, etc.
MESSAGING – please amplify and use the messaging put out here by

  • Rise with Standing Rock….against violations of sovereignty, crimes against Mother Earth, fascism, violation of law, etc.
  • Continue to elevate what’s happening on the ground in ND — demonstrate that this is something serious that resonates to all peoples in the face of Trump administration tyranny. Follow: @IENEarth on twitter and facebook.
  • Support Tribes’ request for TRO (Temporary Restraining Order)/injunction!
  • Resist Trump’s direct attack against indigenous communities with his executive orders re: DAPL & KXL. Indigenous communities are not backing down.
  • Police violence seems inevitable and mass casualties are very likely. The only way to keep people safe is to do the Environmental Impact Study.  If not, any blood spilled is on Trump’s hands and the hands of the Corps.   

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The Indigenous Environmental Network  |  PO Box 485  |  Bemidji, MN 56619  | http://www.ienearth.org/

Global Coalition Stages Protests and Bank Closures Across Mother Earth to Defund Dakota Access Pipeline


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: February 3, 2017

CONTACT:
For inquiries to the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, contact Nick Pelosi, Director Corporate Engagement, First Peoples Worldwide, standingrockdapl@gmail.com, 540-899-6545

For inquiries to the Indigenous Coalition at Standing Rock, contact Tara Houska, National Campaign Director, Honor the Earth, tara@honortheearth.org, 612-226-9404

For inquiries about the week of action and event logistics contact Vanessa Green, Individual Campaign Director, DivestInvest, vanessa@divestinvest.org, 617-230-8942

Global Coalition Stages Protests and Bank Closures Across Mother Earth to Defund Dakota Access Pipeline

While Trump, Energy Transfer Partners and Sunoco Logistics race to complete the pipeline, over 700,000 people representing over $2.3 billion in personal investments say no.

New York, Madrid, Munich, San Francisco, Tokyo, Amsterdam – On January 24th, President Trump signed a presidential memorandum fast tracking the Dakota Access Pipeline and environmental reviews of other projects. The corporations behind DAPL made it clear that they “fully expect to complete construction of the pipeline without any additional rerouting in and around Lake Oahe.”

There are three ways banks can be involved in the financing of DAPL: extending lines of credit to companies with ownership stakes, being directly invested in project sponsor companies (owning assets or shares), or providing project loan funds.

The completion of DAPL is critically dependent on those 17 banks that are jointly providing the project loan for the construction of the pipeline. All of them are facing massive protest against their involvement. Several banks in the consortium have now also openly criticised the project sponsors for not being sufficiently responsive to the concerns of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe.

The pressure to terminate their involvement in the project has been increasing further over the last few weeks as hundreds of thousands of people worldwide are signing petitions to DAPL banks. Thousands more have already closed their accounts and defunded over $55 million and counting. This week, activists are showing up in person to make their voices heard on behalf of another 700,000+ people worldwide, a percentage of whom voluntarily report having over $2.3 billion invested in these banks through checking, mortgage, and credit card accounts – which they are ready to divest if the banks continue financing DAPL.

From January 30 to February 3, various events took place in cities around the world to deliver copies of the petitions and signatures to local branches and global headquarters of the 17 banks directly funding the construction of the DAPL: Bank of Tokyo Mitsubishi UFJ, BayernLB, BBVA, BNP Paribas, Citigroup, Crédit Agricole, DNB ASA, ICBC, ING, Intesa Sanpaolo, Mizuho Bank, Natixis, SMBC, Société Générale, SunTrust Robinson Humphrey, TD Bank, Wells Fargo. A full list of ongoing #NoDAPL 2017 actions is here.

The Sacred Stone Camp and their allies have vowed to stand their ground as long as DAPL construction equipment remains on Oceti Sakowin treaty land. The global coalition plans to continue pressure on all banks funding fossils throughout 2017.

In support of these actions, leaders from the movements to stop DAPL said the following:

Dallas Goldtooth, Keep It In the Ground Campaigner, Indigenous Environmental Network, said: “President Trump wishes to fast-track the construction of the Dakota Access pipeline, against federal law and tribal treaty rights. Indigenous nations and communities will not be the sacrifice zones for President Trump’s fossil fuel regime. We remain steadfast in our defense of our inherent rights and the protection of Mother Earth and we implore our allies to stand with us. We must remind the investors of this pipeline that they, via their financing, are threatening the lives of water protectors and it’s time to be held accountable for that.”

Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Chairman Dave Archambault II said: “By attempting to fast track DAPL, President Trump has made it clear that his priorities lie with his wealthy contributors rather than the public interest. Banks now have an opportunity to take a stand against this reckless assault on our treaty rights and water, or be complicit and continue to lose millions.”

Judith LeBlanc, Director, Native Organizers Alliance and member of the Caddo Tribe of Oklahoma, said: “The decision to build the Dakota Access Pipeline was made in the halls of power by a handful representing banks and corporations willing to sacrifice Mother Earth for profit. The decision to stop it will be made by the many, all across the world, who know that Mother Earth and water give us life. Time is now for investors to also stand for Mother Earth. We started at Standing Rock, now Standing Rock is everywhere.”

Chase Iron Eyes, lead attorney, Lakota People’s Law Project, said: “It’s inspiring to see the power of global currency being leveraged in the frontline movement at Standing Rock. Separate fights — defending clean drinking water, upholding constitutional freedoms, creating a new energy economy — are becoming one as people recognize and respond to the problem of banks using their money to finance human rights violations and brutality. If money rules the day then we will bring compassion to our capital by divesting.”

Angus Wong, Campaign Manager, SumOfUs: “Trump’s green light of the destructive Dakota Pipeline is a corporate scheme to enrich himself and his corporate friends. But we know targeting banks to stop financing this dangerous pipeline works — two days after we delivered hundreds of thousands of SumOfUs members’ signatures to Norway-based DNB bank headquarters in November, it pulled its assets in the pipeline. We hope DNB will again demonstrate leadership by committing to withdraw its project funding.”
Erich Pica, President, Friends of the Earth US, said: “The voices of Indigenous peoples have been ignored for too long – by the US government, corporations and big banks. By not acknowledging Indigenous peoples, these banks are perpetuating a pattern of colonialism and failing to respect Indigenous peoples’ rights to Free, Prior and Informed Consent.”

Vanessa Green, Director of DivestInvest Individual, said: “DAPL is simply the wrong kind of investment, and people don’t want their money behind it. With government mandates to scale up clean energy investments, a market increasingly supportive of a low carbon future, and unprecedented consumer and investor interest in moving money into climate and community solutions, the question now is which banks will lose the most in this historic energy transition.”

Mary Sweeters, Climate Campaigner with Greenpeace USA, said: “People across the world have pledged their solidarity with the Indigenous communities who reject this dirty pipeline and the threat it poses to the water and climate. The banks must choose whether they want to continue to invest their money in yesterday or listen to the millions of people who stand with Standing Rock.”

Fran Teplitz, Executive Co-director of Green America, said: “Now more than ever we need to move away from destructive fossil fuel pipelines and pursue a clean energy future. Indigenous communities are demonstrating heroic leadership by protecting water, the source of life, from the dangers of pipelines. We call on the government and banks to halt support for the Dakota Access Pipeline immediately.”
Kristen Perry, Climate Justice Montreal Organizer, said: “We need to stop funding projects which endanger water, land, and our communities, and instead follow the lead of defenders calling for direct action and support. It is crucial that we center justice for communities on the frontline of the crisis and the forefront of solutions, and pushing for divestment and the defunding of destructive projects is a tangible way for us to take action in solidarity with Indigenous communities across colonial borders.”
Yago Martínez from Ecologistas en Acción, said: “DAPL is not only a clear violation of Indigenous people’s rights but also a major climate threat. We believe in the importance of international solidarity to achieve goals leading to global and climatic justice, and therefore we cannot fail to stand with Standing Rock. We must raise our voices. Banks from all over the world are involved in this destructive project and they must be held accountable.”

Ruth Breech, Campaigner, Rainforest Action Network, said: “The Dakota Access Pipeline is a morally and financially bankrupt project. If banks value Indigenous rights and free, prior and informed consent, they will leave this project immediately. We don’t need another pipeline. We need financial institutions that are willing to take a stand and do the right thing-divest from the Dakota Access Pipeline.”

Leila Salazar López, Executive Director, Amazon Watch, said: “Indigenous peoples across the Americas, from Standing Rock to the Amazon, have for years been standing up against the destructive, racist practices of the fossil fuel industry. The number of people withdrawing their money from the banks supporting the Dakota Access pipeline is a clear signal to those banks that destructive fossil fuel projects are a bad financial, social, and environmental investment.”

Regine Richter of the German organization urgewald, said: “European banks involved in financing DAPL might think they are far enough away and can get off the hook from the protests. But here as well people are enthusiastic to stand with Standing Rock and protest against the loan, as we do this week at BayernLB.”
Johan Frijns, Director BankTrack, said: “The Dakota Access Pipeline is becoming a litmus test for all banks involved on how they let environmental, social and human impacts weigh in when considering finance for a particular project. In this case, the ongoing violation of the rights of the Sioux Tribe leave them no other option but to withdraw from the project.”

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NODAPL, Water is life, Indigenous Rising

The Indigenous Environmental Network is an international environmental justice nonprofit that works with tribal grassroots organizations to build the capacity of Indigenous communities. Find out more at: www.ienearth.org

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The Indigenous Environmental Network  |  PO Box 485  |  Bemidji, MN 56619  | http://www.ienearth.org/

‘The Dakota Access pipeline is becoming a litmus test for all banks involved’


With the Trump administration making clear its intent to push forward the Dakota Access pipeline (DAPL) regardless of widespread opposition, campaigners are ramping up their call for the project’s financial backers to pull their support.

“If money rules the day then we will bring compassion to our capital by divesting.”
—Chase Iron Eyes, Lakota People’s Law Project

A coalition of groups supporting the defunding campaign announced Friday that more than 700,000 people have signed onto petitions demanding DAPL-financing banks divest from the project. That number “includes individuals who collectively report having over $2.3 billion invested in these banks through checking, mortgage, and credit card accounts, which they are ready to divest if the banks continue financing DAPL,” according to a statement from organizers. Already, the divestment effort has led to the removal of $55 million and counting from more than a dozen banks. 

Reporting on how the #DeFundDAPL movement is spreading across Indigenous nations on Thursday, Frances Madeson wrote for Yes! Magazine:

“Many people are, rightfully, afraid that [President Donald Trump’s] executive support now means that the pipelines are full steam ahead,” said Melanie Yazzie, co-founder of The Red Nation, an activist coalition dedicated to the liberation of Native people from capitalism and colonialism. She views divestment as obstruction—the good kind—something akin to water protectors locking down on construction equipment and as a continuation of the widespread resistance that has united under the cry of #NoDAPL.

“The investors and financiers will not move forward if the projects are deemed financially unfavorable,” Yazzie said. “We must continue to deny settlers their desired profits, profits they reap from colonizing our non-human relatives—the land and water.”

That is the hope of a growing cohort of tribal leaders, activists, researchers, and strategists who have come to see divestment, which is catching on all across Indian Country, as a winning tactic in a wider strategy of non-cooperation.

“Indigenous peoples across the Americas, from Standing Rock to the Amazon, have for years been standing up against the destructive, racist practices of the fossil fuel industry,” Leila Salazar López, executive director of Amazon Watch, said Friday. “The number of people withdrawing their money from the banks supporting the Dakota Access pipeline is a clear signal to those banks that destructive fossil fuel projects are a bad financial, social, and environmental investment.”

The 17 banks directly funding the construction of the DAPL are: Bank of Tokyo Mitsubishi UFJ, BayernLB, BBVA, BNP Paribas, Citigroup, Crédit Agricole, DNB ASA, ICBC, ING, Intesa Sanpaolo, Mizuho Bank, Natixis, SMBC, Société Générale, SunTrust Robinson Humphrey, TD Bank, and Wells Fargo.

Protests at branch locations took place all week around the country and the world.

And there’s evidence that the campaign is having an effect.

International finance tracking organization BankTrack reported Thursday that Dutch bank ABN AMRO—which has not directly contributed to DAPL construction but had provided a total of $45 million in credit to parent company Energy Transfer Equity (ETE)—announced it would end its financing for ETE if the pipeline is pursued without the consent of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, or if further violence is used against protesters. 

“The Dakota Access pipeline is becoming a litmus test for all banks involved on how they let environmental, social, and human impacts weigh in when considering finance for a particular project,” said BankTrack direcor Johan Frijns.

In separate but related news, Seattle’s Affordable Housing, Neighborhoods and Finance Committee this week voted to divest $3 billion from Wells Fargo over its support for DAPL. A final vote from the full council is coming Monday.

“It’s inspiring to see the power of global currency being leveraged in the frontline movement at Standing Rock,” added Chase Iron Eyes, lead attorney for the Lakota People’s Law Project, who was arrested protesting the pipeline just this week.

“Separate fights—defending clean drinking water, upholding constitutional freedoms, creating a new energy economy—are becoming one as people recognize and respond to the problem of banks using their money to finance human rights violations and brutality,” he said. “If money rules the day then we will bring compassion to our capital by divesting.”

The Standing Rock Sioux and its allies are also planning a Native Nations March on Washington for Friday, March 10.

CONTINUE READING…

ACTION ON JANUARY 28th TO CARRY THE PRAYER FROM STANDING ROCK TO BANKS WORLDWIDE


Dear Global Family,

Thank you for your commitment to our collective future.
Standing Rock is still standing strong through freezing temperatures, bravely holding the prayer for our water, our earth and our children’s future – And they need our help.

YOU ARE INVITED TO JOIN A GLOBAL SYNCHRONIZED PRAYER ACTION ON JANUARY 28th TO CARRY THE PRAYER FROM STANDING ROCK TO BANKS WORLDWIDE

The Global Prayer Action is carrying the prayer and request from Standing Rock to the steps of the Banks around the World who are funding Oil Pipelines, sending a clear message of solidarity and demand for change – The frontline is now everywhere. 

There will be a live prayer broadcast shared from Standing Rock camp – a prayer for all water, for all life – led by indigenous elders. You can join from wherever you are!
This is an opportunity to be a part of history by uniting our global community to support the water protectors at Standing Rock through local actions at banks.

“Let us put our hearts and minds together and
see what future we can make for our children.”
– Sitting Bull (Hunkpapa Lakota Oyate)

One week after inauguration we are taking this action to show that this is not over. 

Empowered as one, we can make change. 

We will stand, pray and meditate to elevate the consciousness of the financial institutions, administration and corporations funding oil extraction around the world by asking that they make the choice to invest in clean renewable energy and the future of our planet.

We are also looking at our own desires and choices for short-term gain over long term sustainability to heal this pattern within ourselves, to heal the earth. 

Through this prayer action we ask our governments to incentivize the banks to make long terms investments that benefit our grandchildren and our planet of corporate profits. 
We are connecting activists, advocates, actors, musicians, artists, media, environmental organizations, educators and prayerful people to join our Indigenous Leaders and Water Protectors.
The prayer will broadcast live from Standing Rock on January 28th as we simultaneously carry the prayer to the steps of banks worldwide.

Let your heart shine and our prayers be heard.

Click Here to Join: www.GlobalPrayerAction.com

You can join the prayer broadcast from wherever you are or find a prayer action happening at a local bank near you!
If there is no prayer action on the Global Prayer Action near you on the world-wide interactive map, please consider creating an event in your community.

Mitakuye Oyasin ~ We are All Related

Mni Wiconi ~ Water is Life
On behalf of the Global Prayer Action campaign

At UNIFY we share virtual and in-person transformational experiences that support your most passionate, peaceful, purposeful, and amazing life.
We also organize global synchronized meditations and days of social action. We now have more than 7,500 organizers that bring their communities together for campaigns we launch on Peace Day, Earth Day, Water Day, and more.  Thank you for doing your part every day!

We must defend the victory at Standing Rock


We must defend the victory at Standing Rock

Get Involved
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Indigenous water protectors last month secured a major win for Standing Rock. Your actions helped. The Army Corps of Engineers was convinced to halt the Dakota Access Pipeline and conduct an Environmental Impact Statement review.
We need to stand with Standing Rock to ensure that the environmental review won’t be stopped by President-elect Trump.
Progress on the pipeline review is stalled. Although it’s been over a month, the Army Corps of Engineers hasn’t started the review yet. This review is a crucial step in ensuring that the government hears the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s concerns about the pipeline. If the review doesn’t start before President-elect Trump takes office, it could be easier for him to scrap it and ram through completion of the pipeline.
We can’t leave the Dakota Access Pipeline in Trump’s hands: call the Army Corps comment line right now and ask them to start the Environmental Impact Statement review immediately, before January 20th.
President-elect Trump has vowed to fast track the construction of pipelines within his first 100 days in office. We can’t let him ignore the serious human rights issues at play with the Dakota Access Pipeline.
I’ve been to Standing Rock and have spoken with the communities whose land, water and cultural sites are at stake. I’m worried for what might happen under a Trump Administration and what this might mean for the lives of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and others that could be affected.
Make the call to the Army Corps right now. It’s easy, quick and can make a real impact. We’ll give you the number and a script for what to say.
The U.S. government must acknowledge that Indigenous people have the right to be involved in decisions that could impact their human rights.
Thank you for taking action.
Sincerely,
Zeke
Zeke Johnson
Individuals at Risk Program
Amnesty International USA

Take Action!

Amnesty International USA

The US Army Corps of Engineers will not grant permission for the Dakota Access Pipeline to cross Lake Oahe


 

The Department of the Army will not approve an easement that would allow the proposed Dakota Access Pipeline to cross under Lake Oahe in North Dakota,” said a statement on the US Army website, citing the Assistant Secretary for Civil Works, Jo-Ellen Darcy.

According to Darcy, it was “clear” they needed to address concerns of tribal leaders who expressed concerns over the potential environmental impact of the Dakota Access Pipeline, and “the best way to complete that work responsibly and expeditiously is to explore alternate routes for the pipeline crossing.”
“The consideration of alternative routes would be best accomplished through an Environmental Impact Statement with full public input and analysis,” the Army statement said
.

Standing Rock Sioux chairman Dave Archambault II has issued a statement expressing his gratitude to the Obama administration for enabling the “historic decision” to re-reroute the pipeline.

“We wholeheartedly support the decision of the administration and commend with the utmost gratitude the courage it took on the part of President Obama, the Army Corps, the Department of Justice and the Department of the Interior to take steps to correct the course of history and to do the right thing,” he wrote.

The news is a massive win for the Sioux tribe that established the protest camp at the site in April and has gained huge support in recent weeks.

Military veterans joined activists, who call themselves water protectors, at Standing Rock this week, with more than 3,500 pledging to join the demonstration.

Some 26 activists were injured in a November 20 confrontation when police fired water cannon in below-freezing temperatures. Rubber bullets and tear gas were also reportedly used against the water protectors on site.

Around 564 people were arrested during the protests, according to the Morton County Sheriff’s Department.

CONTINUE READING…

 

Additional Information:

Army denies Dakota pipeline permit, in victory for Native tribes

 

U.S. Climate Plan@usclimateplan 1h1 hour ago Pennsylvania, USA

#NoDAPL VICTORY! A powerful and humbling statement from @StandingRockST Chair. Thanks to @POTUS for decision to #StandWithStandingRock.

U.S. veterans build barracks for pipeline protesters in cold


By Ernest Scheyder and Terray Sylvester | CANNON BALL, N.D.

U.S. military veterans were building barracks on Friday at a protest camp in North Dakota to support thousands of activists who have squared off against authorities in frigid conditions to oppose a multibillion-dollar pipeline project near a Native American reservation.

Veterans volunteering to be human shields have been arriving at the Oceti Sakowin camp near the small town of Cannon Ball, where they will work with protesters who have spent months demonstrating against plans to route the Dakota Access Pipeline beneath a lake near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation, organizers said.

The Native Americans and protesters say the $3.8 billion pipeline threatens water resources and sacred sites.

Some of the more than 2,100 veterans who signed up on the Veterans Stand for Standing Rock group’s Facebook page are at the camp, with hundreds more expected during the weekend. Tribal leaders asked the veterans, who aim to form a wall in front of police to protect the protesters, to avoid confrontation with authorities and not get arrested.

Wesley Clark Jr, a writer whose father is retired U.S. Army General Wesley Clark, met with law enforcement on Friday to tell them that potentially 3,500 veterans would join the protest and the demonstrations would be carried out peacefully, protest leaders said.

The plan is for veterans to gather in Eagle Butte, a few hours away, and then travel by bus to the main protest camp, organizers said, adding that a big procession is planned for Monday.

Protesters began setting up tents, tepees and other structures in April, and the numbers swelled in August at the main camp.

Joshua Tree, 42, from Los Angeles, who has been visiting the camp for weeks at a time since September, said he felt pulled to the protest.

“Destiny called me here,” he said at the main camp. “We’re committed.”

“GO HOME”

The protesters’ voices have also been heard by companies linked to the pipeline, including banks that protesters have targeted for their financing of the pipeline.

Wells Fargo & Co (WFC.N) said in a Thursday letter it would meet with Standing Rock elders before Jan. 1 “to discuss their concerns related to Wells Fargo’s investment” in the project.

There have been violent confrontations near the route of the pipeline with state and local law enforcement, who used tear gas, rubber bullets and water hoses on the protesters, even in freezing weather.

The number of protesters in recent weeks has topped 1,000. State officials on Monday ordered them to leave the snowy camp, which is on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers land, citing harsh weather, but on Wednesday they said they would not enforce the order.

“There is an element there of people protesting who are frightening,” North Dakota Attorney General Wayne Stenehjem said on Thursday. “It’s time for them to go home.”

Morton County Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier spoke by phone on Friday with U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch, but assistance for law enforcement and a timeline for a resolution to the situation were not offered, the sheriff’s office said.

Lynch said in a statement that the U.S. Department of Justice has been in communication with all sides in an effort to reduce tensions and foster dialogue. She said senior department officials will be deployed to the region as needed.

U.S. President-elect Donald Trump said on Thursday he supported the completion of the pipeline, and his transition team said he supported peaceful protests.

North Dakota Governor Jack Dalrymple said on Wednesday it was “probably not feasible” to reroute the pipeline, but he would try to rebuild a relationship with Standing Rock Sioux leaders.

 

On Friday, Morton County Commission Chairman Cody Schulz said his office has been working in conjunction with the governor’s office to meet with tribal leaders soon.

FREEZING COLD

Since the start of demonstrations, 564 people have been arrested, the Morton County Sheriff’s Department said.

State officials never contemplated forcibly removing protesters, and Dalrymple said his evacuation order stemmed mainly from concerns about dangerously cold temperatures.

The temperature in Cannon Ball is expected to fall to 4 degrees Fahrenheit (-16 Celsius) by the middle of next week, according to Weather.com forecasts.

The 1,172-mile (1,885-km) pipeline project, owned by Texas-based Energy Transfer Partners LP (ETP.N), is mostly complete, except for a segment planned to run under Lake Oahe, a reservoir formed by a dam on the Missouri River.

Protesters, who refer to themselves as “water protectors,” have been gearing up for the winter while they await the Army Corps decision on whether to allow Energy Transfer to tunnel under the river. The Army Corps has twice delayed that decision.

(Additional reporting by Timothy Mclaughlin in Chicago and David Gaffen in New York; Editing by Matthew Lewis and Leslie Adler)

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